There's Something About Sarah

| 2 Comments

Lisa Belkin makes a statement with her feature on the public's fascination with Sarah Palin in the latest issue of The New York Times Magazine.  Belkin explains why women dislike Palin the most.

Contrary to what one would expect, women are the least supportive of Palin's political career.  They feel that Palin is in fact a step backward in the feminist movement because she doesn't have much to offer beyond looks. 

This feature is more of a trend story than a profile.  Although the subject is Sarah Palin, the story examines a trend surrouding Palin rather than looking exclusively at her.  The trend is that women were unsure of their feelings toward Palin at first, but quickly dismissed her as an embodiment of everything they fight against. 

A clever metaphor assimilating life to high school casts Palin as the popular, head cheerleader and "today's educated, ambitious women" as the student council presidents and debate team members.  I liked this style of writing because it offers a visual explanation of the phenomenon Belkin is drawing our attention toward. 

What I didn't like about this feature was how dramatic it is.  Belkin puts so much energy in portraying Palin as this monster, or woman everyone "loves to hate." 

Another aspect of this feature I didn't like was that is was slightly confusing.  Belkin seemed to contradict herself in emphasizing how unpopular Palin is among women yet she likens her to the popular "head cheerleader."

2 Comments

Stephanie,

I wrote a blog on this feature as well. This feature does a really good job of revealing the fact that features do not have to be just a profile. By pointing this out in your blog and calling it a trend story, I think that you really understand the meaning of a feature. I think you did a really good job in summarizing this article and really capturing the point that Belkin is trying to get across. By stating directly in your first paragraph what Belkin is explaining it eliminates any confusion of what is going on in the article. I think that you start really strong and bring the reader in immediately. When you mention the metaphor. I think this is really helpful in allowing the reader of your blog to capture what the main idea why women 'love to hate Sarah.'

I do agree that Belkin is rather dramatic about this article but I think that she does this for a reason. Belkin's goal is to make it clear to the reader how strong some women feel about Palin. The only way to do this is by being dramatic and really emphasizing how or why women hate her. I agree the word hate is rather strong. At times I feel like Belkin is being unfair to Palin but I think she does a good job in keeping her opinion out of it. In response to your last paragraph, what I took from this statement is a little different. At first, I had the same response to this. I had to read it a couple times in order to understand what she was really trying to say. When Belkin links Sarah to the head cheerleader she is associating this with her role in running for vice president. Many women at first looked up to Palin. She is a beautiful woman and women envied her for being able to have a family, be the governor etc. - she was doing everything. But when it came to her knowledge on topics that were asked from her during the campaign, women felt she was not prepared and uninformed. Belkin is saying the like a head cheerleader, Palin felt she could just flow through this and just get to the places she needs to through her looks and without working for it. This is an unfair assumption made about cheer leaders but that is what I took from it! Good work Steph!

Stephanie,

I wrote a blog on this feature as well. This feature does a really good job of revealing the fact that features do not have to be just a profile. By pointing this out in your blog and calling it a trend story, I think that you really understand the meaning of a feature. I think you did a really good job in summarizing this article and really capturing the point that Belkin is trying to get across. By stating directly in your first paragraph what Belkin is explaining it eliminates any confusion of what is going on in the article. I think that you start really strong and bring the reader in immediately. When you mention the metaphor. I think this is really helpful in allowing the reader of your blog to capture what the main idea why women 'love to hate Sarah.'

I do agree that Belkin is rather dramatic about this article but I think that she does this for a reason. Belkin's goal is to make it clear to the reader how strong some women feel about Palin. The only way to do this is by being dramatic and really emphasizing how or why women hate her. I agree the word hate is rather strong. At times I feel like Belkin is being unfair to Palin but I think she does a good job in keeping her opinion out of it. In response to your last paragraph, what I took from this statement is a little different. At first, I had the same response to this. I had to read it a couple times in order to understand what she was really trying to say. When Belkin links Sarah to the head cheerleader she is associating this with her role in running for vice president. Many women at first looked up to Palin. She is a beautiful woman and women envied her for being able to have a family, be the governor etc. - she was doing everything. But when it came to her knowledge on topics that were asked from her during the campaign, women felt she was not prepared and uninformed. Belkin is saying the like a head cheerleader, Palin felt she could just flow through this and just get to the places she needs to through her looks and without working for it. This is an unfair assumption made about cheer leaders but that is what I took from it! Good work Steph!

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This page contains a single entry by audet032 published on December 2, 2009 5:22 PM.

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