June 2011 Archives

RefWorks 2.0 and RefShare are now available

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RefWorks is a simple to use online citation manager, that captures, organizes, stores, shares, cites and manipulates information generated by multiple sources.

RefWorks 2.0 is a new, user-friendly interface that functions the same way as the current iteration (now branded as "RefWorks Classic").

When you log into your RefWorks account, you'll notice that a new RefWorks 2.0 button/link has been added to the main toolbar:

RW2.0.2.jpg


If you currently have a RefWorks account, you have the option to upgrade your account to the new 2.0 version by clicking the link in the upper-right corner of your RefWorks page that you see illustrated above.

All RefWorks accounts will default to the 2.0 interface by the start of the fall semester.

RefShare is a feature of RefWorks that is newly available at the University of Minnesota. RefShare allows you to share your RefWorks folders with collaborators both inside and outside of the University.

RefShare.jpg

Select the Share tab from the main RefWorks 2.0 page to start sharing your folders.

Learn more about how to use RefShare here.

For more information on using RefWorks 2.0, please see these resources:

Tutorials from RefWorks
Handouts from University Libraries
Upcoming workshops from University Libraries

Read It Later

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Published in Monday Memo April 4, 2011

How many tabs are open in your browser at the end of the day? If you often find yourself glancing at links that you really do want to read (just not right now), take a look at Read it Later at: http://readitlaterlist.com/ . Read it Later (RIL) is a bookmarking tool that integrates with your browser and syncs your bookmarks to the cloud and whatever computers or other devices you choose. RIL extensions are available for most browsers, and applications are available for iPhone/iPad, Android, and other mobile devices. In your browser, RIL adds a button to the address bar or toolbar. Just click it to save the page to your RIL account. Open your browser at home, or the RIL application on your mobile device, and links to the pages you want to read are there waiting for you. RIL also integrates with Google Reader, so you can skim your feeds and mark interesting items for later.

Speaking of RSS feeds, you can subscribe to a feed of your own items (unread, read, or all). I've been experimenting with using sending my Read it Later unread items feed to my Kindle for offline reading during my morning bus ride.

RIL is very similar to another tool, Instapaper. If you'd like some help choosing the one that's right for you, take a look at Lifehacker's comparison at:http://lifehacker.com/#!5622433/battle-of-the-bookmark+and+read+later-apps-instapaper-vs-read-it-later or this more opinionated comparison at:http://www.forbes.com/fdc/welcome_mjx.shtml .

Disclaimer: When considering use of this or any hosted service, note that private and confidential University data (link at:http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/Operations/OPMisc/INTERNALACCESS_APPB.html) must not be stored on vendor or Internet sites or systems, unless a University contract approved by the Office of the General Counsel is in place with that vendor or site. For questions, please contact Libraries Autosys at: autosys@umn.edu .

- Jan Fransen, on behalf of the Current Awareness and Personal Information Management Collaborative

Alternatives to Google

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Published in Monday Memo February 14, 2011

Are you one of the 66% of U.S. web searchers who uses Google as their primary web search engine? You might want to give some of the other newer search engines a try and see how your results differ from a Google search. Here are a few to consider, and why.

Bing
Microsoft debuted this search engine in 2009 and it is the search engine behind Yahoo Search as well. Bing has a nice travel search engine that compares prices on multiple airlines. It integrates a farecasting technology that predicts whether your airfare is likely to rise or fall. It also pulls together useful consumer information on products under its shopping tab.

Blekko
Blekko pre-screens your results to limit results to sites they have deemed as trustworthy. It uses categorical slashtags created by individuals to restrict your results to specified characteristics, allowing you to eliminate spam and hone in on good results.

Duck Duck Go
If you're concerned about the privacy of your results give Duck Duck Go a try. Duck Duck Go does not collect any personal information and your search terms are not shared with sites you visit. It also offers instant factual answers and unique ways of searching.

Wolfram Alpha
Wolfram Alpha is an answer engine that provides you with factual data and can compute answers from data. It offers detailed statistics in the medical arena with reports on symptoms, treatments, drugs and more. It also includes a wealth of scientific information as well as answers to basic factual questions.

Disclaimer: When considering use of this or any hosted service, note that private and confidential University data (link at:http://www.policy.umn.edu/Policies/Operations/OPMisc/INTERNALACCESS_APPB.html) must not be stored on vendor or Internet sites or systems, unless a University contract approved by the Office of the General Counsel is in place with that vendor or site. For questions, please contact Libraries Autosys at: autosys@umn.edu .

Have you found a useful feature on a non-Google search engine? We'd love to hear about it.

- Jody Kempf on behalf of the Current Awareness and Personal Information Management Collaborative

Scanning Options in the University Libraries

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Published in Monday Memo January 10, 2011

Electronic copies of your documents can be made in most of the libraries on campus. Here are some scanning locations:

Wilson Library:
- SMART Commons on first floor, two 8"x11" scanners at workstations with graphics software to manipulate images and email documents.
- Basement level, one photocopier-scanner, free to use; save to USB stick.
- Borchert Map Library, two 8"x11" scanners; three 11"x17" scanners at workstations with graphics software to manipulate images and email documents.
- Periodicals, six microfilm/microfiche scanner-copiers.

Walter Library:
- SMART Commons in room 204 Walter, two 8"x11" scanners at workstations with graphics software to manipulate images and email documents.
- Room 206, one microfilm/microfiche scanner, free to use; save to USB stick.

Magrath Library:
- Reference area, one 8"x11" scanner on the Uniprint station, free to use; save to USB stick.

BioMedical Library:
- Second Level, two 11"x17" scanners at workstations with graphics software to manipulate images and email documents.
- Room 207, one microfilm/microfiche scanner, free to use; save to USB stick.

For scanning options at the branch libraries or special collections, contact the unit directly. Most library locations provide scanners.

- Virginia Bach, on behalf of the Current Awareness and Personal Information Management Collaborative

Endnote Web

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EndNote Web is a lightweight, web-based version of EndNote that is available at no charge for UMN Twin Cities' faculty, students, and staff. Using EndNote Web, you can synchronize your desktop EndNote program with the web version allowing anytime, anywhere access to your EndNote libraries and content. You also can share your references with other EndNote Web users with the Manage my Groups feature. Direct export to the web version is an option for EBSCO, Web of Science, and other databases. Cite While You Write is also compatible with EndNote Web. To learn more and to set-up an account, use your umn.edu email address at: https://www.myendnoteweb.com or sign-up within our Web of Science.

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This page is an archive of entries from June 2011 listed from newest to oldest.

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