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October 22, 2007

(S2.E4.) Chapter 20: The High Tide of Imperialism

19th Century Imperialism. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link. Download file

The High Tide of Imperialism. In the second half of the nineteenth century a new wave of imperialism engulfed the world. European industrialized nations and the United States embarked on a swift campaign to gobble up world markets and resources. Asia and Africa were divided as spoils among the major economic players. A true world economy began to emerge as traditional economic patterns were swept aside. While the colonizers asserted that they sought to spread democracy and capitalism, those they colonized were treated as second class citizens in their own nations. Moreover, traditional cultures succumbed to the pressures and forced changes of the colonizers. The benefits of imperialism derived exclusively to the colonizers.

Check these sites out if you want to learn more about the topics
To visit the Anglo-Boer museum and learn about the Boer War, visit http://www.anglo-boer.co.za/
To read the works of Rudyard Kipling and to learn about his life & literature, visit http://www.kipling.org.uk/
To learn more about imperialism, visit http://www.jlhs.nhusd.k12.ca.us/Classes/Social_Science/Imperialism/Imperialism.html

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E3.) Chapter 18: The Beginnings of Modernization: Industrialization and Nationalism, 1800-1870

The Industrial Revolution. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. Click on the link in the right hand column to subscribe to the series through iTunes. You can listen to this individual episode by clicking on the following web link. Download file

The Beginnings of Modernization: Industrialization and Nationalism, 1800-1870. After the French Revolution had released the forces of change, they were hard to control in Europe and the rest of the world. In 1848 a series of revolutions swept across Europe, and while most of them failed, ultimately their goals would be achieved. Both Italy and Germany were forged into unified nations, and many western nations developed parliamentary systems with more representation. Nationalism spurred fierce rivalries that when combined with technological and military developments set the stage for potentially devastating conflicts. A second revolution also spread across Europe – the Industrial Revolution. The developments in technology and machinery would transform the lives of all parts of society. Some would achieve great material prosperity, while others would be subjected to de-humanizing working and living conditions.

Check these sites out if you want to learn more about the topics
To read more on the life of Simón Bolivar, visit http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Acropolis/7609/eng/
For more information on James Watt, visit http://level2.phys.strath.ac.uk/ScienceOnStreets/jameswatt.html
To view an overview of the Romantic period and the artists of the time, visit http://encarta.msn.com/encnet/refpages/RefArticle.aspx?refid=761573163

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E2.) Chapter 17: The West on the Eve of a New World Order

Conflict and Progress in 18th Century Europe. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now, World History Since 1500. This episode can be automatically downloaded to your computer by subscribing through the iTunes web site. Click on the button on the right hand side to subscribe to the series. You can immediately listen to the podcast by clicking on the following web link. Download file

The West on the Eve of a New World Order. The 18th century stands as the turning point in world history, as the power of the old order diminished and revolution ushered in a new age. The century began with power in the hands of nobles, monarchs and clerics. Large-scale war demanded increasingly large armies with the subsequent need for higher taxes to fund them. In addition, growing populations and fundamental changes in economics began to reduce the power and importance of the old order. New world wars allowed Great Britain to create a world wide empire backed by the greatest navy. Increasing economic pressures helped to spawn a revolutionary movement that surged to the surface in the Western Hemisphere and in France. The movement demanded political liberty and equality –key concepts of the Enlightenment. While limited in reality, opportunities for most people were increased, and government became more responsive to the desires of its citizens.

Check these sites out if you want to learn more about the topics
To learn more about Napoleon Bonaparte from the French perspective, visit http://www.napoleon.org/en/home.asp
To read about Voltaire, visit http://www.lucidcafe.com/library/95nov/voltaire.html
To learn more about Quesnay, visit http://www.cooperativeindividualism.org/quesnaybio.html

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E1.) Season Two Introduction (Fall 2007)

Season Two Podcast Introduction. Welcome to the second season of Then and Now. The episode will be automatically downloaded to your computer if you already have subscribed to the Then and Now podcast. To immediately download the file, click on the following web link, Download file

This podcast is a cocreation by the students enrolled in PsTL 1251, World History Since 1500, at the University of Minnesota. Others involved in the podcast include me as the course instructor, Erik Tollsrud as the chief engineer, and Kari-Ann Ediger as the announcer. Each episode will feature contributions from the students that relate to our course. Most podcast episodes will center around one of the textbook chapters that we are exploring that week in the class. Other special podcast episodes may feature music from different countries and others will present interviews with experts in history topics living within our community.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team