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Where Do Students Really Want to Go?

Big Ten Yield


UD has an interesting story about the use of psychics by NYU to increase their yield
- the percentage of applicants accepted by a university who end up enrolling in the fall. Please note the date of this post.

US News has an admit table in their 2008 version that reflects data from 2006. Thus things may have changed slightly, but general trends are obvious. The yield is a contributor to overall rankings, so colleges and universities will do anything [including the use of psychics] to get this up.

Let's first look at how the BigTen schools do. Contrary to what you might hear from OurLeaders, these are our actual competition. If we don't do well here, you can forget about "ambitious aspirations to be one of the top three research universities in the world." In fact, if we don't start worrying about the other BigTen schools they are going to (continue to ?) clean our clock.

USNews Rank/ Acceptance/ Yield

57 Ohio State 68% 51%

38 Illinois 65% 50%

71 Michigan State 73% 44%

25 Michigan 47% 44%

38 Wisconsin 58% 42%

48 Penns State 58% 40%

75 Indiana 80% 38%

71 Minnesota 57% 38%

64 Iowa 83% 36%

64 Purdue 85% 35%

14 Northwestern 30% 38%

And then let's look at the top 25. It is a strange mixture of the usual suspects - if you get admitted there, you go - and places like BYU, Yeshiva, Notre Dame and Georgetown, together with a large number of strong public institutions.

Top Twenty Five by Yield - ( >25 due to tie at bottom)

USNews Rank/ Acceptance/ Yield

79 Brigham Young 70% 79%
2 Harvard University 9% 79%
1 Princeton University 10% 69%
4 Stanford University 11% 67%
7 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 13% 66%
91 University of Nebraska—Lincoln 73% 66%
5 University of Pennsylvania 18% 66%
52 Yeshiva University 79% 66%
49 University of Florida 48% 63%
62 Texas A&M University—College Station 77% 59%
14 Brown University 14% 58%
9 Columbia University 12% 58%
19 University of Notre Dame 27% 58%
28 University of North Carolina 34% 57%
44 University of Texas—Austin 49% 56%
59 University of Georgia 58% 55%
85 University of Kansas 77% 53%
57 Ohio State University 68% 51%
23 University of Virginia 37% 51%
91 University of Alabama 70% 50%

11 Dartmouth College 16% 50%
38 University of Illinois 65% 50%
85 North Carolina State University 61% 48%
42 University of Washington 68% 48%

12 Cornell University 25% 47%
23 Georgetown University 22% 47%
91 University of Missouri 78% 47%
96 University of Tennessee 74% 47%

It doesn't take a rocket scientist or a department of institutional research to figure out what is going on here. It is noteworthy that many public institutions that have quite respectable yields are not necessarily great research powerhouses.

According to USNews:

If a school has a high yield (a large proportion of those admitted enroll), it means that the school is most likely very popular with a top reputation and that the students are highly motivated to go there. A very low yield means that the school could be a “safety? or second choice for many of those who apply.
Think about it, Bob, Tom?

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