Week 10 Definition:

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Last Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

This Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, organizing, coaching, molding, and setting a positive example for a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

I enjoyed reading the articles about group work, but did not include them in my definition. I found these articles to be interesting for two different reasons.The first is that I am interested in social psychology, and the second is because we did a lot of group work in this class. It was interesting to compare my two groups to the models that both authors offered. I found that my weekly group did not have much conflict and we were able to get our work done without any issues. We encountered one difference of opinon on using the online tools for extra credit, but we were all very understanding and moved through it without any lingering problems. My weekly group definitely reached the "preforming" stage as the article by Komives, Lucas, & McMahon suggests. However, my group for the social change project was very rushed and we encountered many issues in the "storming" stage. We got over them quite quickly due to time contraints and the need to get our project done. As for the article I would say that both of my groups tended to be Adaptive when going through stages of group development. Neither of my groups followed the order of stages in a linear fashion, because both went back to fix issues and other things that we were facing.

Week 9 Definition:

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Last Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

This Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, organizing, coaching, molding, and setting a positive example for a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

This week's defintion changed a bit from last week's definition. I added the words "teaching, molding, and setting a positive example." When I was brainstorming my strengths in leadership, I realized that I use a lot of teaching, molding, and setting a good example. These three actions help make groups more efficient as well as giving them an edge in meeting their goals.

Week 8 Definition:

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Last Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

This Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

I am feeling incredibly redundant, but I did not change my definition for this week. Although the research by Session was interesting and applicable to a work environment, I did not feel as though the article could contribute to my definition of leadership. The article by Paloff & Pratt included some aspects of effective leadership, but there were no additions that I felt would highly change or make my definition better. Finally, the article by Saphiere, Mikk, & Devries talked about effective communication. I found this article to be very interesting and helpful when trying to communicate in a variety of circumstances, such as work, as a leader, and even in personal relationships. However, I did not find any of the general or specific ideas to be helpful to my definition.

Week 7 Definition:

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Last Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

This Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

My definition did not change again this week. The reason is that again I felt the articles were reiterating what I already liked about previous articles, or they went into too much detail for a 3-sentence definition. The article by Kegan & Lahey had many similarties to previous articles, such as being aware of yourself, your strengths and your ability to change. I liked their views on leadership and how to be an effective leader, but felt that the second and third chapters were too much detail to go into in a 3-sentence defintion. In the second article by Goleman, Boyatzis & McKee, I felt that their plan for change was a good idea. However, again, it was too much detail for a 3-sentence definition.

Week 6 Definition:

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Last Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

This Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

My defintion for this week did not change at all. I felt as though the aricles this wee supported some of the points that I had already made. The articles that brought up a new idea, such as "servant leadership," seemed like a new spin on what has been previously read. "Servant leadership" had a lot to do with playing up your strengths and being people focused. The guidebook talked a lot about individual differences and making them harmonious, which is also and idea that was prevoiusly discussed. I liked the ideas in the article, "The sweet spot for achievement." I felt that the idea of balancing stress was a good thing. However, the effects of stress were discussed in the earlier article "The biology of leadership." I like my definitnion thus far and I feel that it is a good represenation of what I agree with out of what we have learned.

Week 5 Definition:

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Last Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001) , and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

This Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001), are able to be effective observers by removing themselves from active participation in the organization (Heifetz & Linsky, 2002), and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Heifetz, R. A., & Linsky, M. (2002). "Get on the balcony." Leadership on the Line: Staying alive through the dangers of leading (pp. 51 - 74). Boston: Harvard Business School Press

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

Most of my definition for this week did not change, because I still agree with the previous weeks articles. In addition to my definition from last week, I added an idea from this week's article entitled "Get on the balcony." I agreed with the idea that an effective leader must be able to observe what is going on in their organziaiton objectively in order to have the most accurate understanding of what changes or adjustments they need to impliment.

Week 4 Definition:

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Last Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998), while also remaining true to their own personality characteristics (Rath & Conchie, 2008). Leadership can be displayed in a number of ways including being a visionary, a coach, by creating harmony and connecting people, taking a democratic approach, by pacesetting, or by commanding (Goleman, Boyatzis, & McKee, 2002).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.


This Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998). In addition, the most effective leaders have high levels of self-awareness, incorporate their personal vision with their leadership vision (Lee & King, 2001) , and acknowledge and utilize their personal strengths as leaders (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Lee, R. J., & King, S. N. (2001). "Ground your leadership vision in a personal vision." Discovering the Leader in You: A guide to realizing your personal leadership potential (pp. 31 - 54). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

This week I took out the final sentence of Week 3's definition, which gave examples of leaders. I thought that it was more important to include the idea from this week's reading by Lee & King, which was that the most effective leaders were self-aware and balanced this personal vision with their leadership vision. I think that this reading definitely stresses the importance of being self-aware and incorporating those strengths into your leadership vision. You can't be a leader by using characteristics or strengths you don't possess. I think that this week's reading by Lee & King is a great addition to the first week's reading by Rath & Conchie. Rath & Conchie stress the importance of leading by using your leadership strengths, and Lee & King stress the importance of knowing these strengths and incorporating them into your leadership vision.

Week 3 Definition:

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Last Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope and create stability, while also remaining true to their own personality characteristics (Rath & Conchie, 2008). Leadership can be displayed in a number of ways including being a visionary, a coach, by creating harmony and connecting people, taking a democratic approach, by pacesetting, or by commanding (Goleman, Boyatzis, & McKee, 2002).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

This Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope and create stability from the center rather than the top of the hierarchy (Kyle, 1998), while also remaining true to their own personality characteristics (Rath & Conchie, 2008). Leadership can be displayed in a number of ways including being a visionary, a coach, by creating harmony and connecting people, taking a democratic approach, by pacesetting, or by commanding (Goleman, Boyatzis, & McKee, 2002).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002). "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Kyle, D. T. (1998). "The sovereign: The power of presence." The Four Powers of Leadership: Presence, intention, wisdom, compassion (pp. 159 - 191). Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications Inc.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

I am having an internal struggle about what to keep in my definition, how broad or specific to get, and how much detail I should add. I am finding out that leadership is a very complicated idea to define, and in addition to that, almost impossible to do in just a few sentences. There are so many aspects that I am probably missing and it seems almost impossible to be able to include, or even think of, them all. However, I really do like how much my definition does cover. I only changed one small aspect this week that I really liked from Kyle's article, which is that a leader should lead from the center instead of from a position of hierarchy. I agreed with this wholeheartedly, because the most effective leaders are not leaders so that they can possess power. Rather, they are leaders for the people and are in it to create the best possible atmosphere for their followers.

Week 2 Definition:

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Last Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability, while also remaining true to their own personality characteristics (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.

This Week's Definition: Leadership is directing, supporting, inspiring, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope and create stability, while also remaining true to their own personality characteristics (Rath & Conchie, 2008). Leadership can be displayed in a number of ways including being a visionary, a coach, by creating harmony and connecting people, taking a democratic approach, by pacesetting, or by commanding (Goleman, Boyatzis, & McKee, 2002).


Goleman, D., Boyatziz, R., & McKee, A. (2002) "The leadership repertoire." Primal leadership: Learning to lead with emotional intelligence (pp. 53 - 69). Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.

Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:Gallup Press.


Explanation: I kept a lot of my definition the same. I felt that last week's reading, which talked about trust and playing on your strengths, and an original thought about the main goals of a leader, were still ideas that I agreed with. In addition to those ideas, from this week's reading, I added the different ways a leader can go about leading. I believe that showing the different ways to lead will create a broader definition of leadership, which is how I believe it should be. There is not one specific definition or example of leadership. I believe, after reading this week's and last week's readings and looking at many different examples of leaders from these readings, that each person takes all of the different areas and aspects of a leader in order to create their own leadership platform based on their personality and what is right for them. Thus, there are probably as many approaches to leadership as there are people in the world.

Week 1 Definition:

| 1 Comment

Leadership is directing, supporting, and organizing a group of people to accomplish a certain goal. In order to be effective, leaders should gain the trust of the group, provide members with compassion, build hope, and create stability, while also remaining true to their own personality characteristics (Rath & Conchie, 2008).


Rath, T., & Conchie, B. (2008). Strengths Based Leadership. New York, NY:

Gallup Press.

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