Recently in School of Public Health Category

U of M health policy experts talk health reform

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On 6/28/2012, the United States Supreme Court issued their decision on the Affordable Care Act.

Here is a synopsis of how the Supreme Court ruled:

1. The entire ACA was upheld.
2. The Individual Mandate was ruled Constitutional, but individuals who refuse to comply would pay a tax.
3. The Medicaid provision (expansion) was limited but not invalidated.
4. Because the whole ACA was deemed constitutional, the provision requiring insurers to cover young adults until they are 26 survives as well.

Throughout the days and weeks that follow, University of Minnesota health policy experts will discuss the ruling and its impact with regional media.

To catch up on all the latest regional media coverage featuring the University of Minnesota health policy experts you trust visit our Storify page.

Family meals: Good for the kids and good for you!

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A new study published this month in the journal Appetite shows that parents who eat more family meals with their kids eat more fruits and veggies.

To learn more about the results, we talked with Jerica Berge, Ph.D., a University of Minnesota Medical School assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health. Berge is the lead author of the latest study, which is part of the larger, ongoing study Project EAT study examining the eating patterns of middle and high school students enrolled in Minneapolis and St. Paul school districts.

Here's what Berge had to say:

Q: Why research how family meals affect mom and dad?
Berge: We knew that adolescents and children who have regular family meals are less likely to be overweight and obese. They eat more healthfully overall in terms of consuming more fruits and vegetables, consuming less sugar-sweetened beverages, and being less likely to engage in extreme weight control behaviors that often lead to eating disorders. So, we wanted to know if the same was true for parents.

Q: What did your research find?
Berge: More frequent family meals are associated with a higher fruit and vegetable intake for moms and dads. When eating more meals together with family, dads also ate less fast food, while moms participated in less unhealthy dieting and binge eating.

Q: How many more fruits and vegetables were parents eating?
Berge: Overall, moms and dads went from eating 2-3 servings of fruits and vegetables per day to eating 4+ servings per day. In families that ate zero meals together as compared to families that ate meals together 5+ times per week, moms specifically went from 3 to 4+ servings of fruits and vegetables. Dads went from 2 ½ servings to 4. That's a total of 1-2 more servings each day for mom or dad!

Q: So, now I know eating with my family means I'll likely eat more fruits and veggies. What now?
Berge: The take home message is that family meals may benefit everyone in the family. Less fast food for dads, less unhealthy eating for moms and more fruits and vegetables for everyone means better health all around. Don't just plan family meals to help the kids; do it for the whole family, including yourself.

(Photo courtesy of Stefano Chiarelli via creative commons license.)

Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act will have a big impact

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Later this month, the Supreme Court will hand down its ruling on the Affordable Care Act.

In their ruling, the Supreme Court could do one of three things:

1. Uphold the Affordable Care Act;
2. Uphold the Affordable Care Act in part;
3. Strike down the Affordable Care Act completely.

Regardless of the direction of their decision, the ruling will have big consequences for the general public, hospitals and clinics and health care professionals.

But what would the true impact be at both the state and federal levels? To find out we asked two leading experts within the School of Public Health's Division of Health Policy and Management.

The Impact at the Federal Level
According to health economics expert Jean Abraham, Ph.D., the impact on a federal level could look something like this:

1. Uphold the Affordable Care Act - The federal government will continue on as planned with the mandates set forth in the Affordable Care Act.
2. Uphold the Affordable Care Act in part - The effectiveness of the Affordable Care Act for reducing the number of uninsured will be in question. Many economists believe the individual mandate needs to go hand-in-hand with other types of insurance market provisions.
3. Strike down the Affordable Care Act completely - This will have a negative effect on reducing the number of uninsured people in the U.S. By 2016, there will be an estimated 56 million uninsured Americans and the provisions within the Affordable Care Act could help reduce this number by 30 million.

The Impact at the State Level
According to health policy expert Lynn Blewett, Ph.D., the impact on the state of Minnesota could look something like this:

1. Uphold the Affordable Care Act in part - It will be a slight setback but the state would likely continue to implement the exchange in an effort to find a large enough pool and healthy pool in the exchange to make the insurance premiums reasonably priced.
2. Strike down the Affordable Care Act completely - It would be a devastating blow to a state like Minnesota because of all the energy, effort and federal funding that went into creating and implementing the programs under the Affordable Care Act.
3. Uphold the Affordable Care Act - The state of Minnesota will continue on as planned with the mandates set forth in the Affordable Care Act.

No matter what side of the issue you're on, one thing is clear: many Americans will be affected by the Supreme Court's decision.

For more on the potential impacts of the Supreme Court's decision at the federal and state levels, watch videos of both Abraham and Blewett. And make sure to check back here for more updates on the Affordable Care Act ruling as they develop.

Photo by Phil Roeder

How to make the most out of your Minnesota summer

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With warm weather upon us, it is tempting to shed all inhibitions and wholeheartedly enjoy the summer sun, but with the summer heat, unfortunately, comes the risk of injury.
But, fear not! There are ways to prepare.

We checked in with Toben Nelson, an assistant professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota to get the scoop on some simple tips on insuring a safe and healthy summer.

1.Make sure you're using the right equipment, technique and supervision
Having proper instruction and supervision for the young ones is crucial in preventing injuries this summer. "Goofing around" is a common reason for injury, so parents or anyone supervising should make sure that kids are making good decisions, even though that is often easier said than done.

"If involved in any sort of recreational summer fun, it is very important to make sure that the equipment you are using is in working order," recommends Nelson.

It is also important that both children and adults are aware of their surroundings and are paying attention to the quality of their equipment, which can be anything from helmets to life jackets to volleyballs. Always check to make sure your bike helmet is fit appropriately for your head size and that life jackets are worn by all children and are a U.S. Coast Guard-approved Type I, II, III, or V jacket.

2. Protect yourself from the elements
It seems simple, but sunscreen and protective clothing are your best defense when avoiding sunburn. With a son who experienced his first major sunburn, Nelson understands the importance of keeping kids protected from the sun.

Paying attention to the temperature, keeping hydrated and avoiding caffeinated beverages or foods with high sodium content that can dehydrate are good defenses to combating the summer heat when being out and about.

3.Enjoy the Minnesota summer!
The last bit of advice Dr. Nelson had to offer was to encourage people to be out and enjoying everything the summer has to offer, but to also be cautious and prepare in advance for the potential problems that may arise.

"There are so many great things to be involved with in our state, one of the worst things you can do to yourself this summer is not take advantage of them and be active outdoors."

Disney joins the nation's fight against obesity

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Recent news that Disney has put the kibosh on junk food advertisements on their website, TV and radio stations seems on par with other efforts aimed at improving children's health, but will the move really make an impact on children's eating behaviors?

According to Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., a University of Minnesota School of Public Health epidemiologist and principal investigator of Project EAT, the answer is yes.

"There's a reason that snack foods and sugary cereals are on the shelf closest to a small child's line of vision," said Neumark-Sztainer. "It's the same reason these foods are advertised during the day. Children - like adults - are influenced by advertising."

Neumark-Sztainer believes that by regulating food advertising on shows targeting children, Disney is taking a role in educating children on making better food choices. Because sugary and high calorie options aren't being promoted, Disney is making a move to expose children to one less promotion of unhealthy food.

With the new criteria, Disney will scrutinize the calorie count of any food advertised on its channels. Though this won't eliminate all junk food from being advertised, it will ensure that the food promoted is within a healthy calorie range for young children.

"I think Disney's self-regulation is a positive move," said Neumark-Sztainer. "While there will be alternative media channels where kids are exposed to advertising of unhealthy food choices and the impact of the company's move is difficult to quantify, the effort is still a positive step."

42% of American adults will be obese by 2030, study says

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Image: LA Times LogoThe ranks of obese Americans are expected to swell even further in the coming years, rising from 36% of the adult population today to 42%. Robert Jeffery, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, discusses how policymakers can help prevent increased obesity.

Read on LA Times

Access to health care declines in Wisconsin, nationwide

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Image: AHC LogoAccess to basic health care for adults declined in Wisconsin and nearly every state from 2000 to 2010, according to a study released Monday. Lynn Blewett, School of Public Health, explains that unless there is a major change, it is very likely these trends could continue.

Read on Milwuakee Journal Sentinel

University of Minnesota, Fairview to build new outpatient clinic

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Image: Pioneer Press LogoThe U of M and Fairview plan on building a $1 million outpatient clinic. Peter Bitterman, Medical School, Masonic Cancer Center and University of Minnesota Physicians, and Russell Luepker, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, discuss details of the new clinic.

Read on Pioneer Press

Evidence behind autism drugs may be biased

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Image: AHC LogoDoctors' belief that certain antidepressants can help to treat repetitive behaviors in kids with autism may be based on incomplete information. Tatyana Shamiliyan, School of Public Health, talks about the problem with current clinical research policy.

Read on Reuters and MSNBC

A health expert talks binge drinking just in time for Spring Jam

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Image: MN Daily LogoWith Spring Jam festivities in full swing, it is important to understand that binge drinking can be very harmful. Toben Nelson, School of Public Health, discusses the dangers of binge drinking and what colleges should do to address the issue.

Read on MN Daily

Teens who check the scale frequently may have an unhealthy preoccupation with weight

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Image: Medical Xpress LogoTeens who weigh themselves several times per week may be at risk for unhealthy weight control practices and poor psychological well-being. Virginia Quick, School of Public Health, explains the study and why the number on the scale isn't always the measure of overall health.

Read on Medical Xpress

Smaller claims raise profits for health plans

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Image: Star Tribune LogoMinnesota's insurers saw operating profits of $355 million in 2011, the best in several years. Roger Feldman, School of Public Health, explains that we're seeing not just some stability, but a little bit of a bounce back.

Read on Star Tribune

Drugs of Limited Benefit Against Urine Leakage

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Image: AHC LogoThere is new data to show that drugs for urge urinary incontinence improve quality of life or have differences in comparative efficacy. Tatyana Shamliyan, School of Public Health, discusses what the new data means for people.

Read on MedPage Today

Farm to school documentary makes food the star

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Image: AHC LogoA screening of the documentary Farm to School, which makes food the star, was held at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. One of the benefits of the farm to school program is that students see where their food comes from.

Read on AgriNews

MnTAP helps businesses save money

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Image: MN Daily LogoIn 2011, businesses in Minnesota saved more than $3 million by implementing solutions designed to reduce water use, waste and energy costs with the help of an outreach program, MnTap, from the University of Minnesota's School of Public Health.

Read on MN Daily

Could cutting 64 calories a day reverse the childhood obesity epidemic?

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Sixty-four calories. That's the number a new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found children in the U.S. must eliminate to help slash childhood obesity by 2020.

If children don't either decrease their calorie intake or increase physical activity - or both - more than 20% will be obese by 2020 and the average U.S. child will be nearly four pounds heavier than a child of the same age in 2007-2008.

But could 64 calories really be the magic number to preventing such scenarios?

To find out we asked University of Minnesota School of Public Health epidemiologist Jamie Stang, Ph.D. Her answer: 64 calories is a start, but there probably is no magic bullet.

"Childhood obesity isn't a problem with a quick-fix solution," Stang said. "It will take the cooperation of parents, educators, health care providers, schools, communities, the food industry, policymakers and the teens themselves, all working together to create more opportunities for healthful eating. Some children may also need to achieve a higher calorie reduction or exercise output than others, and for families with sedentary kids, 64 calories they may be disappointed in the lack of weight loss.

So how can children eliminate these calories from their diets? According to Stang:

• Consume a variety of nutrient-dense foods and beverages among the basic food groups.
• Choose foods with limited saturated and trans fats, cholesterol, added sugars and salt.
• Meet recommended intakes within energy needs by adopting a balanced eating pattern.
• Engage in regular physical activity and reduce sitting for extended periods of time.
• Have approximately 60 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity activities daily.

Drugs help some women with incontinence

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Image: AHC LogoSome women with a leaky bladder can get better using approved medications, but the medications aren't for everyone. Tatyana Shamliyan and Robert Kane, School of Public Health, talk about the findings of the study.

Read on Reuters, Web MD, US News & World Report

Urinary Incontinence Drugs May Be More Trouble Than They're Worth

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Image: US News and World Report LogoFor women with urinary incontinence, the available treatments may cause more problems than they solve and many stop taking the medications. Researchers from the U of M School of Public Health analyzed data from 94 studies to see how well the available drugs worked.

Read on US News & World Report

'Pink slime' in your meat? Labels to tell you, USDA says

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Image: MSNBC LogoFederal agriculture officials have agreed to allow several meat producers to put 'pink slime' (lean finely textured beef) on its labels. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, talks about the benefits of using lean finely textured beef in products.

Read on MSNBC

New skin cancer study highlights U of M tanning bed research

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Researchers at the Mayo Clinic have found melanoma rates among young women are eight-times higher than they were 40 years ago. Though the study didn't look at what caused the melanoma, researchers suggested indoor tanning as the main factor.

Citing a University of Minnesota study that found a strong correlation between tanning-device use and melanoma, the Mayo Clinic researchers said they are sure that ultra-violet radiation is linked to cancer in a big way, especially tanning bed exposure.

In 2010, researchers at the U of M's School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center found that people who use any type of tanning bed for any amount of time are 74 percent more likely to develop melanoma.

"We found that it didn't matter the type of tanning device used; there was no safe tanning device," said DeAnn Lazovich, Ph.D., at the time of her study's release. "We also found - and this is new data - that the risk of getting melanoma is associated more with how much a person tans and not the age at which a person starts using tanning devices. Risk rises with frequency of use, regardless of age, gender, or device,"

Click here to see an interview with Dr. Lazovich.

A health care ruling not apt to end Minn.'s reform efforts

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Image: Star Tribune LogoU.S. Supreme Court could pull the plug on all or part of the federal health care law. Lynn Blewett, School of Public Health, explains that Minnesota could then assemble their own expanded coverage systems should the Supreme Court strike down the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Read on Star Tribune

Now revised, controversial bird-flu research gets publication go-ahead from U.S. govt. panel

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The National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity (NSABB) has reversed course and now supports publication of controversial research studies showing how scientists in the Netherlands and Wisconsin created new, easy-to-spread forms of bird flu in the lab.

The move comes as researchers partially revise their research to exclude details that could be used by bioterrorists to potentially create a pandemic. The NSABB had originally said publishing full details of the research would be too risky.

University of Minnesota professor Michael Osterholm, Ph.D., serves on the NSABB and had been directly involved with the original recommendation for redaction.

According to Osterholm, the H5N1 strains that were created in the lab could lead to research that improves pandemic preparedness, but he and others were concerned that releasing details of the research created a very real risk of a human pandemic -- by accident or intentional release of the virus.

"These papers really represent a seminal moment in life sciences," Osterholm said before a Feb. 2 New York Academy of Sciences debate about the issue. Osterholm is director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy and at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. "We now have really been confronted with examples of where the science itself -- which is very important in moving forward for the public's health -- also poses potential risk for nefarious actions or even situations where this virus might escape from the laboratory."

Read the full story from the U of M's Center for Infectious Disease Research & Policy.

Controversial Bird Flu Research Safe To Publish

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Image: RedOrbit LogoA panel of US science research experts reversed its decision on banning the publication of the research that created the deadly H5N1 virus. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, explains he is worried about a "garage scientist" trying to replicate the research.

Read on RedOrbit

Skin cancer rates rising rapidly among young adults

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Image: AHC LogoMelanoma rates among young women are eight-times higher than they were 40 years ago. Research from the U of M School of Public Health explains that people who use any type of tanning device, for any amount of time, are 74 percent more likely to develop a melanoma.

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Read on Chicago Tribune

Farm to School film kicks off Public Health Week film festival in Minneapolis

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Image: AHC LogoThe University of Minnesota School of Public Health Film Festival is being held on April 2-6. The film festival, part of the nationally-observed Public Health Week, has a lineup spanning a spectrum from documentary films to vintage sex ed comedic shorts.

Read on Twin Cities Daily Planet

Jonathan Gruber, Health Care's Mr. Mandate

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Image: New York Times LogoSeveral states are looking to Jonathan Gruber, a numbers wizard at M.I.T., to help them figure out how to fix their health care systems. Jean Abraham, School of Public Health, explains how Mr. Gruber's work is now used as a benchmark.

Read on New York Times

Bird flu: how two mutant strains led to an international controversy

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Image: AHC LogoThe debate on whether or not to publish details about the mutant strain of H5N1 is heading to Washington. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, explains how this debate will determine how future controversial studies are handled.

Read on The Guardian

Fridley's cancer 'cluster' draws celebrity crusader

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Image: Star Tribune Logo1,537 cancers were reported in Fridley from 2000 to 2009, compared with the "expected" number of 1,402 for a city that size. Brad Carlin, School of Public Health, discusses the potential of "cancer clusters" in Minnesota.

Read on Star Tribune

Study: Higher co-pays cut into medications for kids with asthma

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Image: AHC LogoA recent study showed children with asthma don't always get enough of their medications. Pinar Karaca-Mandic, School of Public Health, explains that privately insured children are having trouble accessing their medications due to high out-of-pocket costs.

Read on Star Tribune, MPR, Pioneer Press, MinnPost, News Medical, Science Codex, Medscape, Grand Forks Herald, Family Practice News. Health News Digest and Pediatric SuperSite

Minn. businesses, patients anxious for health care ruling

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Image: Star Tribune LogoBudgets, health decisions hinge on high court's verdict on health care law. Lynn Blewett, School of Public Health, talks about the potential impact the final decision could have on small businesses.

Read on Star Tribune

Breast Cancer Margins

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Image: AHC LogoDespite current treatment and technology many U.S. surgeons re-operate to get a breast cancer-free margin. There was recent debate about the surgical margins and School of Public Health researchers explained that surgeons should aim or "margins as wide as possible."

Read on ABC News, Cancer Network and Daily RX

PoliGraph: Hegseth's medical device claim inconclusive

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Image: MPR LogoPete Hegseth, one of Sen. Amy Klobuchar's potential opponents this fall recently wrote an opinion piece on the effects of the new health care law in Minnesota. Roger Feldman, School of Public Health, discusses Hegseth's claims.

Read on MPR

Budget Constraints Delay Outbreak Investigation Centers

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Image: AHC LogoLack of federal funds will likely postpone the creation of five centers proposed to improve foodborne illness outbreak investigations. Craig Hedberg, School of Public Health, explains that budget constraints likely played a large role in the decision from the CDC.

Read on Food Safety News

Eating red meat associated with higher risk of death

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Image: MinnPost LogoEating red meat is associated with a greater risk of death. Kristin Anderson, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, discusses a study that showedan association between the consumption of barbecued and grilled meat and pancreatic cancer.

Read on MinnPost

Health beat: When rise in health coverage isn't good

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Image: Star Tribune LogoIn 2011, for the first time, American Indians showed a sharp increase in health insurance coverage and were no longer uninsured at a significantly higher rate than Minnesotans overall. Kathleen Call, School of Public Health, explains that these findings are only the start of her research.

Read on Star Tribune

Public health infectious disease budget

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Image: AHC LogoRecently proposed budget cuts in the U.S. could have devastating effects on the public health system. John Finnegan, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, talks about how federal funding has helped create national medication reserves and increase efficiency of public health work.

Read on Homeland Security News Wire

Uninsured rate for young Minn. adults drops to 17%

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Image: AHC LogoRecent state and federal laws may be helping young adults find insurance coverage, even as the overall uninsured rate remains high. Kathleen Call, School of Public Health, explains the findings of her study and how there hasn't been many changes in the past couple years.

Read on Star Tribune, Twin Cities Business and MPR

Amateur Biologists Are New Fear in Making a Mutant Flu Virus

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Image: New York Times LogoThe World Health Organization recommended last week in favor of publishing the results of the H5N1 flu. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, talks about the potential for a garage scientist attempting to create a replica of the deadly virus.

Read on New York Times

Lab-engineered bird flu virus may be less deadly than thought -- or not

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Image: Washington Post LogoThe lab-engineered H5N1 bird flu virus whose recipe the U.S. government doesn't want published may be less lethal than originally reported. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses different aspects of the debate over the virus.

Read on Washington Post

Study: Quarter of reproductive-age women lack access to insurance

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Image: MPR LogoNew research from the U of M suggests more reproductive-age women lack access to health insurance. Katy Backes Kozhimannil, School of Public Health, explains that one finding was that 10 percent of pregnant women reported being uninsured.

Listen on MPR

Trans Fats May Raise Stroke Risk in Older Women

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Image: US News and World Report LogoA new study found a 39 percent increased risk of stroke among certain women who ate the highest amount of trans fat. The study analyzed trans fat intake data from the School of Public Health's dietary database.

Read on US News & World Report

Youth sports: Do they prevent obesity?

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Image: AHC LogoParents like to believe that signing the kids up for soccer, hockey and other sports can keep them lean and fit. Toben Nelson, School of Public Health, explains how sweet rewards and sugary beverages lead to kids taking in more calories than they're burning.

Read on Chicago Tribune

Bird Flu: More Common, Less Deadly than We Thought?

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Image: AHC LogoA new study suggests H5N1 is more easily spread and far less deadly than scientists believed. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, explains that the fatality rate of H5N1 is at least as high as the World Health Organization has put it, between 30% and 60%.

Read on TIME and Huffington Post

Students use team approach to health care in Phillips clinic

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Image: AHC LogoStudent volunteers from the School of Public Health, Medical School, School of Nursing and College of Pharmacy use an inter-professional approach, combining their skills, to find the best care for patients at a free, student-run clinic in the Phillips Neighborhood of Minneapolis.

Read on Twin Cities Daily Planet

Study: Soft Drinks May Double Your Risk for Pancreatic Cancer

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Image: AHC LogoThe U of M School of Public Health found drinking two or more regular soft drinks per week may almost double your risk of pancreatic cancer. Research published this week speculates the sugar overload from regular soda triggers insulin production that fuels cancer cell growth.

Watch on KSTP

Read on ABC 6

Plans report healthy profits despite new cost demands

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Image: American Medical Association LogoIn 2011, the nation's largest publicly traded health companies were able to keep profits up despite new requirements on medical spending. Jon Christianson, School of Public Health, discusses what the future of insurance coverage in the health care industry will look like.

Read on American Medical News

Plans for front-of-package nutrition information follows disappointment over reading of Nutrition Facts labels

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Image: AHC LogoWith few consumers actually reading the Nutrition Facts, several ideas are floated for front-of-package labels that have clearer information. Dan Graham, School of Public Health, explains that consumers only spend about one second looking at nutritional information on packaging.

Read on LA Times and FOX 40

'Downton Abbey' gets the flu -- but does it get it right?

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Image: MinnPost LogoThe years 1918 and 1919 were marked in Britain, as in the United States and elsewhere around the world, with one of history's most virulent and deadly flu pandemics. Michael Osterholm and Richard Danila, School of Public Health, talk about the accuracy of a television shows depiction of the pandemic.

Read on MinnPost

Ind. measles outbreak, traced to Super Bowl, illustrates disease's quick rate of transmission

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Image: Washington Post LogoIndiana is battling its second measles outbreak in two years, even though its vaccination rate exceeds the national average. Kristen Ehresmann, School of Public Health, explains why the Super Bowl provided the perfect atmosphere for the disease to spread.

Read on Washington Post

Millions of Women Are Unaware They Have Arterial Disease

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Image: AHC LogoBetween 4 and 5 million women in the US have peripheral artery disease but few are diagnosed and fewer receive adequate treatment. Alan Hirsch, Medical School, School of Public Health and University of Minnesota Physicians, discusses raising awareness about the disease.

Read on Web MD, MSN, Forbes, US News & World Report and MedPage Today

Mixed progress made by US government and schools to improve food marketing influencing children's diets

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Image: AHC LogoNew research shows that schools have had mixed results in implementing changes in schools to support a healthful diet for children. Mary Story, School of Public Health, helped conduct a report in 2005 to check in on the progress of offering healthy foods and beverages.

Read on Medical Xpress and News Medical

President Obama's Medicare cuts don't cut it

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Image: AHC LogoPresident Obama released the 2013 budget recently and it relies on the same proposals as in previous years. Roger Feldman and Bryan Dowd, School of Public Health, wrote a report which explains that competitive bidding can save more money without endangering the care seniors.

Read on The Hill's Congress Blog

Health beat: U asks why race matters in cancer

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Image: Star Tribune LogoJean Forster, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, explains how three doctoral students and three post-graduates to study new ways to combat cancer-related health disparities with the money from a $2.2 million federal grant that was recently won.

Read on Star Tribune

Thousands of children will join athletes, Michelle Obama at Let's Move event in Des Moines

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Image: AHC LogoFirst lady Michelle Obama has a new campaign called "Let's Move," which aims to make Iowa the healthiest state by 2016. The "blue zone" concept, a large part of the health initiative, was developed by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.

Read on The Republic

Curing Diabetes: How Type 2 Became an Accepted Lifestyle

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Image: AHC LogoThe American Diabetes Association says that maintaining normal blood sugar without medication for at least a year could be considered a "complete remission." Sarah Gollust, School of Public Health, explains some reasons why there is a stigma against type 2 diabetes.

Read on The Atlantic

Documents from Michigan Further Identify Taco Bell

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Image: AHC LogoThe Michigan Department of Community Health named Taco Bell as the mystery fast food chain linked to an outbreak of Salmonella infection last year. Craig Hedberg, School of Public Health, discusses the results of the report and how they relate to Taco Bell.

Read on Food Safety News

What should I know about seeking U.S. medical care?

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Image: AHC LogoMany people now are choosing to take part in medical tourism in order to find the best care. Leigh Turner, College of Pharmacy, School of Public Health and Center for Bioethics, explains that people need to do their research to find the best deal.

Read on The Globe and Mail

Emotion runs high at H5N1 debate

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Image: Nature LogoResearchers and public health officials recently gathered in hopes of narrowing the divide within the scientific community over the debate of the H5N1 flu creation. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses the impact of this research and the debate will have.

Read on Nature

Yo-yo dieting not tied to early death: study

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Image: Reuters LogoDieters who repeatedly lose weight and then gain it back aren't at higher risk of early death than people who don't "yo-yo diet." Simone French, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, explains that the study shows that people shouldn't be afraid to keep trying to lose weight.

Read on Reuters, FOX News and Toronto Star

Omega-3s tied to lower risk of heart arrhythmia

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Image: AHC LogoIn a new study people with the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood were 30 percent less likely to develop an irregular heartbeat in the future. Alvaro Alonso, School of Public Health, discusses what the study's results mean.

Read on Reuters, FOX News and Health News

Docs Urge Feds to Regulate 'Toxic' Sugar

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Image: AHC LogoAdded sugars are as much a threat to public health as alcohol and tobacco, and should be regulated in a similar fashion. Mary Story, School of Public Health, discusses how there needs to be stronger evidence before the amount of sugar in foods is legally regulated.

Read on MedPage Today

Restaurant Chain A: To Name or Not to Name

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Image: AHC LogoThe CDC and FDA was withholding the name of a restaurant chain linked to a 10-state outbreak of Salmonella in 2011. Craig Hedberg, School of Public Health, explains that revealing the name of an outbreak source can create complications for researchers.

Read on Food Safety News

Flu Work Akin to Nuclear-Bomb Experiments, Board Says

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Image: AHC LogoMichael Osterholm, School of Public Health, and experts on bioterrorism asked the two labs that created the virus to hold off on sharing the results until the scientific community could agree on a way to make sure the information got into the right hands--and not into the wrong hands.

Read on National Journal

U's health enterprise will get external review

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Image: AHC LogoThe University of Minnesota's Academic Health Center will get an external review. John Finnegan, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, talks about the reasons for the external review.

Read on Star Tribune, MPR, Twin Cities Business and MN Daily

Would you cut back on soda if you had to pay a tax on it?

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Image: Star Tribune LogoProponents of a soda tax say it could cut back on obesity and premature deaths, but that's based on many assumptions. Roger Feldman, School of Public Health, explains that a lot of the test conducted to predict the outcome of the tax have been on the conservative side.

Read on Star Tribune

Office-dwellers stand up to 'sitting disease'

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Image: Star Tribune LogoA Mayo-U of M study tests whether small increases in activity, like sitting less at work, can improve health. Mark Pereira, School of Public Health, discusses how this is part of a larger research study, which looks at the way lifestyle changes could improve health and wellness.

Read on Star Tribune, Chicago Tribune and Sun Herald

Watch on KARE 11 and WCCO

Researchers untangling link between hunger and obesity

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Image: MPR LogoToday, some people who struggle to feed their families are actually obese. Mary Story, School of Public Health, explains that because of access problems parents who struggle to get enough food eat fewer fruits and vegetables and drink more sugar-sweetened beverages.

Listen on MPR

Massachusetts Health Reform: How It Fared In 2010

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Image: AHC LogoMassachusetts's health reform bill, which provided the template for the federal Affordable Care Act, went into effect in 2006. Sharon Long, School of Public Health, talks about the results of a statewide survey she conducted on the health reform.

Read on Health Affairs

Wisconsin Scientist Says H5N1 Flu Strain He Created Is Less Dangerous

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Image: AHC LogoA Wisconsin virology team that created a more contagious form of bird flu did not produce a highly lethal superflu. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, explains there are concerns both about the organisms and about how you manufacture them.

Read on New York Times, USA Today, and Scientific American

Don't be lulled by mild flu season

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Image: AHC LogoThis winter's flu season has been mild, but the usual flu peak comes next month, so it's not over yet. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, talks about the different flu strains that doctors are seeing so far this year.

Read on USA Today and The Economist

Bird flu research halted to ensure safety of experiments

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Image: AHC Logo39 scientists agreed Friday to halt their research for 60 days to allow time to assure the public the experiments are safe. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses how H5N1 is one of the most virulent known human infectious diseases.

Read on Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

'Food insecurity' high among Twin Cities parents

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Image: MinnPost LogoNew research from the School of Public Health found food insecurity in Minnesota is almost four times higher than previously believed and more than two-and-a-half times the national average.

Read on MinnPost

Million-dollar Mobile Medical Unit wows emergency medical conference

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Image: AHC LogoJill DeBoer, Academic Health Center, and Jane Braun, School of Public Health, talk about the components of the Mobil Medical Unit and how the unit is especially geared to fill in if a critical-access hospital becomes disabled or overwhelmed.

Read on Duluth News Tribune

More labs close to deadly bird flu mutations

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Image: Reuters LogoAn international debate over whether to censor new research on bird flu may soon prove academic. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses the dangers of publishing details of the research.

Read on Reuters

Scab Check for Poultry to Be Scrapped Under Food-Safety Rule

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Image: AHC LogoThe U.S. would increase oversight of poultry processors' sanitary practices and contamination controls to potentially prevent 5,200 foodborne illnesses a year. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, talks about how historic this proposal is for the poultry system.

Read on Bloomberg

A novel strategy to reduce farm runoff will be tested starting in Minnesota

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Image: AHC LogoMinnesota will play a leading role in a pilot project that will focus on land conservation and preserving water quality ahead of crop yields. Deborah Swackhamer, School of Public Health, talks about what the project hopes to accomplish.

Read on Physorg

WHO will take a role in solving issued raised by bird flu studies controversy

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Image: AHC LogoMichael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses the World Health Organization's comments about taking a role in helping sort through an international scientific controversy over two bird flu studies that the U.S. government deemed too dangerous to publish in full.

Read on Winnipeg Free Press

Higher LDL Level Linked to Lower Incidence of Afib

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Image: AHC LogoA recent study found that lower LDL cholesterol levels are associated with developing atrial fibrillation. Faye Lopez, School of Public Health, discusses the potential reasons for the inverse relationship.

Read on MedPage Today

Unhealthy teen dieting chapter 2: signs of progress in today's youth

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Image: AHC LogoU of M highlighted a new study from Project Eat, showing a drop in unhealthy dieting behaviors when comparing teens from 1999 with those from 2010. Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, School of Public Health, talks about the consistency of the study's finding.

Read on Star Tribune, KSTP, MinnPost and Wahpeton Daily News

More evidence that routine PSA screening doesn't reduce cancer deaths

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Image: MinnPost LogoTimothy Wilt, Medical School, and Timothy Church, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, discuss that annual screening for prostate cancer with the PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood test doesn't reduce men's risk of dying from the disease.

Read on MinnPost

Why is smoking more harmful for women?

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Image: AHC LogoA recent study, conducted by Rachel Huxley, School of Public Health, revealed that even though women tend to smoke fewer cigarettes than their male counterparts, they are at a 25% greater risk of smoking related health conditions.

Read on Times of India

Waukon native Dr. Michael Osterholm shares his views on recent reports on the effectiveness of vaccines

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Image: AHC LogoUnlike the cure for the common cold, there are some remedies available to fight influenza. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, explains that vaccines that are the best intervention available for seasonal influenza.

Read on Waukon Standard

Teens' fad diets can lead to putting on weight later

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Image: AHC LogoResearchers followed local students over a decade and found that those who tried risky diets in their adolescent years were likely to gain more weight by their 20s. Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, School of Public Health, talks about the motives for conducting the study.

Read on Star Tribune and LA Times

Babies May Be Getting Bigger, but Questions Remain

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Image: AHC LogoThe weights and lengths of babies born in southwestern Ohio have been growing in recent decades, but no link to obesity later in childhood was seen. Ellen Demerath, School of Public Health, explains a baby born in the 1930s would not have been considered a big kid today.

Read on FOX News and Reuters

Minnesota experts name the most significant health-related events of 2011

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Image: MinnPost LogoSteven Miles, Center for Bioethics, Medical School and University Physicians, and Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discuss the most significant events ("good" or "bad") in their field of expertise in 2011.

Read on MinnPost

Concerns grow over salmonella that survives antibiotics

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Image: AHC LogoThe frequency of outbreaks linked to antibiotic-resistant salmonella is rising. Craig Hedberg, School of Public Health, discusses how banning specific strains of salmonella could cause logistical problems in the food industry.

Read on Denver Post

Should Science Journals Publish H5N1 Flu News?

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Image: AHC LogoThe U.S. government asked scientific journals not to publish the details of experiments on the deadly H5N1. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, explains that the rapid spread of an escaped flu virus would make it more dangerous than other deadly pathogens.

Read on TIME, Washington Post, CNN and Star Tribune

Fears grow over lab-bred flu

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Image: Nature LogoScientists call for stricter biosafety measures for dangerous avian-influenza variants.. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, explains that influenza presents a very difficult challenge because if it ever were to escape, it is one that would quickly go round the world.

Read on Nature News

Health reform pilot program includes 3 Minnesota groups

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Image: Star Tribune LogoThree Minnesota health care organizations will take part in a federal pilot program designed to improve the quality of health care for seniors. Roger Feldman, School of Public Health, discusses the challenge of widespread reform.

Read on Star Tribune

Indoor tanning operators say they're getting burned by tax

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Image: Star Tribune LogoMany tanning salons have had to close since the federal government imposed a tax on them, in July of 2010. DeAnn Lazovich, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, talks about how many salons are putting profit over people's health.

Read on Star Tribune

Tanning beds tied to second type of skin cancer

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Image: AHC LogoTanning beds have already been linked skin cancer and now new research shows they can also raise the odds of developing the most common form of the disease. Research from DeAnn Lazovich, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, explains the increase in developing melanoma.

Read on MSNBC, Reuters and Yahoo!

U of M research: Sports not enough to stop childhood obesity

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Image: KARE 11 LogoPlaying organized sports can help, but its not the magic bullet when it comes to fighting childhood obesity. Toben Nelson, School of Public Health, talks about how youth sports alone might not be enough to combat the issue.

Read on KARE 11

Watch on WCCO

Milking It: Ron Paul Wants Choice on Raw Milk

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Image: ABC News LogoJeff Bender, College of Veterinary Science, and William Hueston, College of Veterinary Medicine and School of Public Health, talk about how Ron Paul's push to legalize the sale of raw milk could lead to people drinking contaminated milk.

Read on ABC News

How to talk to kids about weight issues?

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Image: AHC LogoWhile childhood obesity looms large, so do stigmas against kids who struggle with their weight. Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, School of Public Health, discusses that parents need to be cognitive of the stigmas and choose their language carefully.

Read on Hindustan Times

Contagion: Controversy Erupts over Man-Made Pandemic Avian Flu Virus

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Image: AHC LogoTwo teams of scientists have independently constructed a deadly strain of flu. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses the need to work on agents that yield important information without compromising our safety and security.

Read on Scientific American

Riva Greenberg: How 24 Women Live Successfully With Diabetes

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Image: Huffington Post LogoWomen, who have each found a way to successfully manage a career and/or their family and their diabetes tell their story. Birgitta Rice, School of Public Health, discusses her invention to help people with diabetes and her life with.

Read on Huffington Post

Review calls for separate Med School dean, health sciences VP

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Image: MN Daily LogoRuth Lindquist, School of Nursing, John Finnegan, School of Public Health, and Peter Bitterman, Medical School, Masonic Cancer Center and University of Minnesota Physicians, discuss the pros and cons of having a Medical School dean and an AHC vice president.

Read on MN Daily

Kaler says an external AHC review could be on the way

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Image: MN Daily LogoPresident Eric Kaler is strongly considering an external review of the Academic Health Center. Michael Oakes, School of Public Health, and Colin Campbell, College of Pharmacy, discuss the outcomes of the initial internal review.

Read on MN Daily

Youth sports are just the first step

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Image: Star Tribune LogoAlmost half of athletes 12 to 17 are overweight despite the activity, according to a U of M research. Toben Nelson, School of Public Health, discusses that youth sport needs to be the next major area to focus on for preventing childhood obesity.

Read on Star Tribune

The case for taxing soft drinks

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Image: Star Tribune LogoAn editorial from Roger Feldman, School of Public Health, discusses the need for a tax on soft drinks, which would promote healthful behavior. Mark Pereira, School of Public Health, talks about how people who drink multiple soft drinks a week are twice as likely to develop pancreatic cancer.

Read on Star Tribune

2 States Survey Nursing Home Residents To Assess Care

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Image: AHC LogoWhen choosing the right nursing home, most consumers lack one of the best sources of inside information about the facilities - from the residents themselves. Robert Kane, School of Public Health, talks about how satisfaction surveys help to give the whole story about nursing homes.

Read on Kaiser Health News

Deadly man-made strain of H5N1 bird flu virus raises controversy

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Image: AHC LogoA group of scientists are trying to publish a paper on how they created a new flu virus that could wipe out all humanity. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, talks about the importance of research like this.

Read on International Business Times , Digital Journal and Daily Mail

Tips To Avoid Overeating During the Holidays

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Image: WCCO LogoIt is often hard to safeguard yourself from overeating during the holidays. Jamie Stang, School of Public Health, talks about overeating and gives him some suggestions to keep some self control.

Listen on WCCO Radio

Exercise Programs Better Than Stents for Clogged Leg Arteries

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Image: AHC LogoPatients with clogged leg arteries are better off exercising than having a doctor place a stent in their legs to improve blood flow. Alan Hirsch, Medical School, School of Public Health and University of Minnesota Physicians, explains how many fitness programs are covered by insurance.

Read on Bloomberg Businessweek, MedPage Today, Internal Medicine News and Med India

Breast cancer group tests canned foods for BPA

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Image: MN Daily LogoBisphenol A is a potentially toxic chemical used in food packaging. Pete Raynor, School of Public Health, discusses the uncertainty of the effects that BPA exposure can have on a person's health.

Read on MN Daily

Nightlife transformed by smoking ban

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Image: AHC LogoIn the year since South Dakota voters approved expanding a ban on smoking in public places the nightlife experience has been transformed. Jean Forster, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, talks about how smoking bans haven't effected bars that much.

Read on Rapid City Journal

Love Your Body encourages healthy self-perception

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Image: AHC LogoAround 80 percent of United States women are dissatisfied with their appearance. Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, School of Public Health, explains that over one half of teenage girls and nearly one third of teenage boys "use unhealthy weight control behaviors.

Read on The Daily Pennsylvanian

Nursing homes to treat more ailments

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Image: Star Tribune LogoA pilot program by 49 state facilities aims to cut unnecessary - and costly - re-hospitalizations. Robert Kane, School of Public Health, discusses how hospitalization can leave elderly patients vulnerable to infections, falls and a form of short-term dementia.

Read on Star Tribune and Grand Forks Herald

A battle builds over breakfast

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Image: Star Tribune LogoUnder the threat of federal action, everything about kids' food, from cereal sugar levels to mascots to TV ads, is under scrutiny. Mary Story, School of Public Health, talks about how new advertising guidelines can improve children's health.

Read on Star Tribune

Stronger flu shots, more side effects

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Image: Star Tribune LogoA high-dose version of the flu vaccine, aimed at seniors, can cause short-term aches and flu-like symptoms. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, talks about the effectiveness of the flu vaccine in seniors.

Read on Star Tribune, Medical Xpress and Sun Herald

Reminder: take your HIV medication

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Image: MN Daily LogoNew technology may help HIV patients to avoid skipping a dose of their medication. Keith Horvath, School of Public Health, explains how he is using social media to help patients remember to take their medication.

Read on MN Daily

Doctors push flu shot despite study's findings

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Image: AHC LogoAlthough recent research shows that flu shot is not as effective as it used to be, most doctors still encourage patients to get the shot. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, talks about how the study showed that flu shots need to be improved, not avoided.

Read on Duluth News Tribune

Flu shot not as effective as thought (but get one anyway)

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Image: AHC LogoFlu vaccines don't work as well as previously thought, although they're still the best protection available against seasonal influenza. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses his research on the effectiveness of the current flu vaccination.

Read on MSNBC, FOX News, USA Today and MPR

Study Confirms Chest X-Rays Ineffective for Detecting Lung Cancer

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Image: AHC LogoEarly detection of cancer is often a key factor in successful treatment. Recent research from the School of Public Health and the National Cancer Institute showed that an annual chest X-ray is no more likely to turn up evidence of lung cancer than normal visits to the physician.

Read on Scientific American and LA Times

Are teens who drink pop more apt to be violent?

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Image: AHC LogoExperts caution new data, which links soda consumption and violence, saying there is no direct link between the two. Mary Story, School of Public Health, talks about how poverty plays a role in people having poor diets.

Read on Star Tribune and Grand Forks Herald

8 reasons to make time for family dinner

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Image: CNN LogoBelieve it or not, if you have a demanding job, finding time to eat with your family may actually leave you feeling less stressed. Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, School of Public Health, explains how eating family meals together keeps kids healthier.

Read on CNN

Shoppers Pay Less Attention to Nutrition Labels Than They Think

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Image: AHC LogoEven health-conscious shoppers who read nutrition labels pay much less attention to the information than they think they do. Dan Graham and Robert Jeffrey, School of Public Health, explain that consumers have short attention spans when it comes to nutrition labels.

Read on FOX News, TIME and BBC News

Proposed new food labels would rate nutrition

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Image: AHC LogoIn an effort to contain epidemic obesity, the Institute of Medicine recommended a new logo for the front of all packaged food sold in grocery stores. Mary Story, School of Public Health, explains that the labels would give consumers a quick assessment of its nutrition value

Read on San Francisco Chronicle

Disease caused a costly 4,300 amputations in Minn, study finds

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Image: MPR LogoA new study by Alan Hirsch, Medical School, School of Public Health, Lillehei Heart Institute and University of Minnesota Physicians, shows that Minnesota had more than 4,300 amputations caused by leg artery blockages from 2005 to 2008, resulting in $88 million in hospital costs.

Read on MPR

More Iron Range mesothelioma deaths found

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Image: AHC LogoThe number of Iron Rangers who died of mesothelioma has reached 82. Jeffrey Mandel and John Finnegan, School of Public Health, discusses the updates of the Taconite Study that have been found by his research team.

Read on Duluth News Tribune

Updated guideline outlines recommendations for PAD diagnosis, management

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Image: AHC LogoUpdated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with peripheral artery disease have recently been released. Alan Hirsch, Medical School, School of Public Health, Lillehei Heart Institute and University of Minnesota Physicians, talks about the impact of the new guidelines.

Read on Cardiology Today

Met Council considers legal options against 3M over chemical discharge

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Image: MPR LogoLegal actions against 3M related to discharging chemicals from wastewater treatment plants into the environment are currently being explored. Matt Simcik, School of Public Health, talks about the effects of freshwater contamination.

Read on MPR

California Bans Indoor Tanning for Minors

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Image: AHC LogoTanning beds will be illegal for California minors to use come January 1. A recent study from the U of M's Masonic Cancer Center and School of Public Health shows that people who use a tanning bed for any length of time are 74% more likely to develop melanoma.

Read on Skin Inc.

Study flags risk of daily vitamin use among older women

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Image: USA Today LogoAccording to a recent study Older women who took a daily vitamin supplement had an increased risk of dying of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Jaakko Mursu, School of Public Health, discusses his research and the findings.

Read on USA Today

'U' Expert: We Need A Better Flu Shot « CBS Minnesota

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Image: WCCO LogoHealth officials say it's a good time to get a flu shot. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, explains it's time for a new flu vaccine to keep up with the different strains that develop over time.

Listen on WCCO

Healthy diet may reduce risk of birth defects

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Image: CNN LogoWomen run a lower risk of having babies with certain birth defects if they eat a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. David Jacobs, Medical School and School of Public Health, talks about how healthy foods are better for you than supplements.

Read on CNN

Danger in the Deli? Listeria Risks Go Beyond Cantaloupe

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Image: Wall Street Journal LogoThe outbreak of listeriosis linked to cantaloupes from a Colorado farm field is heightening concerns over its presence in other foods. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses tips to avoid getting food-borne illness.

Read on Wall Street Journal

President Obama's health care law not fulfilling promise

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Image: AHC LogoThe news that health insurance premiums are again rising rapidly is the latest reminder that President Obama's health care law is producing the opposite of what it promised. Jean Abraham and Pinar Karaca-Mandic, School of Public Health, discuss the new law.

Read on New Jersey Local News

FDA plan aims to improve food safety at retail outlets

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Image: CIDRAP LogoThe U.S. FDA has announced a "Retail Food Safety Action Plan" aiming to improve how food facilities manage food safety efforts and how public health agencies oversee them. Craig Hedberg, School of Public Health, talks about the new action plan.

Read on CIDRAP News

Consumption of foods containing vitamin D drops

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Image: AHC LogoMany individuals these days may benefit from talking to their doctor about vitamin D testing, as new research from the University of Minnesota suggests that the average intake of the nutrient from food sources has declined dramatically over the past three decades.

Read on Private MD Labs

Cantaloupe outbreak is deadliest in a decade

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Image: KARE 11 LogoThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday that 72 illnesses and a number of deaths, are linked to the tainted fruit. Craig Hedberg, School of Public Health, talks about the this deadly outbreak of bacteria.

Watch on KARE 11

Cantaloupes Cause Worst Food-Borne Illness Outbreak in a Decade

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Image: AHC LogoAs many as 72 people have fallen ill and 16 have died, after eating cantaloupes that were contaminated with listeria, a dangerous bacteria. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses the outbreak and spread of listeria.


Listen on The Takeaway

PAD guidelines undergo facelift

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Image: AHC LogoUpdated guidelines for the management and treatment for peripheral artery disease have been released. Alan Hirsch, Medical School, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota Physicians and Lillehei Heart Institute, explains the new guidelines.

Read on Cardiovascular Business

U.S. Restructures $1.5B Biodefense Research Effort

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Image: AHC LogoThe U.S. Defense Department is significantly restructuring its mission to develop countermeasures against potential biological warfare agents. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses the old mission and why the U.S. is restructuring.

Read on Global Security Newswire

Researchers report 'concerning' decline in food-based vitamin D intakes

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Image: AHC LogoThe intake of vitamin D from foods has been in decline in the US population for the past 25 years. Lisa Harnack, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, explains her research and gives tips on what foods contain the most vitamin D.

Read on Nutra Ingredients-USA

The Best and Worst Words to Use When Discussing Kids' Weights

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Image: AHC LogoA new study says the words doctors use when discussing a child's weight have varying effects on a parent's attitude. Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, School of Public Health and Medical School, talks about appropriate language to use when describing a child's weight.

Read on My Health News Daily

UCF considers amnesty for student drinkers

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Image: AHC LogoDrinking has been a rite of passage for college students for generations, but many students don't know their limits. Toben Nelson, School of Public Health, talks about possible options colleges have to help curb problems associated with student drinking.

Read on Orlando Sentinel

Cantaloupe Illness And Death Toll May Keep Climbing, CDC Says

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Image: AHC LogoThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that 55 people in 14 states have become infected with one of the strains of Listeria tied to cantaloupes. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, talks about the evidence tying the outbreak to Del Monte.

Read on NPR

Del Monte pushes back in food safety case

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Image: AHC LogoDel Monte Fresh Produce, is trying to block additional restrictions on melon imports, creating a battle between the produce industry and food safety regulators. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses Del Monte being the source of the salmonella outbreak earlier this year.

Read on Bend Bulletin

Editorial: Regulation is key to food safety

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Image: Star Tribune LogoThe U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced a landmark measure to protect against a potentially deadly foodborne bacteria -- E. coli. Mike Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses the next step the USDA can take to improve food safety standards.

Read on Star Tribune

Noncommunicable diseases have sometimes been curtailed by community efforts

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Image: Washington Post LogoIn medical research, the best way to test a new treatment is the randomized controlled trial. Henry Blackburn, School of Public Health and University of Minnesota Physician, discusses clinical trial awareness efforts throughout United States history.

Read on Washington Post

Prevention prudent path to avoid lifestyle pathos

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Image: AHC LogoLifestyle changes can significantly lower the risk of being diagnosed with certain cancers. Research from the School of Public Health explains how consuming charred meat increasing the risk of getting pancreatic cancer.

Read on Maine Campus

Doctors, patients face end-of-life balancing act

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Image: AHC LogoIn past decades, advancements in medical science have made it possible to reverse the effects strokes and other medical conditions. Robert Kane, School of Public Heath, discusses doctors working with families to offer the right care for geriatric patients.

Read on Rapid City Journal

Families go for Gopher Kids study at fair

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Image: Star Tribune Logo530 families (and 850 kids) who were recruited into the study at the 2010 State Fair returned to give follow-up health information at the 2011 fair. Logan Spector, School of Public Health, talks about what made this year so successful.

Read on Star Tribune

Kids who play sports apt to be overweight

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Image: UPI LogoKids who play sports are more physically active than those who don't, but they are just as likely to be overweight. Tobben Nelson, School of Public Health, talks about the different factors that lead to athletes becoming overweight.

Read on United Press International

Professor Dishes on Vitamin D Use

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Image: FOX 9 LogoNow that the cooler weather is here and the sun is going down a little bit earlier each day, it's important to get a good dose of vitamin D. Lisa Harnack, School of Public Health, discusses vitamin D insufficiency and the foods and supplements that contain the most vitamin D.

Watch on FOX 9

Adult vitamin D consumption declines

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Image: UPI LogoResearch says vitamin D in adult diets has been on the decline for the past 25 years. Lisa Harnack, School of Public Health and Masonic Cancer Center, explains her research and offers tips on how people can increase their vitamin D intake.

Read on United Press International

Alcohol collaborative plans for next meeting

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Image: AHC Logo32 colleges and universities are busy planning for the second meeting of the Learning Collaborative on High-Risk Drinking, which looks at ways to combat high-risk drinking in college. Traci Toomey and Toben Nelson, School of Public Health, are the representatives from the U of M.

Read on The Dartmouth

What makes a healthy school lunch

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Image: UPI LogoPacking a tasty and healthy school lunch may not be as hard as some parents think. Jamie Stang, School of Public Health, give tips on healthy school lunches that are easy and affordable.

Read on United Press International

'Contagion' portrays extreme but not impossible scenario

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Image: CIDRAP LogoThe movie "Contagion" is clearly an extreme scenario, but not an impossible one, say experts who have seen the movie. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, expands on how realistic the disease outbreak in the movie is.

Read on CIDRAP News

Smokers' kids have more ear infections

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Image: AHC LogoKids whose parents smoke are more likely to get ear infections and have hearing problems, according to a new review paper. Kathleen Daly, School of Public Health, further discusses the findings of the study.

Read on MSNBC, FOX News or Health News

Biodefence since 9/11: The price of protection

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Image: Nature LogoSince the anthrax attacks in 2001, some $60 billion has been spent on biodefence in the United States. Michael Osterholm, School of Public Health, explains how plans and cost estimates are necessary in preparation for future defense efforts.

Read on Nature

U of M: Kids in sports more likely to eat unhealthy snacks

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Image: KARE 11 LogoToben Nelson, School of Public Health, explains his research that shows kids involved in sports are more likely to be consuming unhealthy snacks and fast food on a regular basis.

Read on KARE 11

How Youth Sports Makes Children Fat

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Image: Forbes LogoOriginally posted on KARE 11, Forbes reports A U of M study shows kids in sports are more likely to eat fast food and unhealthy snacks. Toben Nelson, School of Public Health, explains his research and findings.

Read on Forbes

Second Del Monte cantaloupe suit targets Oregon agency

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Image: The Packer LogoMichael Osterholm, School of Public Health, discusses the accomplishments of another food safety illness expert in the United States..

Read on The Packer

Doyle, Masters & Hedberg Named to Cargill Panel

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Image: Food Safety News LogoCraig Hedberg, School of Public Health, talks about being chosen for Cargill's expert panel that will review its enhanced ground turkey food safety program.

Read on Food Safety News