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December 16, 2008

Robert Frost Stop Motion Animation

This is the short stop motion animation that my eighth grade students made in the Robert Frost Stop Motion Project.

'The Road Less Traveled'

December 4, 2008

M&Ms Stop Motion Lesson Plan

Instructor: Clark Anderson
Lesson Topic: M&Ms Stop Motion
Grade Level: Elementary School (3rd – 4th Grade)
Length of Lesson: One Day (45 minute period(s))

Stage 1 – Desired Results
Content Standard(s):
DPS S2.1: Students will continue to use geometric and natural/organic shapes in a work of art.
DPS C2.3: Students will demonstrate an understanding of warm and cool colors in a work of art.
DPS D2.7: Students will continue to search for solutions to solve design and media problems.

Understanding (s)/goals
Students will understand:
• How to use pattern and unity to improve the look of their work.
• How warm and cool colors can strengthen a piece and give it unique qualities.
• How to create an interesting stop motion that includes other students and that is based solely on the students’ creativity.
Essential Question(s):
• What is pattern?
• What is stop motion?
• Why are students working together to complete a piece?

Student objectives (outcomes):
Students will be able to:
• Use tools and art media safely and effectively.
• Understand and use new art vocabulary: pattern, warm / cool colors, stop motion, movement, unity, shape, geometric, organic.
• Create (with help from their classmates) their own stop motion animation using M&Ms. They will have to make a monster that has some sort of pattern on its body and have it dance.

Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence
Performance Task(s):
• Comprehend basic usage tools and media.
• Understanding art vocabulary discussed with the lesson.
• Ability of applying the techniques discussed.
Other Evidence:
• Informal art vocabulary.
• Level of comprehension in their work.
Stage 3 – Learning Plan
Materials:
(Day 1)
Bags of M&Ms (About 20 Per Class)
Digital Cameras (3 – 4)
Cereal Bowls (3 – 4)
Art Posters and Book (Where The Wild Things Are)

Day 1:
Introduction:
Time: 3 - 5 minutes
Welcome the students to the classroom. Have the students sit in their seats. Tell the students to gather around in front for a quick demonstration.

Body:
Time: 3 - 5 minutes
Read to the students Where The Wild Things Are and talk about some of the patterns used in the skin of the creatures. After finishing the book tell the students about what they will be doing today.

Learning Activity:
Time: 5 - 10 minutes
Explain to the students that they will be creating their own stop motion animations where creatures that they create come to life. Their creatures must dance like they do in the book and also must have a pattern on their body like the monsters in the book. Show the students exactly how a stop motion animation is made by giving a quick demonstration. Explain to the students that they will be split up into (three/four) groups and that each group will be given a camera and a student assigned to be the camera person. Each student in the group will also be assigned a certain colored M&M and can only move their M&Ms during the stop motion project. Ask if there are any questions and have the students go to work.

Work Time:
Time: 30 minutes
Go around the room observing the students’ work, help them, and answer any questions they may have about the stop motion process.

Conclusion:
Time: 5 minutes
Have the students hand in the cameras and place all each colored M&M in front of the student it is assigned to. When everyone is seated cleaned up, and ready to leave, let them eat their colored M&Ms and send them off.

*NOTE: Compile all the images from the cameras and using the computer create their short stop motion animations. Bring them to class the next day and have the students watch and enjoy their work.


Animation Lesson Plan (Woodland Middle School)

Original Written Lesson Plan


Instructor: Clark Anderson & Andrew Nagahashi
Lesson Topic: Short Film(s) in Stop Motion
Grade Level: Middle School (7th - 8th Grade)
Length of Lesson: Four Days (45 minute period(s))


Stage 1 – Desired Results
Content Standard(s):
NVAS 1: Students will understand and apply media, techniques, and processes.
NVAS 5: Students will reflect upon and assess the characteristics and merits of their work and the work of others.

Understanding (s)/goals
Students will understand:
• How to use pattern to improve the look of their work.
• How visual texture can be used to make a surface look like another type of texture.
• How to create an interesting drawing that includes other students and that is based solely on the student's creativity.
Essential Question(s):
• What is stop motion?
• How can creating a storyboard help improve the work?
• Why are students working together to complete a piece?

Student objectives (outcomes):
Students will be able to:
• Use tools and art media safely and effectively.
• Understand and use new art vocabulary: stop motion, movement, manipulation, various computer terms, ‘frame by frame’, storyboard, and sketch.
• Develop a storyboard for which their film will be based upon.
• Create the scenes, backgrounds, characters, and props used in the film.
• Capture images (with help from their classmates) using a stop motion technique.
• Use PowerPoint (computer program) to transform images into a film.
Stage 2 – Assessment Evidence
Performance Task(s):
• Comprehend basic usage of tools and media.
• Understanding art vocabulary discussed with the lesson.
• Ability of applying the techniques discussed into solid, unique works of art.
Other Evidence:
• Informal art vocabulary.
• Level of comprehension in their work.
Stage 3 – Learning Plan
Materials:
(Day 1)
Storyboard Handouts
Computers
YouTube Videos:
Blu (Graffiti Artist)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuGaqLT-gO4
PES
http://www.eatpes.com/kaboom.html
Original Gumby Introduction (Clay Animation)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhczFRlBT2E
Nightmare Before Christmas (What’s This?)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YaxKiZfQcX8&feature=related
Happy Thanksgiving (Stop Motion)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CndP1fYC0M

(Day 2 & 3)
Pencils
Tempera Paint (red, yellow, blue, white, black, brown)
Paintbrushes
Water (Rinse Cups)
Scissors
Glue
White Paper (Large)
Found Objects (Figures, Props, Created)
Molding Clay
Camera(s) (If two groups, two cameras)
Table(s) & Wall
Tape

(Day 4)
Camera(s)
Images Taken from Day 2 & 3
Computers
PowerPoint (Computer Program)

Day 1:
Introduction:
Time: 3 - 5 minutes
Welcome the students to the classroom. Have the students sit at their seats with their computers off or on standby (avoid having them move around, surf the internet, or check their email). Gather the students’ attention and begin the lesson.

Body:
Time: 3 - 5 minutes
Ask the students to give us (the student teachers) a helpful reminder about some of the lessons and experiences they have had with animation and even with stop motion. Explain to the students that stop motion is an animation process where a physically manipulated object appears to move on its own. The technique is worked ‘frame by frame’, individually photographing the small movements necessary to create a smooth animation. Next, have the students learn about storyboards and how they are useful in organizing thoughts and ideas before jumping straight into a project.

Learning Activity:
Time: 15 minutes
Show the students a few examples of stop motion films such as Blu, The Nightmare Before Christmas, and Gumby. Afterward have the class discuss what film or films they liked the best and why. What made one film more interesting or unique than another? Explain to the students that in the next few class periods they will be creating their very own short film using stop motion. Also explain that they will be split up into two groups both creating the backgrounds, environments, characters, and props used in their own films. Tell the students that their films must be based on one of the following: dreams, role models (personal inspirations), or nature. Each film must be at least 120 images and school appropriate at all times (no bullying, violence, crudeness, etc.). Organize the students into two groups and have the students come up with and sketch out a storyboard.

Work Time:
Time: 15 – 20 minutes
Go around the room observing the students’ work, help them, and answer any questions they may have about the storyboard process, themes, or project as a whole. First, have the students come up with their theme of choice. Ask them questions about it, get them to think about what they want to do and help them organize it. Keep them on task, support their ideas, and build upon them. Check to see that they understand the process of a storyboard and how/what they are going to use/bring for the filming.

Conclusion:
Time: 5 minutes
Have the students return to their seats, make sure that their area is clean, and gather their things up before the bell rings.

Day 2:
Introduction:
Time: 3 - 5 minutes
Welcome the students to the classroom. Have the students sit at their seats with their computers off or on standby (avoid having them move around, surf the internet, or check their email). Gather the students’ attention and begin the lesson.

Body:
Time: 5 - 10 minutes
Ask the students a little bit what they had talked about the last time and what they were making. Review about the storyboard process and about stop motion animation. Ask them if they had any problems last period and tell them what they will be doing today.

Learning Activity:
Time: 10 - 15 minutes
Explain to the students that they will be creating their backgrounds, characters and props today. If time allows they will also be able to begin using the cameras to capture shots of their stories. To add color to their backgrounds they will be using large sheets of paper and adding tempera paint. Some characters and props can be cut out of paper, while others can be from molding clay, or items brought from home. Discuss with them about how to add detail to their pieces; also, remind them about proper cutting and gluing instructions. Again, ask if there are any questions before they begin.

Work Time:
Time: 20 - 25 minutes
Have the students continue working on their short stop motion films. Go around the room observing the students’ work, help them, and answer any questions they may have about their artwork.

Conclusion:
Time: 10 minutes
Have the students return to their seats, make sure that their area is clean, and gather their things up before the bell rings.

Day 3:
Introduction:
Time: 3 - 5 minutes
Welcome the students to the classroom. Have the students sit at their seats with their computers off or on standby (avoid having them move around, surf the internet, or check their email). Gather the students’ attention and begin the lesson.

Body:
Time: 3 - 5 minutes
Ask the students a little bit what they had talked about the last time and what they were making. Review about the storyboard process and about stop motion animation. Ask them if they had any problems last period and tell them what they will be doing today.

Learning Activity:
Time: 5 - 10 minutes
Explain to the students that they will be capturing their stop motion stories with cameras today. Remind the students that they are to be using their storyboards as their guides. Again, ask if there are any questions before they begin.

Work Time:
Time: 20 - 25 minutes
Have the students continue working on their short stop motion films. Go around the room observing the students’ work, help them, and answer any questions they may have about their artwork.

Conclusion:
Time: 10 minutes
Have the students return to their seats, make sure that their area is clean, and gather their things up before the bell rings.


Day 4:
Introduction:
Time: 3 - 5 minutes
Welcome the students to the classroom. Have the students sit at their seats with their computers off or on standby (avoid having them move around, surf the internet, or check their email). Gather the students’ attention and begin the lesson.

Body:
Time: 5 - 10 minutes
Ask the students a little bit what they had talked about the last time and what they were making. Review about the storyboard process and about stop motion animation. Ask them if they had any problems last period and tell them what they will be doing today.

Learning Activity:
Time: 10 - 15 minutes
Explain to the students that today they will be taking their captured images off of their cameras and using PowerPoint to create a short film of their stories. Show the students how you can use PowerPoint by inserting images into it and add new slides. Ask if there are any questions then have the students begin working.

Work Time:
Time: 20 - 25 minutes
Have the students begin to experiment with PowerPoint adding their images to it and playing with the final product. If time allows, have both groups show their work to the other and have a critique. Go around the room observing the students’ work, help them, and answer any questions they may have about their artwork.

Conclusion:
Time: 10 minutes
Have the students return to their seats, make sure that their area is clean, and gather their things up before the bell rings.


September 18, 2008

Digital Collage Brainstorm

I really enjoyed creating creatures from our photographs, perhaps I would create a lesson plan based on this original idea. Creatures built from various textures, faces, and animals inside a scene developed about the same way. Also quilt patterns and building on geometric shapes could be done (possible interdisciplinary lesson with the math classroom). More advanced students (high school) could recreate famous works of art by collaging images together and manipulating the images in order to strengthen their piece.