December 8, 2008

Water as a human right!!!!

Globalization. As a Global Studies student the meaning of this word is a constant struggle. I have tried so desperately to clinch onto the idea that we are moving faster and faster closer to the close knit, fair trade, cultural exchanging, global community that might have a new future. However all I can see lately is this community that takes the voices from the few and implements laws that push the agenda of the few. It is not cultural exchange but rather cultural domination and hegemony. Fair trade is a myth that has to stay alive so that the weak don’t lose hope or worse rebel. The documentary that we watched this week “Life and Debt? has made me think about the countless human rights violations that are justified by Wallstreet and economist as market driven Economy. One of these violations I wanted to talk about in this blog is Water. I am sure you all heard about the leading concerns of the water industry. I mean we all know that we shouldn’t buy plastic bottles, or support bottle companies that kill of the sovereignty of weaker nations, however this issues goes so much deeper. Can you afford to live? This question seems absurd and unreasonable in our contemporary community. It is well established and affirmed by the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCR) that every human has a "right to life", this means that no human can be deprived of the elements that make life possible. What happens if the government or a corporation asks: "Can you afford to drink?" For 1.1 billion people in the world the answer to this question would be, "NO". The global society is constantly being challenged by war, diseases, and the collapse or instability of states. However in the 21st century, with the realization that water has become a finite resource, it is the lack of fresh water that concerns most nations. With the combination of pollution, population growth, and climate change the water cycle has been damaged and water scarcity has become an increasing threat to many nations. Water is essential to every aspect of human life; our health and welfare depend on it. What happens if it isn't made available to us. It is essential that water is seen as a human right rather than a commodity. With the help of privatization of water sources, water has changed from a human right into a human need. Thru the process of Globalization countries are made to believe that water is a good that is supposed to be provided by the most competitive company, rather than the local government.

The privatization of water, which allows companies such as Coca-Cola to extract large amounts of ground water for a minimal price, is leaving the Indian people without access to water. The communities surrounding the 52 Coca-Cola bottling plants are experiencing severe water shortages thought to be caused by the massive extraction of ground water by cola companies. The Central Ground Water Board (CGWB) of India has conducted studies that confirm a significant depletion of the water table in the areas surrounding the bottling plants. One example is Rajasthan, India, where the CGWB found water tables had dropped 10 meters within five years of Coca-Cola starting bottling operations in Kala Dera, Rajasthan (India Resource). In another study of water conditions in eight villages within a three kilometer radius of the Coca-Cola bottling plant in Mehdianj found the number of wells that had dried up increased seven-fold since Coca-Cola began operations in the area (India Resource). This severe depletion of the local ground water table is prompting further investigation into the overall environmental degradation of the area as a whole. Coca-Cola claims on their website that throughout all of their operations in India, stringent quality monitoring takes place covering both the source water they use as well as their finished product. All of the water used for beverage manufacturing conforms to drinking water standards, making it safe and ensuring that it meets the highest international standards, including BIS and EU standards for drinking water. They also test for traces of pesticide in groundwater to the level of parts per billion. This is equivalent to one drop in a billion drops. The water intensive production practices of Coca-Cola have raised concerns about the contamination of the remaining ground water and surrounding land. Coca-Cola discharges hazardous waste water into fields and rivers surrounding the bottling plants, resulting in ground water and soil pollution. In some areas of India, the water wells and pumps have been labeled with signs that state the water is unfit for human consumption. The Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) found excessive levels of lead and cadmium in all Coca-Cola waste and confirmed contamination of ground water and soil contamination in areas where this waste was disposed (India Resource). Prior to the CPCB study, this waste was distributed to Indian farmers as fertilizer for their crops (India Resource). As a result of the study, seven states in India have imposed partial bans on the sale of Coca- Cola products due to the high levels of pesticides in the waste products (India Resource). This
contamination of land and water supply coupled with a declining water table has caused severe interruption of agricultural practices in India, a country in which 70 percent of the population earns a living from agriculture and related practices, resulting in oppression of the people of India. In the face of the oppression resulting from water privatization, the Indian people are taking action in movements and protests that demand their basic needs to be considered before corporate profit. In this case the sovereignty of the local government has been pushed to their threshold by Coca Cola undermining the needs of the locals. One such movement in Kerala, India began with Indian women who were upset about having to travel greater distances because their wells were contaminated or dry from the activities of the bottling plant. While the IMF, WTO, and the World Bank define this as perfectly legal activity, Economist go as far as talking about creating a rich industry in developing countries through open market and free trade. After watching the “Live and Debt? movie Free trade has a new meaning to me. The rich and powerful a “FREE? to steal, exploit, and oppress the weak. Wait a sec that sounds like it happened before…yup Imperialism has a new name and face: Free Trade!

Gender Talk and Proposition 8


While reading Chapter 6, “Black, Lesbian, and Gay: Speaking the Unspeakable? in Gender Talk, my mind immediately went to the recent passage of Proposition 8 in California. This chapter discussed the negative attitudes toward homosexuals that exists in the African-American community. The recent passage of Proposition 8 is proof of these negative attitudes still existing in 2008. According to exit polls, 70% of all African-Americans that voted in the decision voted in favor of the measure. In addition, no other minority supported the measure by more than 53%, which was the percentage of Latinos that backed the proposition. In Gender Talk, Cole and Guy-Sheftall give many reasons why this negative attitude toward homosexuals developed in African-American communities. One reason for the homophobia was the acceptance of traditional notions of masculinity and femininity and the embrace of Christian values (which included antihomosexual beliefs). The authors go on to discuss how Black Nationalism was a large influence on homophobia in the African-American community. According to the authors, a persistent theme in post 50's Black Nationalism was that males became homosexual as the result of adopting decadent white values. Clearly then, this practice would be looked upon as a sickness by the black community. Another reason the authors mention for homophobia in the black community is the large placement of value on a patriarchical society. It seems as though African-American communities place a lot of merit on having a male dominated society, and in this type of society it is not ideal to be gay because that is seen as taking away a man’s masculinity and power. These are just a few reasons highlighted in chapter six of Gender Talk, and it seems that more people need to be paying attention to the homophobia that exists in African-American communities so that a well-needed change happens.

Rachael Wendlandt

December 10, 2008

What Now?

Seeming how the semester is quickly coming to an end and how this is my last blog post, I thought I might attempt a post that others could comment on a lot if the need for more comments is there. What now? In the last semester we have seen many things, heard lots of opinions, and read through a lot of information. However, where do we go from here? We talked a little bit in regards to the Project South Globalization toolkit about what we need to do. In order to create social change and an opportunity for social change we must not just ‘sit back and watch’ as others attempt to make progress on their own, but instead we must help out. Unlike many sports and events, social change is not a ‘spectator sport’, and it definitely cannot be successful as such. We must take action, we must participate, continuing to learn and share our opinions everywhere we can. This class has really helped me to see that without ‘standing up’ and using your voice, you can never be heard even if you have the best idea or the right answer. It is very disheartening to imagine the number of people in the last couple centuries that have gone unnoticed, unheard, just because they haven’t actively voiced their opinion. Many great ideas could have prevented wars, discrimination, or lack of opportunity for certain groups. I hope that everyone looks to participate and voice their opinions in the future, and I am just curious on how some of you plan to do that. I myself am only a freshman here at the University of Minnesota and am not aware of a lot of the opportunities available to me.

Any comments will be greatly appreciated. I also would like to thank all of you for being wonderful classmates. Discussions got a little heated at times, but I really valued all of your opinions throughout the semester. Thanks and have a great winter break!!!

Life and Debt in Jamaica:


I don’t know about anyone else, but I felt horribly spoiled while watching this film. It is amazing how the selfish acts of the United States and other world powers due in order to make a profit off of developing countries like Jamaica. In our class up until now we generally were talking about national issues of Race, Class and Gender. We thought situations were bad in our country...they are, but are not even comparable to the oppression we and the rest of the world hold on the poor of developing countries. In a way it reminded me of slavery, legal slavery. We are able to outsource work to other countries in order to produce products for close to no cost. The people in our country need to be more educated about what are products are made of and how much profit a company is making off of each product. Much like neutrition labels on food, we should have more statistical data on our clothing and product tags. It would be interesting to see how much a company actually makes off of each product. The tags would only need three different numbers: The total cost to produce the product, The total cost of labor to make the product, and The price the company sold the product to the stores for. This way we can also see how much profit the stores are making on the products. By including this information, hopefully it would bring attention to the issue of unfair job markets outside of our country, and companies may be likely to pay employees more inorder to decrease the total profit number on the tag. Consumers would feel less ripped off if they saw the numbers were closer together. Maybe with this increase in pay, the companies would realize that they don’t have to take the jobs to other countries, and could pay the people in the United States the same wages (Assuming they would be at or above minimum wage). I know this may sound pretty radical, but that is exactly what we need to fix the problems with outsourcing and taking advantage of less fortunate countries.


Adam Ninnemann

This Course...

From taking this course, I have gained a lot of insight into how society was, and is, constructed. As I mentioned in one of my earlier blogs, before this class I had never considered race, class, and gender as anything other than "the ways things are." After having read all the materials and watching the in-class videos, I have a totally different perspective on things. I view others differently; I no longer describe people's race when am telling others about my experiences. I have also reconstructed my views on class, gender and sexuality.
Now, I do like nice things and want a lot out of life, but I don't correlate that with class anymore. Class is, for the most part, a figment of our imagination. I actually laugh at people who think their "high" class. As far as gender goes, I still enjoy being the women of the houes which includes cooking, cleaning and caring for my son, but I have a much better understanding of where "womens' roles" came from. Don't get me wrong, I don't feel these are ONLY my roles, my man does these things too, I just do them more frequently (and I probably enjoy doing them more too.)
Because of this class, I analyze many of the people, norms, and policies I come across just about everyday. I find myself telling others about these social constructions and how they have impacted my life as well. Even though I thought this course and the material could have been presented in a more intriguing manner, I am glad I took this course. My favorite part was watching the videos; they really helped to put things to to perspective for me. "Life and Debt in Jamaica" helped me to see how globalization, trade policies, and power all intersect and form greater disparities across the world. "Murder on a Sunday" and "When the Levies Broke" helped me to see the government's role in maintaining systems of inequality. Overall, I feel this course is one that students should be required to take; such a condition would help in our struggle for a fair and equal world.

December 11, 2008

Injustice? ok...what's next?

So I have read through some of the blogs especially the ones about Globalization and "life and Debt in Jamaica" and I thought I share some my Ideas about social change.

In order to push a positive and effective global movement for economic and social justice, certain steps must be taken, first, the journey starts from you. For example, as Jerome Scott quotes Che Guevara he says “we must idealize this love of the people, the most sacred cause and make it one and indivisible? (Project South 12). In my opinion, one of the most important characteristic one must possess in order to effectively fight injustice is empathy. Learning to put yourself in another’s person’s situation, learning that we are all oppressed and it’s not always about you alone. We must also take into account Jerome Scott and Walda Katz-Fishman’s three building blocks for economic and social justice movement.
According to them, these building blocks are: Critical consciousness, vision and strategy. These building blocks are very important because in order to push for change, we must first understand “how the world works, our place in it, including our sense of history? (project south 12). Just like the old saying goes “you have to know where you came from in order to know where we are going.? It is important we assess our world with our critical eye. Vision: this is our personal “dream? for our family, community, country and the world. Do you want peace in the world? Do you want more access to education in your community? Do you wish wealth could be evenly distributed among the whole nation? These are examples of visions one may have. Strategy is “the plan we collectively make to change the world in which we live into the world we envision? (Project South 12). Often times we complain about problems confronting the world we live in but only a few people actually do something about it. The word “collectively? means we can’t do all these things alone. We have to join forces to produce a more effective result.
Now that you have a vision, “we must focus on developing a bottom-up leadership that is broad and deep. It must include leaders from all sections of society but concentrate on those most adversely affected. This phase of leadership development requires a process of education, with popular education being an important tool to create a shared vision and winning strategy? (Project South 13). As we can see education is a deadly weapon to fight social struggles. The methods project south used to fight back the concept of globalization can be seen as a model that is successful to fight back social inequalities. The exercise had group members sharing their experience with globalization and how it impacted their life. As each group was able to relate to one another is able to see the direct effective of globalization. “History repeats itself? the power within understanding history is an effective of method. They were able to prove how globalization has been part of society for many years.
The first step is being able to educate everyone on the importance of social changes and the direct impact of social struggles for many different people. As well as making sure “people are aware of their options? as Ore suggests. (Ore 710) After your raise consciousness awareness; you are able to create a vision that has short-term and long term goal that has to involve everyone in the group. This would also give them “the power to act on their options? (Ore 710). This also creates motivation to collectively fight for one cause.

As we sink deeper in the ideologies of equal opportunity and institutionalized racism that is a part of mechanism for racism. The idea of questioning our society; to be able recognize concept like white privilege and impact of race that is the fundamental of this inequalities, is yet to be sufficient. This makes it hard to believe we can get our society to begin demands to change our social structures and question our social construction. This society is faced with a lot of social struggles that is the implication of the social construction that resulted in these inequalities. “Our culture suppresses conversation about class privilege as well as race and gender privileges? (Ore, 564). Until we can gain knowledge on to escape the illusion of the mislaid of social construction and address it as a social struggles.

We gain knowledge by applying the definitions of popular education by educating everyone on what’s going on around us and having an on-going conversation/dialogue with one another. Motivating one another to fight for a common cause and creating strategies to tackle this monster called “globalization?. We can’t do these alone, it requires a collective effort from everyone regardless of race, class, gender, age, sexuality; it requires effort and input from people from all walks of live. While it’s natural to want change, it is important we keep in mind that not all changes would occur immediately. Some are slow and gradual, some changes may not even occur during our lifetime, but the joy is, at least we started something. Let’s follow the wise words of Mahatma Gandhi, who once said “be the change you want to see in the world!?

Project toolkit: The tool for change!

I really liked the tool kit's attitude and approach to change. one of the
things that caught my eye was the article by Jerome Scott and Walda
Katz-Fishman. In one of the paragraph Jerome quotes Che Guevara: "we must
idealize this love of the people, the most sacred cause and make it one and
indivisible" (12). In my opinion, one of the most important personal
characteristic one must possess to effectively fight for injustice: is
empathy. learning to put yourself in another person's situation.
Scott and Fishman goes on to explain the three building blocks for
economic and social justice movement which according to them are: critical
consciousness, vision and strategy. This building blocks I thought were
very important because in order for us to effectively fight for change, we
must first understand "how the world works, our place in it, including our
sense of history." (12). just like the old saying goes "you have to know
where you came from in order to know where you are going." It is important
we assess our world with our critical eye. vision: this is the way we see
the our family, community, country and the world. Do you want peace in the
world? Do you want more access to education in your community?, Do you wish
wealth could be evenly distributed among the whole nation? these are
examples of visions one may have. Strategy "the plan we collectively make
to change the world in which we live into the world we envision" (12). Often
times we complain about problems confronting the world we live in but only
a few people do something about it. The word is "collectively", meaning we
can't do all these things alone. We have to join forces somehow to produce
a more effective result.


I was also intrigued by the ideas/ definitions for popular education. All
the definitions were interesting one of the few definitions that specially
caught my eye were: "Egalitarian", "inclusive", "education with an
attitude", "Accessible and relevant" and "interactive."

Egalitarian: this is the idea that we are all equal and we have knowledge
to share and teach. this is important concept because most of the time we
are caught in the dance of a teacher vs. student. We don't always identify
ourselves as equal but usually see an authoritative figure.

Inclusive: this might be the most difficult one as it is human nature to be
ethnocentric. it is natural for us to view our culture, values as the right
way. The definition of inclusive forces us to see our selves in relation to
all people, even those who possess a different view or approach to live.
notice it said "in relation" not superior or inferior.

Education with an attitude: this calls for the idea that we are not
neutral. we all have ideas some of which have been shaped by experiences,
upbringing, race, class, etc.

while this tool is so optimistic and interesting it is important that the
change might be sudden but rather gradual even sometimes slow.

December 13, 2008

Taking the Next Step

As this semester quickly draws to a close I have begun to reflect back on what I have learned and to think about where one goes from here. I look at this country very differently than I did three and a half months ago. I judge my image in the mirror differently. I have noticed the preconceptions I have and the prejudices that I have carried my whole life, often without any thought. I look at my mother and father and can see how their beliefs have shaped me and I can even look back at my Grandmother and see the legacy that she brought from Russia and all of the effects that has on my life every day. I am much more aware than I was months ago of the social construction of race, class, gender and sexuality. I am more knowledgeable about capitalism and corporate economy. I can even talk about how the media has fed my ideas and images for historical events and social concepts. But I find myself still wondering what can I do to change the world I live in?
Professor Brewer spoke the other day about joining a group, organization, cause that you believe in. that one must exercise their voice for something they are passionate about. Here I am; a capable, intelligent, socially conscious individual. I have no reason not to be involved. I need to move beyond just buying fair trade coffee and recycling and the occasional volunteering I do for benefits. I need to get involved with at least one of the many causes that I am interested in. it is not enough to just have my own beliefs and live my life according to them. Change will not occur until the movement because too big to try and continue holding underground. In one of the videos we watched this semester, someone said that it is imperative to look around at the environment you find yourself in and do something to make the situation a little more equitable. One of the ideas that I liked best in this class, is that everyone will be in a situation at some point in their lives in which they are the most powerful. I like thinking this way because it reminds me that not only does everyone have value (of course!) but that they also have the power to influence change. I strongly believe that this country has come a long way and that great things are possible. I am really excited to be a part of it.

December 15, 2008

Jamaican life and debt

It is mind boggling that many people think that America stands for good and it tries to spread democracy around the world. What many people fail to understand about this country is that its whole policy is centered around power and staying as the number one power in the world. We can find inciteful information concerning this issue by examining Jamaica which is a country trying to comeup from poverty and have better economic power.

Jamaica was dominated by the English and now it is liberated. Since their liberation Jamaicans have had economic problems which had led to health and education problems as well. Exports are low and imports are high, resulting in downfall in an economic standpoint. Foreign food has destroyed local businesses due to their low cost compared to local food. All these are not the fault of the Jamaican government but international community as well and American stands as the leader within this community. Regulations imposed on Jamaicans by IMF (International monitory Fund) is a way of keeping this country in poverty and therefore as a result keeping the first world countries in power.

All this comes as a surprise to many patriots out there but our international policies are designed to keep us in power and others in poverty. Jamaica is one example in which American and the international community try to achieve this goal.

December 16, 2008

Why don't you do something?

So why don’t you do something?
As Somali refugees, foreign, without a grasp of the language and economically challenged we were outsiders of the community and constantly exposed to systematic racial policies in all aspects of life in Germany. Due to the constant exposure of racially motivated crimes I became immune and almost numb to racism. While I struggled to find my own path in fighting the process of becoming the unwanted inferior black child in the perfectly homogenous catholic town, I began to see my Diaspora experience as singular and personal. In the small town Rheinbach (West Germany), I was seen first and foremost as the black girl, second as the Muslim girl, and then as the immigrant/refugee girl. With the multiple identities that were assigned to me by the dominant culture, Somali wasn’t one of them. I began to see myself as a representative of the black race, since all my flaws and imperfections when it came to schooling or etiquettes were assigned to my supposedly ‘inferior’ race. While I never lost my Somalian identity, it was my black identity that I felt I had to constantly protect from scrutiny and disgrace.
After my family and I moved to the U.S and decided to settle down in Minneapolis I found myself in a dual culture shock. Even though it was expected that I would find myself having to get used to the new cultural norms, habits, and values of the American life, it was the rich and large Somali community in Minneapolis that came to surprise me on multiple levels. I soon found myself to be identified as a Somali female rather than just simply black in the public world of school and outside activities. My Muslim identity was constantly questioned due to the fact that it was normalized that every Muslim girl decided to wear the hijab. My Somalian identity that used to be such a personal and private part of my life in Germany suddenly became the focus of my identity in many conversations.
Although I have been always an active member of the Somalian community due to family ties and the connection to Mosque and prayer times on Fridays, I have never seen myself as and activist for the bettering of my community. Maybe it is because I never wanted to limit myself and my responsibility to give back to society to one community. I don’t believe that as a Somalian I have a greater obligation to my own community than any other. However it is not until recently that I notice how discontent and truly frustrated I had been with my community.
The rise in gang violence, criminal activities, and school drop outs in the Somali youth culture have been alarming and frightening. The generation gap and cultural gap between many younger Somali immigrants has been frightening. The unwillingness to talk about the real issues at hand is an epidemic that seems to be ignored by everyone. Issues such as STD, teenage pregnancy, and sexual activities of any sort can’t be openly talked about since those have to remain a private matter that is closely connected to modesty. While nobody is willing to talk about HIV, the number of Somali men and women that contract and live with it is alarmingly high.
While I continuously talk about these issues, and try to get a sympathetic ear that is as concerned as I am, I remain to be unheard. For most of my life I decided that somebody else could deal with that problem because I was going to invest my time into something more productive. I have learned from this class how dangerous it can be to develop such a perspective.
The death of a close friend and family member has made me realize that the reason I was able to distance myself from the destructive nature of the Somali community was because I was never truly affected by the dysfunctional nature. After my friend was killed by Somali gang members that were trying to protect their space, I became even more reluctant to get involved in the community. My feelings of resentment disgust and anger prevented me from ever considering looking into the deeply rooted causes of the ongoing crime within the community. After I read the last chapter of Tracy Ores book that we were reading all semester, I became aware of how little I have been doing to prevent the problems of the Somali community to escalate. I have talked about it, laughed about it, cried abut it, and even criticized the people that tried to do something about it, but never have I personally done something to create change. Now that I have taken this class I have learned to complicate my own notions of what it means to be critical of your community. While I am still afraid to become involved, I feel more responsibility to become active than I have ever before.


December 18, 2008

Life and Debt in Jamaica

For me, the most shocking thing about this video were the working conditions of the Jamaicans. The video depictd many Jamaicans working in unsanitary environments, under extremely low wages, with no compensation for overtime, and enforcement of child labor. I believe the above conditions constitute an institution known as sweatshops. It's just not right for their to be conditions like this anywhere in the world, and we need to do something about it. The more I think about how we can get rid of these injustices, the more I think about polices of today's world, polices and orgainzations such as IMF, world bank, and neoliberalism. I believe these institutions and polices are the main reasons why these injustices exist today.

First of all, neoliberalism gives to much power to corporations by making them private institutions. By making things private, you have no oversight of the practices that are being conducted. Private corporations are allowed use whatever antics they want as long as they are generating a profit. In the case of Jamaica, corporate companies such as DOVe, are allowed to exploit Jamaican workers for there banana products. The Jamaicans are forced to comply because they are under binding contracts with organizations such as the IMF and the World Bank.

INstitutions such as IMF and the World Bank feed onto the ideas of neoliberalism. They force developing countries like Jamaica to follow these new policies of free-trade, deregulation, and privatization. Otherwise, if the countries don't comply to these rules, they don't receive the loans from IMF and the World Bank. Originally the IMF and the World Bank were set up as instititions that could help developing countries by providing loans that would help the developing countries generate economic growth. Now, they force these countries into a system where they become subordinate to private corporations such as DOve.

For these reasons workers have to endure horrible working conditons because they have no power over these private institiutions. Under the policies of the IMF and the World Bank, they need the foreign investment to generate growth in their country. Developing countries like Jamaica are forced to comply with the new polices of neoliberalism and lose their independence of their own products. To get rid of these injustices, we need to reform these organziations and move away from the polices of neoliberalism.

Life and Debt in Jamaica

For me, the most shocking thing about this video were the working conditions of the Jamaicans. The video depictd many Jamaicans working in unsanitary environments, under extremely low wages, with no compensation for overtime, and enforcement of child labor. I believe the above conditions constitute an institution known as sweatshops. It's just not right for their to be conditions like this anywhere in the world, and we need to do something about it. The more I think about how we can get rid of these injustices, the more I think about polices of today's world, polices and orgainzations such as IMF, world bank, and neoliberalism. I believe these institutions and polices are the main reasons why these injustices exist today.

First of all, neoliberalism gives to much power to corporations by making them private institutions. By making things private, you have no oversight of the practices that are being conducted. Private corporations are allowed use whatever antics they want as long as they are generating a profit. In the case of Jamaica, corporate companies such as DOVe, are allowed to exploit Jamaican workers for there banana products. The Jamaicans are forced to comply because they are under binding contracts with organizations such as the IMF and the World Bank.

INstitutions such as IMF and the World Bank feed onto the ideas of neoliberalism. They force developing countries like Jamaica to follow these new policies of free-trade, deregulation, and privatization. Otherwise, if the countries don't comply to these rules, they don't receive the loans from IMF and the World Bank. Originally the IMF and the World Bank were set up as instititions that could help developing countries by providing loans that would help the developing countries generate economic growth. Now, they force these countries into a system where they become subordinate to private corporations such as DOve.

For these reasons workers have to endure horrible working conditons because they have no power over these private institiutions. Under the policies of the IMF and the World Bank, they need the foreign investment to generate growth in their country. Developing countries like Jamaica are forced to comply with the new polices of neoliberalism and lose their independence of their own products. To get rid of these injustices, we need to reform these organziations and move away from the polices of neoliberalism.

Globalization and the Future United States

What will become of America once the implications of Globalization have reduced our freedom both domestically and abroad? Between our failing educational system, the outsourcing of millions of jobs from our domestic labor forces, the increase in competition in the coming decades in industries that are historically American from foreign competitors like Japan, Germany, China, and India, and the corporate tyranny that is paralyzing less developed labor-intensive economies, we are subject to be just another run of the mill country by the middle of the century. The American dream that we have been so proud of for over a century is evaporating, and we have no say in our own futures anymore. Don't you think it's troubling that India and China are producing three times as many engineers as we are in America? Why should any aspiring college student in America want to enter into the workforce as an Engineer or IT specialist when once they graduate they'll have to move to a foreign country just to work for an American Corporation? It really makes no sense.

While they are destroying our environment, injecting chemicals into the food that we eat, sterilizing and disinfecting us with soaps and vaccines, penetrating our minds through television telling us their falsely generated realities, clothing us with corporate name brand logos that were sewed under slavery-like work conditions for children who are making 3/10ths of 1% of what the product was sold for, drinking $4 Starbucks coffee everyday while 50% of the world lives on less than $2 a day, eating, sleeping, breathing, living in an illusion. I believe that we have gone mad. We are Zombies. You, me, your Parents, your Girlfriend. We shop the same, have fun the same, and essentially think the same. We have no agency because we accept everything as a natural fact and never question why things are the way they are.

Even though I despise the fact that my clothes were made by kids in a sweatshop who couldn't purchase the shirt I'm wearing with a year's salary, why do I still buy them? Better yet, where else can I shop for clothes? They're all corporate. Damn near every one of them. Wheres the choice? It's nowhere. Its not for you to make. Its for you to subscribe to willingly. Why? because that's all you know. It's all you've ever known. There's no way out. Unless you learn how to sew your own clothes. And you will most likely be ridiculed by your peers because you dress differently. There's no need to defy the powers now, because they own you. They even own the future of your children. It sounds pessimistic, but it's the reality we face. And It sucks.

December 20, 2008

Even Obama Cannot Please Everybody

The controversy over Obama's picking of Paster Rick Warren is very fascinating to me.As we all know President -Elect Obama has chosen Paster Warren to lead the Prayer service at the Inaguaration which is sceduled on December 20.Now, the gay and lesbian community is furious becaue they say that Paster Warren opposes same sex marriage.They also claim that he has contributed for the passing of the legislation that was passed in California banning same sex marricage.Many gay and lesbian activists are acurally threatening to vote against Obama/democrats in the next election.On the otherhand many from Warren's own church are angry because he decided to lead teh prayer at Obama's inaguration because,according to them,Obama supports abortion.
Political analysts claim that gay and lesbians should not be furious over this issue because Obama himself doesn't support sanme sex marriage.So,if they supportd Obama knowing that he opposes same sex marriage why pick a fight now over .They think that the inaguration day is historical for both Obama and the rest of the coungry.So,this controversy might undermine the big moment.
I just feel sorry for Obama because he cannot please everybody.No mattaer whom he chooses there is somebody who's going to be unhappy.In fact some African American argue he should have picked an African American paster.I'm sure if he chose an African American paster some whites would accuse him of being racist.But the decision President -Elect Obama has made is less likely to change .So,it looks like Paster Warren is going to lead the Prayer at the inaguration.
I just think that gays and lesbians should focus onwhat Obama is going to about the gay/lesbian issue after he takes office not on the day of inaguration.That is that the most important thing is how his presidency is going to affect therir rights,one way or another.Untill that i think they should appreciate and celebrate this historic day .

Even Obama Cannot Please Everybody

The controversy over Obama's picking of Paster Rick Warren is very fascinating to me.As we all know President -Elect Obama has chosen Paster Warren to lead the Prayer service at the Inaguaration which is sceduled on December 20.Now, the gay and lesbian community is furious becaue they say that Paster Warren opposes same sex marriage.They also claim that he has contributed for the passing of the legislation that was passed in California banning same sex marricage.Many gay and lesbian activists are acurally threatening to vote against Obama/democrats in the next election.On the otherhand many from Warren's own church are angry because he decided to lead teh prayer at Obama's inaguration because,according to them,Obama supports abortion.
Political analysts claim that gay and lesbians should not be furious over this issue because Obama himself doesn't support sanme sex marriage.So,if they supportd Obama knowing that he opposes same sex marriage why pick a fight now over .They think that the inaguration day is historical for both Obama and the rest of the coungry.So,this controversy might undermine the big moment.
I just feel sorry for Obama because he cannot please everybody.No mattaer whom he chooses there is somebody who's going to be unhappy.In fact some African American argue he should have picked an African American paster.I'm sure if he chose an African American paster some whites would accuse him of being racist.But the decision President -Elect Obama has made is less likely to change .So,it looks like Paster Warren is going to lead the Prayer at the inaguration.
I just think that gays and lesbians should focus onwhat Obama is going to about the gay/lesbian issue after he takes office not on the day of inaguration.That is that the most important thing is how his presidency is going to affect therir rights,one way or another.Untill that i think they should appreciate and celebrate this historic day .