« October 2007 | Main | December 2007 »

November 25, 2007

(S2.E7.) Chapter 24: World War II

World War Two. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

World War Two. The peace that had ended World War I left both Germany and Japan dissatisfied; they resented the favorable economic position gained by their rivals, primarily Britain, France and the United States. Germany and Japan were willing to risk another war to improve their economic fortunes and gain power. Democratic governments in both nations soon succumbed to the more powerful militant forces. In Europe Hitler unleashed the force of a revitalized Germany against her neighbors – determined to gain living space, resources and markets that would cement Germany's position as the dominant European, if not world, power. In Asia, Japan attempted to take advantage of internal Chinese turmoil to seize mastery of the Far East. Japanese aggression also brought her into conflict with the United States. World War II is the most destructive war in human history, both in terms of human loss and property destruction. A new level of political and military ruthlessness and cruelty had been born; over fifty million people worldwide lost their lives and many nations lay in rubble. The consequences of the conflict changed the world. The old European balance of power had been eliminated; instead two superpowers had been born from the conflict. The superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union, soon were at odds over the future of the postwar world, and they entered into a Cold War. While Europe, as well as Japan would recover, European hegemony in the world had been eliminated.

Check these sites out if you want to learn more about the topics
To learn more about the invasion of Normandy, visit http://search.eb.com/normandy/
For more on the Marshall Plan and the aftermath of World War II, visit http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/marshall/To visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on line, visit http://www.ushmm.org/

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

November 18, 2007

(S2.E6.) Chapter 23: Nationalism, revolution, & dictatorships in Africa, Asia, Latin America between 1919-1934

The World Between World War One and Two. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

Nationalism, revolution, & dictatorships in Africa, Asia, Latin America Between 1919-1934. With the destruction of World War I, European hegemony over the world weakened. This weakening sparked social and political disruptions around the world and fed growing nationalism. China stumbled towards the creation of a modern nation-state, but was divided between two views – Nationalists and Communists. While the Nationalists gained the upper hand prior to World War II, the two groups had to work together to fight their common enemies, and the worldwide depression nixed efforts to create an industrialized economy. In Latin America economic weakness and the dependence of many nations upon foreign investments, particularly from the United States, fed growing militant nationalism. Authoritarian governments rose to the power in several nations in an effort to force economic reform. The dismantling of the old Ottoman Empire changed the map of the Middle East as well. A smaller, secularized Turkey was born, as well as the states of Saudi Arabia and Palestine. Throughout Africa and Asia, nationalist movements gained momentum. In India, Gandhi's nonviolent protests helped weaken British control. In other areas of Asia communist-led movements attempted more radical means of throwing off the colonial yoke. In Japan, the path to modernization and acceptance as a world power continued although with increasingly militant tones.

Check these sites out if you want to learn more about the topics
To learn more about Mohandas Gandhi, visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahatma_Gandhi
To learn more about Palestine, visit http://www.palestine-net.com/
To view the work of Diego Rivera, visit http://www.diegorivera.com/

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E5.) Chapter 22: World War I and the Communist Revolution

World War One and the Communist Revolution. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link.Download file

The Beginning of the 20th Century Crisis: War & Revolution. The Age of Progress, as the period from 1870-1914 had been called, lulled the people of Europe into believing that mankind had evolved to the brink of ultimate happiness, security, wealth and peace. Within this period had also developed, however, rising militant nationalism, secret alliances, and a massive arms race. The slaughter and destruction of the First World War shattered the illusions of Europeans and the world. This was the first total war, which engulfed the resources and populations of entire nations, and the war ushered in the idea of strong central governments that restricted civil liberties in the name of national security. The doubts and uncertainties revealed by the war also gave rise to revolutionary changes in Russia and the Middle East. The peace that followed proved a failure and served more as a temporary lull in the fighting. Economic catastrophe led to the rise of totalitarian governments and then a second world war. In addition, Europe lost its power to control world affairs; colonial peoples no longer looked to Europe to provide leadership.

Check these sites out if you want to learn more about the topics
For a guided tour through the art of World War I, visit http://www.art-ww1.com/gb/visite.html
For more information on the League of Nations, visit http://history.acusd.edu/gen/ww2timeline/1919league2.html
To listen to music and speeches of the First World War, visit http://www.authentichistory.com/audio/ww1/ww1speeches01.html

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team