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October 3, 2012

(S11.E1.) Season 11 Podcast Overview

Welcome to another season of "Then and Now: Global History of the Past 100 Years." Each episode explores our recent world history through review of class session topics, exam prep activities, and special podcasts devoted to interviews and music specials.

Click on the following link to download the episode and listen on your computer. Or you can subscribe to the podcast through iTunes and have it automatically downloaded to your computer. (S11.E1.) Season 11 Podcast Overview.m4a

February 17, 2011

(S9.E1.) Season Nine Welcome

Welcome to Season Nine of Then and Now Podcast.

Thanks for joining us for season nine of the audio podcast series focused on contemporary global history and culture.

You can download and listen to this podcast episode by licking the following link to download this episode. It will begin playing on the default media player on your computer. (S9.E1) Season Nine Welcome.m4a

Please provide feedback about the podcast episode. You can do so by:
\1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

October 9, 2010

(S8.E1.) Season Eight Fall 2010 Overview

Season Eight Overview

Welcome to another season of Then and Now: Global History of the Past 100 Years. Each episode explores an important topic that help make sense out of the world today.

You can download and listen to this podcast episode by licking the following link to download this episode. It will begin playing on the default media player on your computer. (S8.E1.) Season Eight Overview.m4a

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

February 14, 2010

(S7.E1.) Season Seven Introduction

Season Seven Introduction

Welcome to another season of "Then and Now: Global History and Culture of the Past 100 Years." This is the seventh season for the podcast with more student-created content that before. A dozen of the students have volunteered to create special podcasts that focus on music from different countries and how the culture and history of the nation are exprerssed through it. Other students in this group are conducting interviews with local community and family members to share first-hand knowledge of historical events.

You can download and listen to this podcast episode by licking the following link to download this episode. It will begin playing on the default media player on your computer. (S7.E1.) Season 7 Introduction.m4a

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

November 1, 2009

(S6.E1.) Season Six Openner

Greetings,

Welcome to another season of "Then and Now: World History of the Past 100 Years." This is our sixth season for the students in my introductory world history class to create a weekly podcast along with me. Each episode focuses on a topic in world history. Often the episodes examine topics in the textbook chapters and help prepare for major exams. Other episodes present interviews with community persons with expertise in a history topic, music specials that focus on music from a particular country and how it helps to reflect their history and culture, and rebroadcast of history episodes created by other podcasters.

To listen to the series, go to Apple's iTunes store (http://itunes.com) and subscribe to this series. Search for "Arendale" and it should appear in the search window. Click on the "subscribe" button, then click again on a similar button, and the each new episode will download to your computer. In case you do not have the iTunes software installed on your computer, a free download is also available at the Apple web site. Or, you can download and listen to individual episodes by visiting this blog page. Click on the following link to download this episode. It will begin playing on the default media player on your computer. If it plays through the iTunes player, it will download into the music library. (S6.E1.) Season Six Overview.m4a

The theme music for the podcast is provided by Derek K. Miller. he has graciously granted permission to use his music during the introduction to each episode. The song is titled "Cold cloth and an ice pack." He provides other music that can be downloaded through his web site. Check it out at the following link http://www.penmachine.com/musicpages/demos.html

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

October 7, 2008

(S4.E6.) Chpt 6: World War Two

Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History During the Past Century. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link, Download file

This podcast episode focuses on Chapter Six, World War Two. So much of the 20th century is defined by the events and the results of this world war. One way to examine the war is to investigate the potential turning points that could have led to Allied or Axis victory.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-350-2421

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

October 5, 2008

(S4.E1.) Season Four Introduction

Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History During the Past Century. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link, Download file

This podcast episode focuses on an overview of the upcoming season.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-350-2421

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

January 27, 2008

(S3.E1.) Season Three Overview

Season Three Overview. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast previews the third season for the podcast series that will occurr during Spring 2008. The podcast series will continue many of the features of the first two seasons: (a) review of the lectures and textbook assignments for the course, (b) special interviews with community people who have some tie with topics discussed in the class, © special podcast episodes devoted to music from a particular country that helps to illustrate their culture; and (d) small group panel discussions of students who share some research about a history topic that they share a common interest with others in the class.

For listeners who want to learn more about podcasting in general and with education in particular, go the following web site http://podcasting.arendale.org There are several narrated PowerPoint presentations on the topic as well as links to other resources.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S3.E1.) Season Three Overview

Season Three Overview. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast previews the third season for the podcast series that will occurr during Spring 2008. The podcast series will continue many of the features of the first two seasons: (a) review of the lectures and textbook assignments for the course, (b) special interviews with community people who have some tie with topics discussed in the class, © special podcast episodes devoted to music from a particular country that helps to illustrate their culture; and (d) small group panel discussions of students who share some research about a history topic that they share a common interest with others in the class.

For listeners who want to learn more about podcasting in general and with education in particular, go the following web site http://podcasting.arendale.org There are several narrated PowerPoint presentations on the topic as well as links to other resources.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

January 22, 2008

(S2.E21.) Season Two Summary

Season Two Summary. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast reviews the second season for the podcast series that occurred during Fall 2007. The course instructor provides commdnts to the students who helped to create the weekly podcast as well as offers suggestions to other educators who might be interested in developing their own podcast to accompany their course. More information about podcasting in general and with education in particular is available at http://podcasting.arendale.org There are several narrated PowerPoint presentations on the topic as well as links to other resources.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

October 22, 2007

(S2.E1.) Season Two Introduction (Fall 2007)

Season Two Podcast Introduction. Welcome to the second season of Then and Now. The episode will be automatically downloaded to your computer if you already have subscribed to the Then and Now podcast. To immediately download the file, click on the following web link, Download file

This podcast is a cocreation by the students enrolled in PsTL 1251, World History Since 1500, at the University of Minnesota. Others involved in the podcast include me as the course instructor, Erik Tollsrud as the chief engineer, and Kari-Ann Ediger as the announcer. Each episode will feature contributions from the students that relate to our course. Most podcast episodes will center around one of the textbook chapters that we are exploring that week in the class. Other special podcast episodes may feature music from different countries and others will present interviews with experts in history topics living within our community.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

February 24, 2007

(S1.E14.) Season One Summary

Season One Podcast Summary. Thanks for listening to the first season of Then and Now.The episode will be automatically downloaded to your computer if you already have subscribed to the Then and Now podcast. To immediately download the file, click on the following web link, Download file

It has been an adventure producing the podcast through the efforts of the students in the class and the teaching assistants who I have the opportunity to work with. On this podcast I identify some of the lessons that I have learned through the production of the podcast. Brian shares some final study strategies to consider for this and other classes. We also preview the second season for the podcast which will feature commentary by Brian and myslef making links between today's headlines and historical events that influence them. One other note. The theme music for the podcast has been kindly provided by Derek K. Miller who provides music for use by podcasters. The name of the sone is "Cold Cloth" and is played in its entirety at the end fo the podcast. I encourage you to visit his website, http://www.penmachine.com

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

December 16, 2006

(S1.E12.) Chapter 29: Toward the Pacific Century?

Southeast Asia Today. Greetings. We have reached the final chapter in the textbook, 'Toward the Pacific Century?" The file can be downloaded by clicking on the following link. Download file The file will be automatically downloaded to your computer if you have already subscribed to the Then and Now podcast.

Toward the Pacific Century?</strong> This final chapter in the textbook examines South Asia (e.g., India) and Southeast Asia (e.g., China, Japan, and many other nations). The central question that the textbook leaves us with is which country or alliance of countries will be the dominant leader in the world in 2050 or even the year. The nations of South Asia and Southeast Asia have thrown off the vestiges of colonialism and have rapidly built industrialized economies. Democracy has been slower to evolve here. Industrialization has brought vast changes to the society and culture of the regions, but these nations have worked to incorporate traditional values and culture into a modern state. Vast wealth has been created but has not been diffused throughout society, thus creating great disparities within societies. Japan rapidly rebuilt after World War II and achieved its goal of becoming one of the world's economic superpowers. These economic achievements were made in part because Japan has almost no military expenses. The unprecedented growth in the economies of the Pacific rim led to a belief that the prosperity was permanent, however, recent persistent economic slowdowns have undermined optimism. In many Southeast Asian and East Asian nations a re-evaluation of benefits of industrialization is underway.

Check these sites out if you want to learn more about the topics
To visit the official website of ASEAN, visit http://www.us-asean.org/To learn more about Indonesia, visit http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/idtoc.html
To learn about the legal system in Hong Kong and the influence of East and West, visit http://www.info.gov.hk/justice/content02.htm
To learn about the small nation of Brunei, visit http://www.lonelyplanet.com/destinations/south_east_asia/brunei/

Ricardo has selected music from the podsafemusicnetwork. He selected several artists, Arcadian Reign laying Boom Boom, Delinquent Habits playing Play feat Michelle, and Intelect playing Low Beat. Click on the name of the group to visit their band's web site.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S1.E10.) Chapter 28: Africa and the Middle East Since World War Two

Africa and the Middle East Today. Greetings. Welcome to another episode of the podcast. This episode focuses on events impacting Africa and the Middle East since the end of World War II. To limmediately download the file, click on the following liknk Download file If you are already subscribed to the podcast through iTunes, it should automatically arrive soon.

Africa and the Middle East Since World War Two. Both Africa and the Middle East have emerged from the shadow of colonialism in the twentieth century with great potential for carving their own successful futures. Both regions have, however, been beset with problems that have prevented them from reaching their destinies. These problems are in part caused by the affects of colonialism. In Africa, arbitrary boundaries imposed from outside have exacerbated ethnic divisions and have led to violent struggles. Also, most African nations were ill-prepared for independence and have struggled with inexperience and limited economies. Lack of infrastructure, overpopulation, long term drought, famine and disease plague modern Africa. In the Middle East vast oil reserves promise prosperity to some but also bring unwanted outside influence. Most Middle Easterners struggle with their identities – nationalism versus Islam. Within Islam there is not agreement on the extent of religious involvement in politics and society, and many residents of the area still resent the imposition and dominance of Western culture during colonialism. Middle Easterners defied colonial rulers by remaining true to their faith, which became a symbol of their identity and pride. With the concern over the declining morals of contemporary society, fundamentalism has become a strong counter in many Middle Eastern societies – much like the rise of religion in Western culture. The region is also part of an ongoing struggle between Arabs and Israelis (another vestige of imperialism), and the failure to successfully settle the issue creates ongoing tensions that usually erupt in violence.

Check these sites out if you want to learn more about the topics
To learn about OPEC, visit http://www.opec.org/
To learn more about the United Nations and Human Rights, visit http://www.un.org/rights/index.html
To learn more about women's issues around the world, visit http://www.wic.org/To learn about the Organization of African Unity (OAU), visit http://www.itcilo.it/english/actrav/telearn/global/ilo/law/oau.htm

Following is information about the music played on this podcast that was selected by one of the students in the course. Nic selected the rock band Atomsplit which he discovered through the podsafemusicnetwork. The band has been featured on SM radio, MTV's reality shows, and other college radio stations. Click on the following link to visit their website, http://www.atomsplit.com

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

November 22, 2006

(S1.E6.) Chapter 24: World War Two

World War Two. Greetings. This week's episode is focused on World War II. You can download the episode and listen to it through the iTunes software by clicking on the following link. Download file As we discussed in class, chapter 24 is closely connected with World War I in chpater 22 and chpater 23 which looks at the connections between WWI and WWII

The crisis deepens: World War Two. The peace that had ended World War I left both Germany and Japan dissatisfied; they resented the favorable economic position gained by their rivals, primarily Britain, France and the United States. Germany and Japan were willing to risk another war to improve their economic fortunes and gain power. Democratic governments in both nations soon succumbed to the more powerful militant forces. In Europe Hitler unleashed the force of a revitalized Germany against her neighbors – determined to gain living space, resources and markets that would cement Germany's position as the dominant European, if not world, power. In Asia, Japan attempted to take advantage of internal Chinese turmoil to seize mastery of the Far East. Japanese aggression also brought her into conflict with the United States. World War II is the most destructive war in human history, both in terms of human loss and property destruction. A new level of political and military ruthlessness and cruelty had been born; over fifty million people worldwide lost their lives and many nations lay in rubble. The consequences of the conflict changed the world. The old European balance of power had been eliminated; instead two superpowers had been born from the conflict. The superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union, soon were at odds over the future of the postwar world, and they entered into a Cold War. While Europe, as well as Japan would recover, European hegemony in the world had been eliminated.

Check these sites out if you want to learn more about the topics
To learn more about the invasion of Normandy, visit http://search.eb.com/normandy/For more on the Marshall Plan and the aftermath of World War II, visit http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/marshall/To visit the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum on line, visit http://www.ushmm.org/
Erik our tech TA has added a nice feature to the podcast. It is now divided into "chapters" which you can choose either through the "chapters" drop down menu at the top of the screen within the iTunes software player or the controls on your iPod. You can easily skip ahead or quickly return back to an early section of the podcast. Listen carefully to his tech tip in this episode to discover how to do this. I believe that this feature is only available if you have downloaded version 7 of the free iTunes software.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

November 8, 2006

(S1.E1.) Then and Now Podcast Overview

Podcast Introduction. Welcome to the first episode in the podcast series. Our weekly pocast focuses on understanding material in an introduction to world history course. Each podcast will feature voices of the course instructor, teaching assistant, technology assistant, and students enrolled in the class. Each episode will feature review of textbook chapters, commentary by students, and music selections by the students. Some episodes will feature one or two songs from an intedpendent music artist. Some episodes will be completely devoted to independent music from a particular country that we are studying in the class. Please join us as we explore world history since 1500.

You can obtain a free subscription to the podcast by subscribing to it through the iTunes service. In the search engine window, type "Then and Now" and then press the "subscribe" botton. That's it. Each show will automiatically be downloaded to your iTunes player on the computer. You can also click on the following link to listen to it through your computer media player, Download file The theme music at the beginning and close of each episode is provided by Derek K. Miller. The selection is "Cold Cloth" and was obtained from his website, http://www.penmachine.com

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

May 17, 2006

Welcome to PSTL1251, World History Since 1500

WWelcome to Blog Page. Glad you are checking out the blog page for my course, World History Since 1500. I enjoy teaching this class since it changes every time that it is offered. The two basic references for the class is the textbook and today's newspaper. That is why I used the phrase "then and now" in the title of this blog page. While we may talk about events hundreds of years ago in other countries, we will work hard to connect them to you. We travel fast in this class since we will spin around the world over the past 500 years. We will focus on the big picture and the major forces at work that shaped history.

This course examines the ideas that influenced the development of global, political, social, and economic systems during the past five centuries. This course explores civilizations of the world, by placing historical events, customs and cultures in a global context. The first two-thirds of the course address the period from 1500 C.E. to 1945 C.E. while the last third focuses on the period since World War II. The course informs students about non-western societies prior to the impact of European expansion and traces the effects of European contact on those societies over time. The course develops major concepts such as nationalism, colonialism, liberalism, socialism, communism, and fascism while tracing their impact on Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The last five weeks of the course focus on the period from World War II to the present. This emphasis provides most of the relevant historical background to current ethnic conflicts, the breakup of the Soviet Union, the modernization of Japan, China, and India, Arab/Israeli disputes, nation building in Africa, neo-colonialism and trade dependence in developing countries.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-333-1261

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team