September 27, 2004

Using Instructional Design for Faculty Development in a Post-Secondary Technology-Enhanced Environment

Using Instructional Design for Faculty Development in a Post-Secondary Technology-Enhanced Environment.

Author: Collins Mauri MP
From: Educational technology
Date: 200311
Volume: 43
Issue: 6
ISSN: 0013-1962
Pages: 21-27

Abstract:
Presents an instructional design framework that stresses the alignment of learning outcomes, learning activities, and evaluation and feedback. Focuses on student learning rather than instructional input; encourages faculty development to enable them to design their own courses; considers course resources, practice activities, and interaction; and includes a planning worksheet. (Author/LRW)

Posted by belba002 at 3:00 PM

Faculty Technology Professional Development: A Pedagogical and Curricular Reform Model

Faculty Technology Professional Development: A Pedagogical and Curricular Reform Model.

Author: Graves Sherryl SBrowne<br />Date: 06002002<br />

Abstract: A technology professional development project with 16 arts and sciences and education faculty members engaged in the preparation of preservice teachers served as the vehicle for pedagogical and curricular reform. The objective of the project is to change the teaching and learning of preservice teachers through the adoption and integration of instruction technology by teacher educators. The barriers and supports to meaningful and appropriate inclusion of instructional technology by faculty were identified from data collected via qualitative and quantitative methods during a single academic year at an urban, public college. Barriers included bureaucratic obstacles, cultural features of professional programs and elements indicating individual resistance to change. Components of the professional development that facilitated pedagogical and curricular reform included the use of support teams, a project bulletin, and onsite, just-in-time technology support. (Contains 15 references and 4 figures.) (Author)

Posted by belba002 at 2:48 PM

Developing Faculty To Use Technology: Programs and Strategies To Enhance Teaching

Developing Faculty To Use Technology: Programs and Strategies To Enhance Teaching.

Author: Brown David DG<br />Date: 00002003<br />ISBN: 1-882982-62-2<br />

Abstract: The chapters in this collection tell how a wide range of universities implemented successful faculty development programs to help faculty use technology in their teaching. In more than 70 brief chapters divided into 7 sections, the book provides practical advice on how to integrate technology into teaching and learning activities. The sections are: (1) "Philosophy" (9 chapters); (2) "Communication" (11 chapters); (3) "Staffing and Support Strategies" (14 chapters); (4) "Teaching Environments" (6 chapters); (5) "Model Programs" (20 chapters); (6) "Assessment of Student Programs" (5 chapters); and (7) "Assessing the Effect of Technology on Learning" (6 chapters). (SLD)

Posted by belba002 at 2:46 PM

Critical Examination of the Use of Online Technologies in Diverse Courses at a Large Comprehensive University

Critical Examination of the Use of Online Technologies in Diverse Courses at a Large Comprehensive University.

Author: Monaghan James JM<br />Date: 11002001<br />

Abstract: This paper explores cases of three classes that implemented online teaching and learning technologies as part of a university- wide faculty development grant program. Students' satisfaction with key components of the learning experiences was examined. Instruments included students' pre-assessments and post assessments; an instructors' post survey; course syllabi; grant proposals; and instructors' end of grant reports. The paper presents implications for campus wide implementation of online teaching and learning technologies. A model for implementing innovative technologies campus wide is included in the discussion. The seven steps of an Online Teaching Support Model are outlined: planning and preparation; funding; instructional design and training; instructional materials development and testing; implementation; evaluation; and dissemination. Ten tables present findings. Based on findings, it appears clear that, in all three courses, students were satisfied with the connections made between the objective of the course and the assessment used. This would imply that the courses were relatively well designed. However, though the courses were relatively well received, it appears that improvement could have been made in the effective use of online technologies. (Contains 10 references.) (Author/AEF)

Posted by belba002 at 2:43 PM