December 18, 2007








For my final project I wanted to attempt to make a video shot entirely in reverse to see what kind of unique effects I could create. The concept is similar to the stop motion assignment in that it changes the effects of time and space in the film. I wanted the video to be very stylized and payed close attention to detail especially in the editing and post production phase. The meaning of the film is open to interpretation but as I stated in class it is supposed to be me coping with the packers loss, a bit of a switch from what one would expect from the introduction. I had a lot of fun shooting this video but really enjoyed, as always, editing and adding music in final cut. I am very pleased with the way this project turned out and definitely plan on experimenting more with the concepts and possibilities made available through this format.









This video is a sequel to my last project. There were three worlds in the last video and I didn’t put much emphasis on the Human World so that‘s what I wanted to do in this one. The Lego guy draws himself a portal into our world to get a quarter. To do this project I had to do all of the stop motion on a green screen, capture some video, and in the editing process I had to chroma key the green out. Since I had to do the video and the stop motion separately it took a couple of tired before I got things to fit inside the screen properly. It also took a long time because I had to edit each individual picture using chroma key. Music isn’t my strongest point but I tired to change the music as the mood changes. I think it turned out okay but I like my first one better.








Continue reading "Project 3/4 Audio Visual" »

December 16, 2007

So, I might as well kill two birds with one stone here and write about the two artist talks that I went to. The first one I saw was done by Lisa Lapinski. She is a sculptor, but also a conceptual artist meandering in and out of a bunch of different discourses relating to everything from Wittgenstein to Rilke. In large part because of this her talk seemed unnecessarily convoluted. Actually, it was the worst artist talk I have ever seen. Maybe it was because she was nervous, but it was hard to tell if any of her pseudo-intellectual babble was valuable at all. I am all for relating disparate realms to the visual arts; nevertheless, her work so often didn't seem to necessitate any of the readings she was making of her pieces. It is a shame too, because as far as I know from students who talked one-on-one with her, she was one of the most intelligent and well-spoken people they had ever met. I can't really write much else about her though because there really isn't that much to say.

The talk by Lowry Sims, however, was very valuable. I was lucky enough to have her as a professor this semester, and she has been so consistently well-versed and articulate in the range of art related topics she is discussing. Her presentation on the inter-relationships between art, politics, and the environment was so hyper-focused and yet multifaceted. If there were anything to critique it would be that she focused primarily on 20th century art in the Western hemisphere. Then again, that also made sense in the context of her presentation. It could be stated too as a counter to this, that she presented a lot of work too made by non-Western artists working within a Western art context. In any event, I always find her explanations important in that her ability to trace movements is extraordinarily tight and perceptive. Even though there are similar dialogues that may stretch across countries and generations, she is able to pull them all under one framework. If art historians have any value at all it is in the way they can perform taxonomic operations in order to guide perceptions in new ways. Sims is a master at this task.

December 13, 2007

For my final project I attempted to make a short animation with handmade drawings. I was inspired by recent animation work I had seen to challenge myself with a new style of work. This project feels unfinished to me and is something I would like to continue working on. The final product seems more like a small episode that could be part of a larger collection. In ways that’s how I want it to read, as a narrative created out of a small, unscripted dialogue that one picks up almost as though they overheard it in passing. Ideally I would have liked for it to be projected in some public space, like a bus stop. This project might have been a little too ambitious. The final project came out somewhat successfully, but there were many technical aspects about producing animation work that I wish I would have known more about. In the end it seems like this project was more of a way for me to experiment with a different way of viewing images.

Continue reading "Final project" »

I did my artist presentation on Ilana Yahav, an Israeli artist who is best known for her videos and performances using sand on a glass table. I chose to do my presentation about her because it related to my final project and I definitely found sand to be a very unique medium in that it can show light and movement in ways that other media can not. I also thought her work was interesting because of almost over-the-top happy and lighthearted aesthetic it has, being that she cames from a country full of violence and blood-shed. Because of this, I feel she uses her art as a message a hope, which is always a good use for art in my opinion. For more information on Ilana and her art, she has a website at www.sandfantasy.com.

December 12, 2007

For my final project, I wanted to make a connection between different kinds of video, specifically live action video and stop motion animation. I chose to use sand and a light box as a medium because sand can do things that no other medium can do. It shows light in a very unique very, because the density of the sand allows different amounts of light to shine through. It also can be moved, sculpted, blown, etc. in ways that other media such as paper, clay, ink, plastic could never be used. I chose to do a story about a tree because I felt that the earth-like qualities of sand would accent the poetic tone I was going for. I also felt that to accomplish this aesthetic, I couldn't use the garage band's sound loops, so I made my music using garage band's digital keyboard instead. I definitely encountered several problems along the way; mainly because sand was a completely foreign medium to me when I started the project. I also had problems keeping the camera steady during the stop motion, because the camera had shoot pictures parallel to both the light box and the ground. I learned a lot about using sand as a medium during the process, and enjoyed using a medium that was completely foreign to me.







I thought I had posted this response earlier but can’t seem to find it on the blog so here we go again:

I went to see a presentation and talk by an artist named Suzanne Lacy. Lacy lives in Los Angeles California and currently holds a position in the Fine Arts Department at the Otis College of Art and Design. She specializes in performance art as well as installation. The two pieces that she discussed in depth during her talk were both performance art pieces of similar nature dealing with politics, racial and age discrimination, and identity.

“The Crystal Quilt? project consisted of over 400 elderly women, over the age of 60, and confronted the topic of how elderly people are seen to the public as well as how they view themselves. The women were arranged at various circular tables, dressed in similar colors and told to hold hands while they talked about their lives and accomplishments. After being able to talk to women in the same age demographic as one another, the women began to develop a more meaningful view of their own lives and were able to point out various important accomplishments and sacrifices that had been made throughout their lives. This performance was broadcast live on PBS which seemed to give it more significance.

“The Roof is on Fire? was another performance piece which was broadcast on various news channels including CNN. This project gathered around 200 teenagers, most of who came from the inner city, and arranged them in different automobiles parked on the roof of a parking structure. They were prompted to engage in dialogues regarding typical teenage life in the city and all the topics that they usually don’t get a chance to voice their side on (drugs, racial profiling, alcohol, teen pregnancy, etc.) The local police were also invited and seeing these two opposite forces coming together in a controlled environment without conflict was actually quite a powerful image. This piece to me seemed to have the biggest public impact.

I did my presentation on the Brothers Quay. A brief overview of them is that they were born in 1947 in Pennsylvania and now live and work in England. They are now well known stop motion artists but before they were so they worked as professional illustrators. They have done some music videos for a couple groups but did not do any for Tool like many people mistakingly believe. Most of their stop motion has a creaapy and dark atmosphere to them and often use dolls.

To watch some of their work just copy and paste this adress with the number at the end being from 6135-6151
https://mediamill.cla.umn.edu/mediamill/embed/(insert number here without parenthesis)

For my final project I started off with an idea that did not work out so I then decided to try and make an audio representation of what my day is like. In it I wanted to try and portray a depressed atmoshpere since I deal with depression quite a lot. To do this I tried to be minamalistic in the sounds I used for the day and to not have people interaction and also had a background track of sighs and other things. Overall I think that I got the mood across but that is because I know what I was trying to get across so I am not sure if other people get the same atmoshpere from it.









Lowery Stokes Sims
-Aesthetics or Utility-

I went to go see an artist presentation at the Weisman on December 5. The presenter was Lowery Stokes Sims. One of the first things that were brought to my attention is how many things she has done with her life, she has really been successful in her endeavors. The purpose of this presentation really focused around the environment and art, and how artists are begging to become the driving force behind some of the cultural and environmental change. The artwork that she showed centered on either involving artwork in nature or using artwork to show a statement about global warming. The piece that really stands out in my mind is the work where blue objects were placed on trees at the height that, if there was going to be a flood, the water would raise that high. The goal I assume behind this presentation was to open our eyes to how much influence artists really have on the global situation, and what we could do to make a difference. This coupled with the artwork that was shown really got that point across. However, honestly I was a tad disappointed with the presentation, even though I felt that it was really well done and of course she is an amazing person. One large problem for me is that we got to see none of Lowery's own artwork. Also it might just be me personally but I feel that the issue with global warming is just being taken out of proportion, everywhere I go I feel like people are talking about it. It just feels like were beating a dead horse.


Mathew Coolidge
-DvD recording of his presentaton at the Regis-

Coolidge is the founder of the Center for Land Use, which is based in California. Basically what this organization does is examine America’s landscape, and the things that people have done to that landscape, be it art or whatnot. It then shows the American public what our landscape and what we see is really like. “Take nature, add humans, observe results.? Coolidge goes on to talk about, how humans and people interpret the environment that they are surrounded in, and how your experience will be different depending your situations. The same area will be interpreted differently by different people because of their personal experience and how those experiences affect their views on life. One of the most interesting parts of the presentation for me personally was when he talked about the falling tree noise. In a forest in California a speaker has been set up so that each night it plays the sound of a falling tree. Reminded me of the saying, if a tree falls in the woods and there’s no one around to hear it does it make a noise? Going along with his speech, this is just my personal interpretation of this landscape and other people might have other opinions. Coolidge also talks about how he makes exhibits for people to be show in either museums or galleries that represents the surrounding environment.

Some video's of Golan Levin's work.

Continue reading "Artist Presentation: Golan Levin" »

Jim Denomie is an Anishinaabe (that’s an Ojibwe Indian to some and a Chippewa to others) artist who hails from the Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Ojibwe by way of Chicago and Minneapolis, His latest exhibition “Brown-eyed Rabbit? is currently being shown at the Bockly Gallery in South Minneapolis. Jim paints in a very expressionistic style in which he uses vibrant colors and loose brush strokes to convey a satirical story about contempery Native Americans and their perceived role in a maladaptive society in which Identity has been comodified and molested. He uses historical narratives and tried clichés from pop culture to evoke questions about our Nation and the estrangement of marginalized cultures. He tries to tear down these perceptions of Native America to help construct the evolved Native identity. A lot of his works depict how popular culture conceives Native American as wild shirtless, feather wearing, horse riding, primative savages set in a modern environment. This relationship appears abserd when you see a naked Indian riding a horse with a bow and arrow on a golf course- but the absurd is what Jim is trying to depict; the perceived identity of native Americans to that of the actual contemporary identity.

David Feinberg is a painter and an instructor here at the University of Minnesota. On Sunday December 9th there was a presentation of one of his projects “Voices to Vision? that involved Holocaust survivors and the use of art to help translate or transmit their stories of endurance. Five survivors; Joe Grosnacht, Murry Brandys, Sabrina Zimering, Lucy Smith, and Gina Kugler, along with Dr. Stephen Feinstein (the director of the Center of Holocaust and Genocide Studies) collaborated with David Fienberg in creating various pieces of art. These works ranged from traditional paintings, wood 3-dimensional constructions, and digital collage. Feinberg would construct a painting then apply drawings from the ‘survivors’ with-in his composition.
The survivors would first share their stories with David and his undergraduate students to create a dialogue in which a piece of art can be conceived, and transformed into a visual representation that reflects this new shared experience. Each piece is a true collaboration with the artist and the storyteller. It is the intension of this project to create a new way of seeing and experiencing issues of the Holocaust and other genocides to those who have little or no experiences of these terrible atrocities, thus “The experience from the past appearing in new visual forms attracts the curiosity and inquiry of the audience with the implication that the problem exists today and the dialogues are still active?.

David Feinberg is a painter and an instructor here at the University of Minnesota. On Sunday December 9th there was a presentation of one of his projects “Voices to Vision? that involved Holocaust survivors and the use of art to help translate or transmit their stories of endurance. Five survivors; Joe Grosnacht, Murry Brandys, Sabrina Zimering, Lucy Smith, and Gina Kugler, along with Dr. Stephen Feinstein (the director of the Center of Holocaust and Genocide Studies) collaborated with David Fienberg in creating various pieces of art. These works ranged from traditional paintings, wood 3-dimensional constructions, and digital collage. Feinberg would construct a painting then apply drawings from the ‘survivors’ with-in his composition.
The survivors would first share their stories with David and his undergraduate students to create a dialogue in which a piece of art can be conceived, and transformed into a visual representation that reflects this new shared experience. Each piece is a true collaboration with the artist and the storyteller. It is the intension of this project to create a new way of seeing and experiencing issues of the Holocaust and other genocides to those who have little or no experiences of these terrible atrocities, thus “The experience from the past appearing in new visual forms attracts the curiosity and inquiry of the audience with the implication that the problem exists today and the dialogues are still active?.

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