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McMaster receives Early Career Research Award

Kristen McMasterDepartment of Educational Psychology associate professor Kristen McMaster is a recipient of the 2011 Distinguished Early Career Research Award from the Division for Research of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC). This award recognizes individuals who have made outstanding scientific contributions in basic or applied research in special education within the first 10 years after receiving the doctoral degree. The award, cosponsored by the Donald D. Hammill Foundation, includes $1,000 to be presented at the Division for Research reception at the 2011 CEC Annual Convention and an invited presentation at the CEC convention the following year.

McMaster has contributed to the field with her research focusing on reading and writing difficulties of children with special needs. She has over 35 publications in peer-reviewed journals and has made numerous presentations at national and international conferences. Her work in the areas of peer-assisted learning and progress monitoring is particularly noteworthy. She has been awarded federal funding to support this important work.

"It is the nature of Kristen's research -- the systematic progression from 'laboratory' to applied settings -- that sets her work apart," said Professor Chris Espin, University of Leiden (formerly of the University of Minnesota).

McMaster is active in professional organizations, collaborates with numerous colleagues, and has mentored and advised numerous doctoral students. Professor Rollanda O'Connor, University of California-Riverside, noted, "For this stage in her career, she has been extraordinarily productive."

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