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John Shutske to Wisconsin

I know that John leaves a nearly twenty year record of outstanding work here at Minnesota. He will be missed. He is a farm boy who understands the importance of agriculture to Midwestern states. With best wishes for continued success in your new position, John.



From the Wisconsin website:


John Shutske, a University of Minnesota specialist in agricultural and food system safety, health and security, has been appointed as the new associate dean for agriculture and natural resources extension in the UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and UW-Extension program director for agricultural and natural resources.

“My research and Extension programs explore and educate to protect worker and public health as agricultural technology and practices change,? Shutske says. “We’ve worked on a range of mechanical, chemical, biological, and animal hazards for many audiences. I am particularly proud of our Extension and research focused on protection of farm families, children, immigrant workers, and other vulnerable audiences.

He has also worked on efforts to protect businesses and consumers from potential food system terrorism threats, and to address such emerging issues as avian influenza, foodborne illnesses, and human pathogens in wastewater.

The decision to come to Wisconsin was an easy one, Shutske says.

“There’s a special spirit at the University of Wisconsin,? he says. “I saw that spirit up close as I interviewed for this position and had a chance to visit with a dynamic group of people.

“The agricultural, food and natural resource industries are economically and culturally important in Wisconsin, and the partnership between these industries and the university is impressive,? he says.

“I see a strong desire in Wisconsin to continue to be a worldwide leader, working in partnership with agricultural producers, the food, energy, and natural resource industries, and communities as they work with us through critically important changes in the next 20 years,? he adds.

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