Links

Vote today for funds to support democratic conversations

Do you believe in bringing more diverse people into the work of strengthening our democracy? An EASY way for you to put action behind your belief is to vote on-line for the Crossing Borders project, which builds on more than a decade of work at the Jane Addams School for Democracy in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Crossing Borders was one of 20 projects selected for a grant by the Case Foundation from a national pool of 5,000 proposals. Now the foundation is asking people like YOU to choose which of the 20 finalists will receive an additional $15,000, for a total grant of $25,000.

Follow these easy steps to vote for Crossing Borders:

  1. Go to http://miyo.casefoundation.org/vote.

  2. Click on "Crossing Borders, St. Paul, MN," then "Vote for me." Do the same for three other projects you think should receive an additional $15,000.

  3. Enter your e-mail address (all votes must be confirmed by e-mail).

  4. When you receive an e-mail from the Case Foundation, click on the link to confirm your vote. From this page, you can also send an e-mail to friends and colleagues encouraging them to vote.


SPECIAL INCENTIVE TO ACT QUICKLY
: The first 10 people to correctly pick the Final Four grantees will receive $2,500 to donate to their favorite U.S.-based charity.

Continue reading this entry for a description of the Crossing Borders project and the Jane Addams School for Democracy.

Through Crossing Borders, an intergenerational group of Somali, Mexican, Peruvian, Hmong, Korean, and U.S.-born people will explore how to bring more diverse people into public work and strengthen democratic practices – both at the Jane Addams School for Democracy in St. Paul, and in towns throughout Minnesota. Among the project’s goals are bi-monthly team discussions, cross-cultural multimedia projects, and training on democratic education and outreach. The project will be led by Nan Kari, an experienced teacher and facilitator and a leader in the field of civic engagement with particular focus on engaging communities with immigrant and refugee populations.

The Jane Addams School for Democracy brings together immigrant families with college students and other community members to engage in dialogue, public work, and education grounded in the principle that everyone is a teacher and everyone is a learner. It was created in 1996 by residents of St. Paul’s West Side neighborhood, staff of Neighborhood House and the Center for Democracy and Citizenship, and students and faculty from the College of St. Catherine and University of Minnesota. Today, it is coordinated by staff of the Center for Democracy and Citizenship.

Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs