Main

January 21, 2008

(S2.E20.) Panel: Impact of Technology on U.S. Culture

Panel Discussion of the Impact of Technology on U.S. Culture. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link
Download file

The podcast explores the impact of technology on U.S. culture in the past century. The topics explored in the panel discussion included: cell phones, Nintendo and video games, aviation, and use of robotics during medical surgeries. Some of the discussions explored not only the immediate impact of the individual technology, but also the long-range impact on U.S. society as a whole. Some of these impacts were not anticipated by the creators of the technology and those who quickly adopted it.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E19.) Panel: Impact of Sports on U.S. Culture

Panel Discussion of the Impact of Sports on U.S. Culture. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of sports on U.S. culture in the past century. The topics explored in the panel discussion included: two involving boxing (Jack Johnson and the Ali vs. Foreman match), the U.S. Hockey team's "Miracle on Ice" and the influence of Michael Jordan. The discussion not only investigagted the influence by individual athletes, but also the cultural forces that also made them important.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E18.) Panel: Significant Events During War in the 20th Century

Panel Discussion of Significant Events During War in the 20th Century. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link
Download file

The podcast explores the impact of individual events that occurred during a war on the eventual outcome and also on public reaction in the United States. The topics explored in the panel discussion included: the D-Day Invasion during World War Two and three panelists investigated the Mai Lai Massacre during the Vietnma War..

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

(S2.E17.) Panel: Impact of Race Relations on U.S. Culture

Panel Discussion of Race Relations on U.S. Culture. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of race relations on U.S. culture in the past century. The topics explored in the panel discussion included: Million Man March on Washington D.C., Duluth lynchings, and the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War Two..

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

January 17, 2008

(S2.E16.) Panel: International Issues of 60s & 70s

Panel Discussion of International Events of the 1960s and 1970s. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of international events from the 1960s and the 1970s and their influence on U.S. society today. The topics explored in the panel discussion included: Cuban Missile Crisis, Hmong involvement in the Vietnam War, and Hmong immigration to the U.S. after the Vietnam War.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Team

January 15, 2008

(S2.E14.) Panel: Policy Impact on Social Change

Panel Discussion on the Impact of Policies on Social Change in the U.S. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of policies on social change in the U.S. These policies may have come from private agencies or from the government. Sometimes these policy decisions led to big changes within U.S. society. This panel discussion explores the Orphan Trains of the late 1800s, birth control, and Huricane Katrina. Issues of gender, race, and class also cut across each of these topics and helped to make connections among them and with deeper connections to change within U.S. society.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Teamtrong>Panel Discussion on the Impact

January 14, 2008

(S2.E13.) Panel: Music Impact on U.S. Culture

Panel Discussion on the Impact of Music on U.S. Culture.. Welcome to another episode of Then and Now: World History Since 1500. You can subscribe to the podcast series by clicking on the button in the right hand column. You can also listen to just this episode by clicking on the following web link Download file

The podcast explores the impact of music on U.S. culture. The students shared about hip hop music, Elivis Presley, and the Beatles. Each of the music artists not only influenced U.S. culture, but they themselves were heavily influenced by the culture in which they grew up. In addition, several of the music artists also influenced one another as well.

This podcast is based on a student panel discussion in one of the history courses this semester. Each of the students had completed a paper on a history topic of their choice for a writing course which was paired with this world history course. I grouped the students into small groups of three to five students on a similar topic. The goal was to share highlights from their papers and to develop connections among the papers and with the larger context of U.S. history in which they took place.

Please share feedback about the shows through any of the following methods:
1. post a comment to this blog page
2. send an email message to arendale@umn.edu
3. leave an audio comment on our listener feedback line at 206-888-4894

Take care,
David Arendale and the rest of the Then and Now Podcast Teamtrong>Panel Discussion on the Impact