Benjamin, Walter. The Arcades Project

Benjamin, Walter. The Arcades Project. Howard Eiland and Kevin McLaughlin, Trans. Cambridge: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press. 1999.






Related Fragments:
The Flaneur and the Marketplace
In the flaneur, the intelligentsia sets foot in the marketplace—ostensibly to look around, but in truth to find a buyer. [B 10]...
Phantasmagoria and Mythic Anguish
Blanqui’s cosmic speculation conveys this lesson: that humanity will be prey to a mythic anguish so long as phantasmagoria occupies a place in it. [B 15]...
Boredom is the threshold to great deeds
We are bored when we don’t know what we are waiting for. That we do know, or think we know, is nearly always the expression of our superficiality or inattention. Boredom is the threshold to great deeds—Now, it would be...
In the idea of eternal recurrence, the historicism of the nineteenth century capsizes
In the idea of eternal recurrence, the historicism of the nineteenth century capsizes. As a result, every tradition, even the most recent, becomes the legacy of something that has already run its course in the immemorial night of the ages....
what writers say
Never trust what writers say about their own writings. [B 203]...
Collectors are beings with tactile instincts
Possession and having are allied with the tactile, and stand in a certain opposition to the optical. Collectors are beings with tactile instincts. Moreover, with the recent turn away from naturalism, the primacy of the optical that was determinate for...
Allegory and the fetish character of the commodity
Broken-down matter: the elevation of the commodity to the status of allegory. Allegory and the fetish character of the commodity. [B 207]...
Collecting
Collecting is a primal phenomenon of study: the student collects knowledge. [B 210]...
The allegorist is, as it were, the polar opposite of the collector
Perhaps the most deeply hidden motive of the person who collects can be described in this way: he takes up the struggle against dispersion. Right from the start, the great collector is struck by the confusion, by the scatter, in...
Method of this project: literary montage
Method of this project: literary montage. I needn’t say anything. Merely show. I shall purloin no valuables, appropriate no ingenious formulations. But the rags, the refuse—these I will not inventory but allow, in the only wa...
the highest degree the art of citing without quotation marks
This work has to develop to the highest degree the art of citing without quotation marks. Its theory is intimately related to that of montage. [Arcades Project 458]...
rung by rung, according as chance would offer a narrow foothold
How this work was written: rung by rung, according as chance would offer a narrow foothold, and always like someone who scales dangerous heights and never allows himself a moment to look around, for fear of becoming dizzy (but also...
a blotting pad to ink
My thinking is related to theology as a blotting pad is related to ink. It is saturated with it. Were one to go by the blotter, however, nothing of what is written would remain. [Arcades Project 471]...
An image that emerges suddenly, in a flash
The dialectical image is an image that emerges suddenly, in a flash. What has been is to be held fast—as an image flashing up in the now of its recongnizability. The rescue that is carried out by these means—and only...
image is dialectics at a standstill
It’s not that what is past casts its light on what is present, or what is present its light on what is past’ rather, image is that wherein what has been comes together in a flash with the now to...
Abbreviated thoughts
The difficulties Tiedemann ascribes to The Arcades Project seem to apply to N@aS as well. The question of whether I plan to "retain them in the course of [my] work" is more difficult - these are meant to stay fragments,...
Exposé Three: Narrativity @ a Standstill
[back to Exposé Two] Kafka could understand things only in the form of a gestus, and this gestus which he did not understand constitutes the cloudy part of the parables. Kafka's writings emanate from it. [link] The "gestus", or gesture,...
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