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January 27, 2008

(S3.E1.) Season Three Overview

Season Three Overview. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast previews the third season for the podcast series that will occurr during Spring 2008. The podcast series will continue many of the features of the first two seasons: (a) review of the lectures and textbook assignments for the course, (b) special interviews with community people who have some tie with topics discussed in the class, © special podcast episodes devoted to music from a particular country that helps to illustrate their culture; and (d) small group panel discussions of students who share some research about a history topic that they share a common interest with others in the class.

For listeners who want to learn more about podcasting in general and with education in particular, go the following web site http://podcasting.arendale.org There are several narrated PowerPoint presentations on the topic as well as links to other resources.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S3.E1.) Season Three Overview

Season Three Overview. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast previews the third season for the podcast series that will occurr during Spring 2008. The podcast series will continue many of the features of the first two seasons: (a) review of the lectures and textbook assignments for the course, (b) special interviews with community people who have some tie with topics discussed in the class, © special podcast episodes devoted to music from a particular country that helps to illustrate their culture; and (d) small group panel discussions of students who share some research about a history topic that they share a common interest with others in the class.

For listeners who want to learn more about podcasting in general and with education in particular, go the following web site http://podcasting.arendale.org There are several narrated PowerPoint presentations on the topic as well as links to other resources.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

January 22, 2008

(S2.E21.) Season Two Summary

Season Two Summary. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast reviews the second season for the podcast series that occurred during Fall 2007. The course instructor provides commdnts to the students who helped to create the weekly podcast as well as offers suggestions to other educators who might be interested in developing their own podcast to accompany their course. More information about podcasting in general and with education in particular is available at http://podcasting.arendale.org There are several narrated PowerPoint presentations on the topic as well as links to other resources.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

January 21, 2008

(S2.E20.) Panel: Impact of Technology on U.S. Culture

Panel Discussion of the Impact of Technology on U.S. Culture. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link
Download file

The podcast explores the impact of technology on U.S. culture in the past century. The topics explored in the panel discussion included: cell phones, Nintendo and video games, aviation, and use of robotics during medical surgeries. Some of the discussions explored not only the immediate impact of the individual technology, but also the long-range impact on U.S. society as a whole. Some of these impacts were not anticipated by the creators of the technology and those who quickly adopted it.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E19.) Panel: Impact of Sports on U.S. Culture

Panel Discussion of the Impact of Sports on U.S. Culture. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of sports on U.S. culture in the past century. The topics explored in the panel discussion included: two involving boxing (Jack Johnson and the Ali vs. Foreman match), the U.S. Hockey team's "Miracle on Ice" and the influence of Michael Jordan. The discussion not only investigagted the influence by individual athletes, but also the cultural forces that also made them important.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E18.) Panel: Significant Events During War in the 20th Century

Panel Discussion of Significant Events During War in the 20th Century. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link
Download file

The podcast explores the impact of individual events that occurred during a war on the eventual outcome and also on public reaction in the United States. The topics explored in the panel discussion included: the D-Day Invasion during World War Two and three panelists investigated the Mai Lai Massacre during the Vietnma War..

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E17.) Panel: Impact of Race Relations on U.S. Culture

Panel Discussion of Race Relations on U.S. Culture. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of race relations on U.S. culture in the past century. The topics explored in the panel discussion included: Million Man March on Washington D.C., Duluth lynchings, and the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War Two..

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

January 17, 2008

(S2.E16.) Panel: International Issues of 60s & 70s

Panel Discussion of International Events of the 1960s and 1970s. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of international events from the 1960s and the 1970s and their influence on U.S. society today. The topics explored in the panel discussion included: Cuban Missile Crisis, Hmong involvement in the Vietnam War, and Hmong immigration to the U.S. after the Vietnam War.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

January 16, 2008

(S2.E15.) Panel: Economic Impact on Culture

Panel Discussion on the Impact of Economics on U.S. Culture. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of economic events or processes on change in the U.S. The four topics explored in the panel discussion included: Exxon Valdez oil spill, creation of indoor shopping malls, introduction of E-commerce practices, and the Klondike Gold Rush. While the initial impact of each of these events was considerable in the local area in which it occurred, the long term impact was far greater in U.S. society as a whole. Often these economic activities had an indirect and profound impact on other aspects of social life.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Teamtrong>Panel Discussion on the Impact

January 15, 2008

(S2.E14.) Panel: Policy Impact on Social Change

Panel Discussion on the Impact of Policies on Social Change in the U.S. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of policies on social change in the U.S. These policies may have come from private agencies or from the government. Sometimes these policy decisions led to big changes within U.S. society. This panel discussion explores the Orphan Trains of the late 1800s, birth control, and Huricane Katrina. Issues of gender, race, and class also cut across each of these topics and helped to make connections among them and with deeper connections to change within U.S. society.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Teamtrong>Panel Discussion on the Impact

January 14, 2008

(S2.E13.) Panel: Music Impact on U.S. Culture

Panel Discussion on the Impact of Music on U.S. Culture.. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of music on U.S. culture. The students shared about hip hop music, Elivis Presley, and the Beatles. Each of the music artists not only influenced U.S. culture, but they themselves were heavily influenced by the culture in which they grew up. In addition, several of the music artists also influenced one another as well.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Teamtrong>Panel Discussion on the Impact

January 13, 2008

(S2.E12.) Special: Reggae Music

Reggae Music. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

“Reggae is a music genre first developed in Jamaica in the late 1960s. While sometimes used in a broader sense to refer to most types of Jamaican music, the term reggae more properly denotes a particular music style that originated following on the development of ska and rocksteady. Reggae is based on a rhythm style characterized by regular chops on the off-beat, known as the skank. The tempo is generally slower than that found in ska. Reggae usually has accents on the 3rd beat in each bar, there being four beats in a bar; most people think it's accentuated on the 2nd and 4th because of the rhythm guitar. Reggae is often associated with the Rastafari movement, an influence on many prominent reggae musicians from its inception. Reggae song lyrics deal with many subjects, including faith, love, relationships, poverty, injustice and other broad social issues. (Taken from the first paragraph describing this genre from the first paragraph of the main article on this music from Wikipedia.)

This special podcast provides an some insight into another region of the world by listening to some popular music that is commonly played over the radio. Music often reflects the culture of another country. This episode focuses on Reggae music. While originally considered music from the Caribbean, it has spread around the world. One of the artists featured is from South Africa. Check out the Wikipedia entry on Reggae music as a starting pointing. Links are provided for more information on each of the music artists on this podcast below.

The five music groups featured are:
1. Ziggy Marley, “Into the groove" http://www.ziggymarley.com/
2. Ras Sheehama, “Pure love" http://www.rassheehama.com/
3. Zion Eye, “One love" http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendid=14915718
4. Majek Fashek, “I am not afraid" http://www.majekfashek.com
5. Soul fege, “To be free" http://www.soulfege.com

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E11.) Special: Music from Sweden

Special: Music from Sweden. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

This special podcast provides an some insight into another country by listening to some popular music that is commonly played over the radio. Music often reflects the culture of another country. This episode focuses on Sweden. Just as in the U.S., there is great diversity of its musical traditions, some of which date back more than 1,000 years. The student responsible for this podcast selected pop music from Sweden.

The three music groups featured are:
1. Firefox AK, "City to city"
2. Kahsay, "Shake your head"
3. AssertiveSound, "Starpilot"

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

January 12, 2008

(S2.E10.) Special: Interview with Islamic Imam

Special: Interview with Islamic Imam. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

This special podcast provides an interview with Hassan Mohamud who is an Imam with a local Islamic mosque. Mr. Mohamud is also an Asjuct Professor of Law with William Mitchell College of Law. The short interview provides some helpful insights from him regarding the Islamic faith and its relationship with U.S. culture. He mentions two web sites that are useful for people who want to learn more about the Islamic fairth: (a) Islam Online, http://islamonline.net and (b) Islamic Finder, http://islamicfinder.net

The music for the podcast comes from the Monterey International Pop Festival, a famous music concert following Woodstock. The featured tracks are "Shake" by Otis Redding and "For what it's worth" by Buffalo Springfield. Both of these artists were major music forces during the 1960s and the songs were classics both then and even now.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

January 9, 2008

(S2.E9.) Special: Interview of World War Two Observer

Memoires of World War Two from an Observer From Then. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link
Download file

This special podcast provides an interview with Emily White who traveled through Europe and the U.S. during World War Two. Her father was a diplomat whose work took him to Austria, England, and the U.S. Her account of events during that time and her comments about present day events makes this an important interview to hear.

The music for the podcast comes from Skyla Spencer. Check out her web site at http://www.skylaspencer.com. She also has several music videos at the site as well, http://www.skylaspencer.com/music_videos.htm

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team