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July 26, 2011

Yolanda Majors to join C&I faculty as visiting professor

Yolanda J. Majors
Yolanda J. Majors, an associate professor of curriculum and instruction at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), will join the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Minnesota as a visiting associate professor during the 2011-2012 academic year. Dr. Majors will also hold a 50% appointment with the Minnesota Center for Reading Research (MCRR) to enhance its work with K-12 schools to support teachers, particularly those who teach students of poverty, as they learn to effectively teach youth from diverse backgrounds to become competent readers and writers. She will also provide leadership throughout the College of Education and Human Development to support under-represented pre-tenured faculty members with structured mentoring opportunities and teach in the English education program area.

June 22, 2011

Literacy researchers create innovative program for Mpls. Public Schools

Jennifer McComasSix Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) have been selected as locations for Path to Reading Excellence in School Sites (PRESS), a comprehensive approach to early literacy developed by Minnesota Center for Reading Research co-directors Lori Helman and Matthew Burns and educational psychology professor Jennifer McComas. The Target Foundation is donating $6 million to fund PRESS and other district literacy programs over the next three years. The selected schools are Marcy Open School, Anishinabe Academy, Anne Sullivan Communication Center, Pillsbury Elementary, Harvest Preparatory School and Best Academy.

Aimed at preparing all Minneapolis students to read by the third grade, PRESS expands upon research-based strategies developed via the Minnesota Reading First model, which improved student vocabulary, comprehension, word recognition, and fluency. Helman, Burns, and McComas, in partnership with The Minnesota Reading Corps, helped develop instructional strategies for students of all skill levels in kindergarten through third grade, including expanded support for English Language Learners.

Lori Helman"PRESS integrates the research on what is essential for student success in reading, the instructional practices that help learners advance, and the school-wide structures that ensure a continuous focus on data," said Helman, associate professor in curriculum and instruction. "There is evidence that each of these areas is critical to improved outcomes in student performance."

Through PRESS, the selected schools will benefit from four key elements:
• A focus on quality core instruction with a schedule that allows a literacy block of 90 minutes for instruction plus 30 additional minutes for supplemental intervention or enrichment in literacy;
• Professional development that allows teachers to continuously improve and share their learning as well as monitor the progress of each student;
• A systematic process for data collection and prescriptive data analyses; and
• Tiered interventions and support for students who are not making adequate progress toward reading proficiency.
Matthew Burns
"What makes PRESS unique is: A, the melding of different research-based components, the likes of which has not been done before, and B, the addressing of core principles and practices, rather than implementing of programs," said Burns, professor in educational psychology.

Through an ongoing partnership that includes the Minnesota Reading Corps, University faculty and graduate students will provide coaching and support over the next three years.

Helman explains that the long-term goals of the project extend far beyond the initial six sites. "We will learn a lot in our collaboration with the individual school sites, the MPS district and the charter school leadership teams. PRESS project leaders will document our challenges and solutions as we engage together to meet our goals. Based on the work in Minneapolis, we hope to extend the model to other schools across the country in years to come."

June 21, 2011

Literacy education Ph.D. candidate awarded dissertation fellowship

Candance Doerr-StevensCandance Doerr-Stevens, Ph.D. candidate in the literacy education program (Curriculum and Instruction), was awarded a 2011-12 Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship by the University of Minnesota Graduate School. These prestigious fellowships are given to select graduate students to allow them to devote full-time effort to their dissertations during their final year of study.

Doerr-Stevens's research examines the use of multiple modes of communication, such as image, sound, music, and motion, as students collaboratively create radio and film documentaries.

June 20, 2011

Ngo and Sato receive promotion

Bic NgoBic NgoBic Ngo (culture and teaching, C&I) and Misty Sato (science education, C&I) were both promoted from Assistant to Associate Professors, effective in fall 2011. Please congratulate them on their accomplishment.

June 7, 2011

Bigelow collaborates with English educators in Vietnam

BigelowM_180_2011.jpgMartha Bigelow, associate professor in the second languages and cultures program (Department of Curriculum and Instruction), was invited to Hanoi, Vietnam recently by the U.S. State Department and Hanoi University to work with six teams of English teacher educators on developing new courses for their undergraduate teacher education program.

For more information and photos, see the University of Languages and International Studies' blog story.

May 31, 2011

Award-winning Ph.D. candidate selected for school leader fellowship

Angela MansfieldAngela Mansfield, a literacy education Ph.D. student, was one out of the three students selected by Charter School Partners, a Minnesota-based non-profit charter support group, to go through a rigorous two-year school leader fellowship. The fellowship will culminate in the opening of high-performing, achievement-gap closing urban charter schools in the Twin Cities.

Mansfield, a Milken Educator Award Recipient, has been working with the Minneapolis Public Schools since 1997 as an exemplary teacher, a Reading First Literacy Coordinator, and, most recently, as a TAP mentor, providing instructional coaching to teachers to improve their performance as part of the well-regarded national System for Teacher and Student Advancement. Angela received a B.A. from Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA. and an M.Ed in literacy ('07) from CEHD.

May 19, 2011

Casey awarded Hauge Fellowship

Zac CaseyZac Casey, Ph.D. student in culture and teaching (Curriculum and Instruction), was awarded this year's Hauge Fellowship in the amount of $4,000. He is advised by Tim Lensmire.

Congratulations, Zac!

May 18, 2011

O'Brien delivers keynote address

David O'BrienDavid O'Brien, professor of literacy education (in the department of Curriculum and Instruction), presented the Keynote address at the International Reading Association's Technology in Literacy Special Interest Group meeting, May 9, 2011, in Orlando, FL. The talk, "Bridging Traditional and Digital Literacies: From Apprehension to Affordances," was based on a synthesis of O'Brien's research over the last 15 years focusing on the literacy engagement of adolescents, bridging traditional print literacy practices with digital literacies using media and multimodal texts.

Professor O'Brien was also the 2010 recipient of the Computers in Reading Research Award from IRA's Technology in Literacy Special Interest Group.

The International Reading Association is a nonprofit, global network of individuals and institutions committed to worldwide literacy since 1956. More than 70,000 members strong, the Association supports literacy professionals through a wide range of resources, advocacy efforts, volunteerism, and professional development activities. Members promote high levels of literacy for all by:

  • Improving the quality of reading instruction
  • Disseminating research and information about reading
  • Encouraging the lifetime reading habit

Galda receives Arbuthnot Award

Lee GaldaLee Galda, professor of literacy education, received the Arbuthnot Award for outstanding university teaching of children's and young adults' literature from the International Reading Association (IRA).

The IRA is a nonprofit, global network of individuals and institutions committed to worldwide literacy since 1956. More than 70,000 members strong, the association supports literacy professionals through a wide range of resources, advocacy efforts, volunteerism, and professional development activities. Members promote high levels of literacy for all by:

  • Improving the quality of reading instruction
  • Disseminating research and information about reading
  • Encouraging the lifetime reading habit

Galda has written 11 books and many book chapters, including the first chapter on children's literature in the Handbook of Reading Research (3rd edition), as well as articles in journals such as Reading Research Quarterly, Research in the Teaching of English, The Reading Teacher, Language Arts, and The New Advocate. She was children's books department editor for The Reading Teacher, coauthored the Professional Resources column for The New Advocate, was a contributing editor for The Riverbank Review, and a member of the 2003 Newbery Award Selection Committee. She also has served on selection committees for the Minnesota Book Awards. Her textbook, Literature and the Child, is now in its 7th edition.

May 17, 2011

McKnight Foundation funds literacy plan for CEHD partner school district

The McKnight Foundation has announced funding for a preK-3 reading initiative in collaboration with CEHD and the Brooklyn Center Independent School District #286. Part of a larger effort to improve early literacy, the McKnight funding will include an initial $150,000 grant to develop comprehensive strategies, with additional funding possible after the first year for implementation.

Earle Brown.jpg
The college's strong relationship with the district's Earle Brown Elementary School has become a model for success and shows the positive effects of support from literacy faculty in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction's elementary education program. "For six years, the district has partnered with the University of Minnesota to introduce the concept of a continuum that includes reading strategies, skills, and assessment tools within an elementary literacy framework," according to the McKnight announcement. Initial licensure candidates from the college have taken literacy education courses at Earle Brown.

More recently, CEHD's Teacher Education Redesign Initiative (TERI) has strengthened the bond with Earle Brown even more, said partnership coordinator Stacy Ernst. "The deepening relationship is an example of how the redesign of the way we 'do' partnerships helps all involved--districts, centers, programs--deepen, focus, and fund the work," she said. "The college's Educator Development and Research Center (EDRC) is working across college departments and centers to advocate for our school partners and university faculty, match interests/research needs, and coordinate new connections within the TERI Partner Network."

The McKnight early literacy planning grant involves several college centers: the Minnesota Center for Reading Research (MCRR), the Center for Early Education and Development (CEED), and EDRC. Through the TERI partnership, Earle Brown will benefit from CEHD's co-teaching teacher candidates from elementary education for year-long clinical experiences beginning in August 2011. The McKnight funding will enhance the college/district partnership, according to Brooklyn Center superintendent Keith Lester. "Reading is a gateway to lifelong learning, and all students deserve to be guided through it," he said. "The McKnight partnership will allow Earle Brown to fully coordinate the efforts of our dedicated teachers toward closing the achievement gap and moving each of our children toward this goal." MCRR and CEED will collaborate to help Brooklyn Center staff as they develop a plan for expanding their literacy framework to encompass a comprehensive Pre-K through third grade literacy continuum.

The McKnight funding is also being extended to Minneapolis Public Schools, which is another TERI partner and recently announced a Target corporation grant to support a research-based literacy initiative with MCRR aimed at preparing all Minneapolis students to read by the third grade.

May 11, 2011

PhD student Sara Levy wins thesis research grant

Sara Levy, a PhD student in social studies education (curriculum and instruction), received a competitive Thesis Research Grant from the Graduate School. The grant covers costs associated with thesis research, such as domestic travel and expenses for fieldwork, postage, and photocopying.

Ngo receives William T. Grant Foundation award

Bic NgoBic Ngo, assistant professor of culture and teaching in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, is one of five exceptional early-career researchers recently selected as a William T. Grant Scholar. The Scholars Program supports promising early-career researchers from diverse disciplines, who have demonstrated success in conducting high-quality research and are seeking to further develop and broaden their expertise. Ngo will receive $350,000 distributed over a five-year period for her new research study, "Innovating Culturally Relevant Pedagogy: Insights from Arts Programs Serving Immigrant Youth."

May 6, 2011

C&I students receive awards for photography contest

photo contest imagephoto contest imageOut of the numerous photographic entries submitted to C&I's 1st Annual Photo Contest, two students received awards for their outstanding images. Amy Frederick, a graduate student in the literacy education program, received the 1st place prize for her submission "Working with developing reader" and Suzan Koseoglu, a graduate student in the learning technologies program, received the 2nd place prize for her submission "LT Students getting ready for the Polar Plunge."

The photographic entries were judged on how well the image(s) portrayed a sense of C&I student life and culture.

Congratulations to Amy and Suzan!

May 5, 2011

Sato addresses teacher preparation and retention on KARE 11 news

Mistilina SatoA KARE 11 news story on the Bush Foundation's partnership with the University of Minnesota and 13 other educational institutions to promote statewide improvements in teacher recruitment, training, and support included comments by Misty Sato (assistant professor, curriculum and instruction), an expert on teacher development. Sato's comments indicated that better teacher preparation can help first-year teachers be more like career teachers, which may reduce the number of teachers who leave the field within their first four years.

The College of Education and Human Development, working closely with Minnesota school-district partners, is streamlining its teacher education curriculum based on current, high-quality research that ensures effective teaching, includes intensive field experiences under supervision of expert teachers, establishes mastery of state standards for content knowledge and teaching practice, and includes a three-to five-year induction process involving the support of college faculty and staff.

See the KARE 11 video clip below:

Science educator Barb Billington wins 2011 Philanthropic Leardrship Circle Award

BillingtonB-(90x135).jpgCurriculum and Instruction PhD student Barbara Billington (science education) has been selected to receive a Women's Philanthropic Leadership Circle Award for 2011. The award includes $1,500 for conference presentations and travel expenses.

Barb was selected from a large pool of highly qualified and impressive female graduate students to receive this prestigious award. The WPLC will be holding its annual awards celebration to honor Barb and other award recipients on June 15 in St Paul.

C&I faculty and students featured in CEHD's Connect magazine

Faculty members in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction are featured in CEHD's spring 2011 issue of Connect magazine. An article on educational reform for world stability highlighted Kendall King's (second languages and cultures) research on the preservation of endangered languages and into policies and practices for English language learners (ELL).

An article on climate change highlighted an Earthducation project and January visit by faculty members Charles Miller and Aaron Doering (learning technologies), with Romeric Zongo (PhD student in learning technologies), and LT media lab media specialist Justin Evidon.

Download the Spring 2011 issues of Connect magazine (PDF).

May 2, 2011

Faculty research undergirds new Minneapolis/Target literacy program

Matthew BurnsUniversity of Minnesota Center for Reading Research (MCRR) Co-Directors Lori Helman and Matthew Burns and Educational Psychology Professor Jennifer McComas have developed the comprehensive Path to Reading Excellence in School Sites (PRESS) that will be implemented in Minneapolis Public Schools. Aimed at preparing all Minneapolis students to read by the third grade, PRESS is based on a research-based approach to literacy. The district announced its partnership with Target Foundation, which is donating $6 million to district literacy programs over the next three years, in a press conference May 2.

Lori Helman Helman, Burns, and McComas, in partnership with The Minnesota Reading Corps, helped develop data-driven instructional strategies and interventions for students of all skill levels in grades K through 3 to assure each student receives needed teaching and interventions. This includes expanded support for English Language Learners. The partners have also established a professional development program to support literacy teachers as they make this systemic change.

Jennifer McComasThrough the ongoing partnership with The Minnesota Reading Corps, MCRR faculty and graduate students will provide ongoing coaching and support over the next three years of PRESS. University researchers will also investigate the effectiveness of these strategies to influence literacy objectives nationwide.

Target will fund the expansion of one to three additional tutors in all Minneapolis K-3 schools. Through a competitive application process, other select schools will receive intensive PRESS intervention strategies. These schools will be announced at a later date.

Read the Minneapolis Public Schools' official announcement.

April 28, 2011

University-YMCA family literacy parthership succeeds at Sheridan Elementary School

Literacy education faculty, students, and preservice teachers from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction partnered with the YMCA to promote family literacy at Sheridan Elementary School on April 14. The goal of the partnership was to create a family literacy event to benefit Minneapolis students of various ages and skill levels, educate students and their families about the importance of literacy, and provide Minneapolis families with tips and activities that they can use at home to work towards these goals.

Specifically, literacy instructors and preservice teachers enrolled in a course on foundations of literacy partnered with YMCA staff to plan and carry out the family literacy event. Independent, practice level activities engaged children and modeled for parents easy activities to do at home that do not require a lot of materials. In addition, members of Voices Merging, a multicultural student group at the University of Minnesota, demonstrated that literacy is also about self-expression.

Madey Heins Israelson, a literacy PhD student and event leader, and Deborah Dillon, literacy professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, represented the University in coordinating the fun and successful event.

April 27, 2011

Chase Lecture given by world-renowned children's book illustrator

Pinkney1.gifJerry Pinkney will deliver the 2011 Naomi C. Chase Lecture, "A Sense of Place, Real and Imagined," on May 4. Pinkney has illustrated over 100 children's books since 1964 and has been honored with the 2010 Caldecott Medal for The Lion and the Mouse, and Caldecott Honor Medals for Noah's Ark, John Henry, The Ugly Duckling, The Talking Eggs, and Mirandy and Brother Wind.

Pinkney has received five Coretta Scott King Awards, and four Coretta Scott King Honor Awards. His books have been translated into 16 languages and published in 14 countries. He was the American nominee for the international Hans Christian Andersen Award and is the 2011 American nominee for the international Astrid Lindgren Award, as well as numerous other awards and prizes. His lushly beautiful watercolor illustrations have delighted millions of children and adults alike, while also educating their eyes to the beauty and intricacy of fine art.

The lecture, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., in 120 Elmer L. Andersen Library, will be followed by a reception and autographing.

This annual event is free and open to the public, and is co-sponsored by the College of Education and Human Development, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and the Children's Literature Research Collections/Kerlan Collection, University of Minnesota.

April 15, 2011

LT well represented at AERA conference

LT, the learning technologies area of the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, was well represented at the American Educational Research Association (AERA) conference last week in New Orleans. Faculty, staff, and students participated in several presentations during the conference.

Suzan Koseoglu (LT PhD student): Understanding Complex Ecologies: An Investigation of Student Experiences in Adventure Learning Programs

Aaron Doering: Keynote Address for the Computer and Internet Applications in Education SIG Business Meeting

Joel Donna: Using Cloud-Computing Applications to Support Collaborative Scientific Inquiry: Examining Preservice Teachers' Perceived Barriers Toward Integration

Cassie Scharber, Charles Miller, Aaron Doering: Creative Conversations and Potential Collaborations Between Educational Technology Labs and Institutes

Charles Miller, Lucas Lecheler (LTML; LT PhD student): Reading, Writing, and Language E-Assessment for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing K-8 Learners

Charles Miller, Aaron Doering, Cassie Scharber: "Emerging": A Reconceptualization of Contemporary Technology Design and Integration Through a Lens of Adventure Learning

LTML_logo.png

April 5, 2011

Literacy Ph.D. candidate presents at 2011 Doctoral Research Showcase

Jessica E. Moyer, M.S., C.A.S. (Ph.D. candidate in literacy education, Curriculum and Instruction) presented at the 2011 Doctoral Research Showcase on her dissertation research- Teens Today Don't Read Any More: A Study of Differences in Interest and Comprehension Across Multiple Formats. Jessica's presentation is part of winning a 2010- 2011 doctoral fellowship from the university. She was recently featured in an article in Finance and Commerce, an independent newspaper reporting news, analysis and commentary on Minnesota business.

April 2, 2011

Covington Clarkson receives Josie R. Johnson Award

Lesa ClarksonLesa Covington Clarkson (associate professor of mathematics education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction) is the faculty/staff recipient of the 2011 Josie R. Johnson Human Rights and Social Justice Award. The award recognizes individuals who are passionately engaged in social justice, human rights, equity, and diversity, and through their principles and practices, exemplify Dr. Johnson's standard of excellence in creating respectful and inclusive living, learning, and working environments.

April 1, 2011

C&I Student Research Day culminates in presentation of awards

The Department of Curriculum and Instruction celebrated Student Research Day with over 30 students providing poster presentations to faculty and students in Peik Hall on March 25. The culmination of the event was the presentation of awards to four outstanding students.

NyachwayaJ.jpgDoerr-StevensC.jpgOutstanding Graduate Student Research Paper Award winners were Candance Doerr-Stevens and James Nyachwaya. Candace Doerr-Stevens is a doctoral student in the literacy education program specializing in critical literacy and English education (CLEE). Her research explores student engagement and identity construction through digital media composition. James Nyachwaya is a doctoral student in science education. His current research is tracking how changes in the instructor's approach to teaching the particulate nature of matter are producing improvements in student learning.

CaseyZ.jpgBillingtonB.jpgGraduate Student Instructor Award winners were Barbara Billington (science education) and Zachary Casey (culture and teaching). Highlights from the award nomination letter by Barb's advisor said, "Barb is unreservedly the best science teacher educator that I have met during my career and an excellent ambassador for our department." Zac's advisor wrote, "student comments point to how both the course content and Mr. Casey's instructional approaches promoted intense engagement with learning even as they focused attention on difficult and complex issues of diversity and difference." Both individuals were recognized for the quality of their contributions to students in the department.

View a listing of Research Day 2011 Poster Presentations.

March 30, 2011

Three literacy education doctoral students present papers at conference

Three doctoral students from literacy education (in the department of Curriculum and Instruction) presented papers at the Assembly for Research of the National Council of Teachers of English. Candance Doerr-Stevens presented "Forging Space for New Identities and Literacy Practices through Digital Media Consumption of Radio Documentaries"; Heidi Jones presented "Oscillating Identities: Utlizing and Online Role Play in a Writing Methods Course"; and Rachel Tholen Hatten presented 21st Century Skills, the Push for Blended Classrooms, and the View from the Trenches." A total of eight literacy education students attended the conference.

Rachel Tholen HattenHeidi JonesCandance Doerr-Stevens

March 29, 2011

Literacy professors Dillon, O'Brien recognized for influential research

David O'BrienDeborah DillonReading researchers Deborah Dillon and David O'Brien (professors of literacy in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction) were noted for their "highly influential research in the field of literacy" by David Reinking (Eugene T. Moore Professor of Teacher Education, Clemson University) in his recent presidential address to members of the Literacy Research Association (LRA). Reinking stated in his address that an article by Dillon, O'Brien, and Elizabeth Heilman (Michigan State University) in the millennial issue of RRQ (Reading Research Quarterly) "should be required reading for all literacy researchers or those who wish to become one."

Reinking's address, along with the article, was included on a flash drive provided to the members of the association. Also included was a copy of Dillon's paper, delivered when she served as president of the organization (published in 2003). View Reinking's presidential address.

The Literacy Research Association is a community of scholars dedicated to promoting research that enriches the knowledge, understanding, and development of lifespan literacies in a multicultural and multilingual world. LRA is committed to ethical research that is rigorous, methodologically diverse, and socially responsible. LRA is dedicated to disseminating such research broadly so as to promote generative theories, informed practices and sound policies. Central to its mission, LRA mentors and supports future generations of literacy scholars.

March 22, 2011

Cynthia Lewis presents at the Assembly for Research of the National Council of Teachers of English conference

Cynthia LewisCynthia Lewis, Professor of critical literacy and english education (department of Curriculum and Instruction), presented a featured session at the Assembly for Research of the National Council of Teachers of English conference in Madison, Wisconsin on February 19th. Also presenting in the session entitled "Digital Media as Activism and Academics in an Urban High School: The DigMe Program" were English teacher and DigMe co-developer, Delainia Haug and David Cruz Nava, a graduate of Roosevelt High School who showed videos he created while a student in Haug's English classes and discussed his films as activism related to immigration reform. The session provided an overview of the digital media curriculum and the findings of a study on students' critical engagement in the class.

Eight graduate students from literacy education also attended the conference. Three students presented papers: Candance Doerr-Stevens presented "Forging Space for New Identities and Literacy Practices through Digital Media Consumption of Radio Documentaries"; Heidi Jones presented "Oscillating Identities: Utlizing and Online Role Play in a Writing Methods Course"; and Rachel Hatten presented 21st Century Skills, the Push for Blended Classrooms, and the View from the Trenches."

Roosevelt High students speak about their work in the DigMe program

DigMe studentsmore DigMe students English teacher Molly Vasich, a graduate from the M.Ed./initial licensure program in English education, and four students from the Digital Media Studies Program (DigMe) at Minneapolis Roosevelt High School visited instructor Rick Lybeck's English Education (teaching writing) class on March 3. Vasich and the students shared their experiences with DigMe, a partnership between Roosevelt and the Department of Curriculum and Instruction (CI), led by Cynthia Lewis and Cassie Scharber, who are studying the intersection of critical engagement, disciplinary learning, and digital media within a technology-mediated program in an urban high school.

Vasich discussed her curriculum incorporating both analysis and production of digital media in her English classes. Students Tiffany Alva, Dyami King, Yesenia Perez-Ramirez, and Olga Uraga talked about specific digital media projects, with a particular focus on how new literacy practices such as digital media composition compare and contrast with more traditional writing practices. Lewis, English education coordinator in CI, invited the guests to support pre-service English teachers in their developing understanding of the changing landscape of English as a discipline and the need for them to provide their future students with opportunities to analyze, interpret, and produce meaning through digital media.

March 14, 2011

Ngo recognized for early career contributions in education research

Bic NgoThe American Educational Research Association's (AERA) Committee on Scholars of Color in Education (CSCE) has named Bic Ngo, assistant professor of culture and teaching (Department of Curriculum and Instruction), as a recipient of the 2011 Early Career Contribution Award. This award recognizes early career scholars who have made significant contributions to the understanding of issues that disproportionately affect ethnic and social minority populations through rigorous scholarship and research. The award will be presented during AERA's annual meeting in New Orleans, April 8-10, 2011.

March 9, 2011

Learning technologies' faculty receive award for best research paper

Learning technologies' faculty--Aaron Doering, Charles Miller, and Cassie Scharber--received an award for the best research paper at the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education conference in Nashville, TN. The paper, "Designing with and for Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: The Evolution of GeoThentic," describes how a technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge (TPACK) framework informed the authors' design for GeoThentic, an online teaching and learning environment that focuses on engaging teachers and learners in solving real-world geography problems through use of geospatial technologies. The paper also discusses a set of assessment models within GeoThentic that can be used to assess teachers' TPACK.

Aaron DoeringCharles MillerCassie Scharber

March 1, 2011

C&I graduate wins AERA's Outstanding Mixed Methods Dissertation Award

Dr. Pamela WeselyThis year's winner for the Mixed Methods Research SIG Outstanding Mixed Methods Dissertation Award is Dr. Pamela M. Wesely, a Curriculum and Instruction (SLC) Ph.D. graduate (2009). Her adviser was Diane Tedick, and her dissertation was titled: The Language Learning Motivation of Early Adolescent French and Spanish Elementary Immersion Program Graduates.

Dr. Wesely is now Assistant Professor, Foreign Language and ESL Education, The University of Iowa.

This award recognizes an individual whose dissertation makes an outstanding contribution to the field of mixed methods research. The successful recipient will receive recognition by the SIG in the form of a $1,000 honorarium and will be invited to present the dissertation study at the SIG's Business Meeting at the 2011 AERA conference.

A panel of judges comprising experts in the field of mixed methods research evaluated the submissions this year based on the following criteria: quality of the completed research, contribution to theory and practice of mixed methods research, originality and appropriateness of the utilized mixed methods approach, quality and depth of resulting meta-inferences, and value of the findings in contributing to knowledge in education.

February 16, 2011

Thom Swiss co-organizes mobile internet conference

Thom SwissThom Swiss, professor of culture and teaching (CI), was co-organizer of the Materialities and Imaginaries of the Mobile Internet Conference held Feb 11-13 at Laurier University in Waterloo, Canada. The objective of the conference was to bring together an international group of scholars to develop a set of theoretical and methodological approaches to the interdisciplinary concept of "mobilities." Swiss's article on the topic of highly mobile students and the homeless, "Zombies. Children of Zombies!," is the lead article in the current issue of the Review of Education, Pedagogy, and Cultural Studies.

February 15, 2011

Looking back on DirecTrack


In the Winter 2011 Connect, two licensure students look back on their experiences as members of the first DirecTrack cohort. This program gives undergraduates the chance to be immersed in educational settings and to learn from education leaders even before they enter the licensure program .

Read more about hands-on experiences and DirecTrack in "Field Vision."

January 14, 2011

KARE 11 Extra featured Earthducation expedition launch

earthducation.jpgJanuary 13, 2011, KARE 11 Extra featured the launch of Earthducation's Expedition 1 to Burkina Faso, a land-locked country where the future will depend on the ability to provide a consistent supply of fresh water. Earthducation team members, led by Curriculum and Instruction's learning technologies' professors Aaron Doering and Charles Miller, are now in Burkina Faso, Africa.

Follow the Earthducation expedition on Twitter and www.earthducation.com for updates.

January 6, 2011

Learning technologies' team sets out for African expedition

earthducation.jpgOn January 7, Earthducation team members, consisting of learning technologies' faculty, staff, and graduate students, embark on their next expedition to Burkina Faso, in west Africa. The team, led by professors Aaron Doering and Charles Miller (Curriculum and Instruction), will visit schools, explore cultural and physical geography, and interview local people on their thoughts on education and sustainability.

The Earthducation research project is funded in part by a Discovery Grant from the Institute on the Environment, University of Minnesota. The grant will help support the learning technologies faculty in their research pursuits.

The mission behind Earthducation is to collaborate with cultures from around the globe to develop an ecological narrative based on two fundamental questions:

1. What is education to you?

2. Can education advance sustainability?

For more information on the Earthducation expedition, please read the recent UMNews article. See also the KARE11 story and the video below.

Follow the Earthducation expedition on Twitter and www.earthducation.com for updates.

December 10, 2010

MPR explores learning technologies' 'app class'

Aaron DoeringCharles MillerCharles Miller and Aaron Doering (professors in learning technologies, Curriculum & Instruction, and co-directors of the new LT Media Lab) were featured on Minnesota Public Radio's All Things Considered for their iPhone/iPad "app" design and development course. This is the first University app development course focused specifically on designing, developing, and integrating apps for education. The course, as well as an advanced app development course, will be offered again in fall 2011 - stay tuned!

Read the MPR story here or listen to the podcast below.

November 29, 2010

Learning technologies faculty rescue swan

Charles MillerAaron DoeringOver the Thanksgiving holiday break, Aaron Doering and Charles Miller (learning technologies, Curriculum and Instruction) rescued a trumpeter swan from the frigid water of Long Lake in Mahtomedi, MN. Upon noticing the clearly injured swan, Miller and Doering gathered their winter gear, canoed the icy water, and netted the swan. They took the swan to the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Roseville where a veterinarian was ready to treat it.

Read and watch the local and national news coverage of the swan rescue.


November 19, 2010

Walker presents national webinar on teacher-parent relationships

Susan WalkerAssociate Professor Susan Walker (family, youth, and community education, Curriculum and Instruction) was a presenter on a national webinar entitled "The Teacher-Parent Relationship: Using Professional Development to Improve Family and Community Engagement" on Nov. 18. The webinar was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education, The United Way, and the Harvard Family Research Project.

Along with speakers from the National PTA, Columbia University, and the Kansas Parent Information and Research Center (KPIRC), Walker presented the college's Teacher Education Redesign Initiative (TERI) and family and community engagement as a major thematic area in teacher preparation. The topic of the webinar attracted registrations that reached over 1,200 individuals. This was the fourth webinar in the series, Achieving Excellence and Innovation in Family, School, and Community Engagement, planned for 2010-11.

November 17, 2010

Alumna wins the Oscar of teaching

Jennifer Mitchell2.jpgCurriculum and Instruction alumna Jennifer Mitchell (B.S. '00, M.Ed. '03) has received the prestigious 2010 Milken Educator Award. Mitchell, a K-3 English and language teacher at Sojourner Truth Academy in north Minneapolis, received the honor at a school ceremony on Nov. 16. The award, which includes $25,000, goes to only 55 teachers nationwide each year.

Mitchell is director of curriculum and instruction at the charter school. "I wanted to be a teacher my whole life," she said in a Minneapolis Star Tribune story. "I didn't have the passion for it until I came here." She also plans to earn her principal's license and an educational leadership degree.

Watch Jennifer Mitchell receive the Milken award on YouTube.

For more information on Jennifer Mitchell and the Milken award, see the Minnesota Department of Education press release.

J.B. Mayo receives social justice award

J B MayoJ.B. Mayo, Jr., assistant professor in social studies education (Curriculum and Instruction), was recently awarded the Kipchoge Neftali Kirkland Social Justice Award at the annual meeting of the College University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) of the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS). Mayo was recognized for his conference paper entitled "Native Americans' Acceptance of Diversity: Lessons Learned from the Two Spirit Tradition." In this paper, Mayo calls upon social studies educators and K-12 teachers to encourage more inclusive perspectives/conversations on gender expression, and greater understanding of gender variance among their students. This more nuanced form of social learning may impact a variety of present-day social ills, including the incidence of teen suicide caused by homophobia.

The award is named after the late Dr. Kipchoge Neftali Kirkland, an educator, researcher, and spoken word artist. Dr. Kirkland was an inspiration and role model who strove to meet the needs of underserved and marginalized populations, especially through his work and activism.

November 12, 2010

Digital and media literacy white paper lauds DigMe program

The white paper-Digital and Media Literacy: A Plan of Action [.pdf] by The Aspen Institute and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, highlights the DigMe program in its report, which outlines a 10-point action plan with specific steps that policymakers, education officials, media professionals, and community advocates can take to develop a community education movement for digital and media literacy. A partnership between the University of Minnesota and Roosevelt High School (students pictured above) in Minneapolis, the DigMe program is designed to empower students to think critically, build meaning, and demonstrate their understanding across subjects through the use of digital media and technologies.

The DigMe program partners with University of Minnesota faculty and students in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction (Cynthia Lewis, professor of literacy eduction; Cassie Scharber, assistant professor of learning technologies; and doctoral students Jessica Dockter, literacy education; Lauren Causey, literacy eduction; Bjorn Pederson, learning technologies; Brian Lozenski, culture and teaching).

November 8, 2010

Ph.D. student receives Tekne award for innovations in K-12 teaching

scot hovan class.jpgThe Tekne: Innovation in Teaching Award recognizes innovative classroom use of technology in K-12 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education, and expands opportunities for students to be successful in technology-related careers.

Scot Hovan, Ph.D. student in science education (Department of Curriculum and Instruction) and engineering coordinator for the Mahtomedi school district, has been instrumental in the creation of the Mahtomedi Engineering Leadership Program (MELP). It currently consists of three facets: engineering curriculum, engineering integration, and community engagement. Through Hovan's relationship with the University of Minnesota's STEM Education Center, he has helped incorporate the use of Model Eliciting Activities (MEAs) in several non-engineering classes. Hovan also has led evening engineering events to promote awareness and excitement around engineering, regularly attracting over 500 community members. The community engagement activities of MELP also include engineering summer camps for kids and extracurricular engineering activities.

In addition to the integration of science and engineering into the ninth grade curriculum, Mahtomedi middle school students are now required to take engineering courses. This widespread implementation of engineering is pioneering the future of STEM education in Minnesota.

Congratulations to Scot for this well deserved reward!

November 3, 2010

Avery addressed international audience in China

Pat AveryPat Avery (professor, social studies education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction), gave a keynote speech at the 2010 Beijing International Forum on Citizenship Education for Children and Youths in China on October 22. The title of the presentation was "Deliberating About Controversial Public Issues as Part of Civic Education."

Researchers, educators, and practitioners attending the conference exchanged perspectives, views, innovations, and best practices nationally and globally in addressing school-based Interventions for the promotion of citizenship education for children and youths of diverse cultural backgrounds.


November 2, 2010

Sato comments in national news story on new Teacher Performance Assessment program

Mistilina SatoMisty Sato, assistant professor in curriculum and instruction, discusses Minnesota's leadership in adopting a new Teacher Performance Assessment program in a story that appeared in The Washington Post and several news sites across the country. Under the new program, teacher candidates will be required to meet more demanding standards, including video evaluation as student teachers in the classroom and assessment by teams of evaluators outside the college. Minnesota will be the first state to implement the new program in 2012.

"It's a big shift that the whole country is going through," said Sato in the Associated Press story. "It's going from 'What has your candidate experienced?' to what your candidate can do."

Sato, director of the college's Teacher Education Redesign Initiative, has been instrumental in adapting the new assessment program in Minnesota. The program is a joint project by a consortium that includes the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, the Council of Chief State School Officers, and Stanford University.

October 26, 2010

Diversity Dialogues Present Jarrett Gupton

Postdoctoral Fellow Jarrett Gupton, Ph.D., explores the educational and life experiences of homeless students. His current research focuses on improving educational access, equity, and opportunity for those furthest on the margins.

Gupton, from the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development, will address the ways in which homeless youth have come to define themselves and how they transverse educational systems to gain access to postsecondary education.

Date: 10/28/2010
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Location: 48 Peik Hall
Cost: Free
Please bring a bag lunch if you like.

October 14, 2010

Earthducation receives University Discovery Grant

Aaron DoeringEarthducation, a research project started by Aaron Doering, Charles Miller, and Cassie Scharber (learning technologies faculty in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction), received a Discovery Grant from the Institute on the Environment at the University of Minnesota. The grant will help support the learning technologies faculty in their research pursuits.

The mission behind Earthducation is to collaborate with cultures from around the globe to develop an ecological narrative based on two fundamental questions:


  1. What is education to you?

  2. Can education advance sustainability?

The new Discovery Grants cut across numerous campus units and involve many different departments, colleges and outside partners. The projects were selected through a rigorous review process involving outside national experts as well as internal strategic reviews

October 8, 2010

Assistant professor elected to serve on CUFA Board of the National Council for the Social Studies

J B MayoJ.B. Mayo, Jr. assistant professor in social studies education (Curriculum and Instruction), was elected to serve a two-year term on the College and University Faculty Assembly (CUFA) Board of the National Council for the Social Studies.

The purpose of the assembly is to promote the common interest of social studies educators in research, teaching, and other scholarly activities.

September 29, 2010

Doering showcases principles of online learning at Academic Health Center presentation

Aaron DoeringAaron Doering, associate professor of learning technologies (curriculum and instruction), will share principles of online learning in an October 14 interactive presentation and webinar session titled "Designing for Learning: Engaging Students and Teachers from the Arctic to Australia." The presentation, which will be held at Coffman Memorial Union Theater and broadcast as a webinar, is part of the Academic Health Center Teaching and Learning Series. The session is free and open to all, but requires registration. Doering holds the Bonnie Westby-Huebner Endowed Chair of Education and Technology.

September 24, 2010

Math education professor receives NSF Career Award

Tamara Moore

Tamara J. Moore (assistant professor of mathematics education, curriculum and instruction, and co-director of the STEM Education Center) has received a $400,109 Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation (NSF), to research implementing K-12 engineering standards through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) integration.

The award is one of NSF's highest honors for early-career faculty whose research builds a firm foundation for a lifetime of integrated contributions to research and education. The grant will begin October 1, 2010, and will continue for five years.

September 22, 2010

STEM Center helps students 'Reach for the Sky'

STEM students.jpgThe STEM Education Center's Reach for the Sky program, which works with students on the White Earth Reservation, is featured on the University's home page. The story, "Helping students reach higher," describes this innovative program, targeted at students in grades 4-8, that engages them in hands-on, culturally relevant activities in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines.

The center's co-director and associate professor Gillian Roehrig is quoted extensively in the story, which also features a video clip of students launching weather balloons, the highlight of this year's student projects (see video below).











September 8, 2010

Ph.D. elementary ed. alumnus co-edits book

VagleM-2010.jpgMark Vagle, who completed a Ph.D. (curriculum and instruction: elementary education) in 2006, is now an assistant professor of middle grades education in the Department of Elementary and Social Studies Education at The University of Georgia. Vagle has just announced the publication of a new book, Developmentalism in Early Childhood And Middle Grades Education: Critical Conversations on Readiness and Responsiveness, which he co-edited with Kyunghwa Lee.

Before working in higher education, Vagle taught in elementary and middle
schools and was a middle school assistant principal. His current research and teaching is described by the publisher "as a continual pursuit of the dynamic interaction (tension, struggle) between relational and technical dimensions of pedagogy."

In memoriam: John Manning

JManning2004.jpgProfessor Emeritus John Manning died on Sept 6, 2010. He was a world-renowned expert on reading education in the college for more than three decades, retiring in 2005. A popular personality on campus, he was also a visiting professor and lecturer at more than 300 major colleges and universities and served as consultant to more than 500 national agencies, state departments of education, and major urban and local community school districts. He was well known for his commitment to working with students and teachers in the Minneapolis Public Schools and for his efforts in some of the poorest communities in the United States, including his work for the Mississippi State Literacy Initiative.

In 1985 John was elected president of the International Reading Association (IRA) and was recognized as the association's outstanding teacher educator in reading in 1987. He received the association's lifetime achievement award in April 2010 and was a benefactor to IRA through a fund that supports the annual IRA John Chorlton Manning Public School Service Award.

A mass and burial will be held for John in Fall River, Massachusetts, on Saturday, Sept. 11. A memorial service will take place in Minneapolis (Dinkytown) at St. Lawrence Catholic Church, 1203 5th Street S.E., on Friday, Sept. 17 at 3:30 p.m.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to: The John Chorlton Manning Memorial Educational Fund, U.S. Bank - Apache, Attn: Sara Fellegy, 3928 Silver Lake Road, St. Anthony, MN 55421.

For more information, see John's obituary in the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

August 29, 2010

Reading researchers speak at World Congress on Reading

Deborah DillonDavid O'BrienProfessors David O'Brien and Deborah Dillon (Curriculum and Instruction) traveled to Auckland, New Zealand to present at the World Congress Meeting of the International Reading Association, July 13, 2010. "Building Infrastructures to Foster Literacy Leadership and Change," featured the research of Dillon, O'Brien, Houck, and Boehm on the creation of Minnesota Board of Teaching Reading Standards and policy issues impacting reading initiatives in the state of Minnesota. Their research will be used by members of the New Zealand Ministry of Education in their efforts to implement student and teacher reading standards in New Zealand. View image of O'Brien and Dillon with their daughter in NZ.

Professors Dillon and O'Brien were each awarded University of Minnesota International Travel Grants to offset a portion of the conference expenses. Deborah Dillon holds the Guy Bond Chair in Reading.

August 20, 2010

C&I alumna Boeser wins another national award

Elizabeth BoeserBloomington Jefferson High School teacher Elizabeth Boeser (Curriculum and Instruction, M.Ed. '08) has won the annual Media Literacy Award, the second consecutive year she has earned a national award for outstanding teaching by the National Council of Teachers of English.

Boeser was awarded the NCTE's 2009 High School Teacher of Excellence honor for excellent classroom teaching in high school English. The latest national award showcases teachers who have developed innovative approaches for integrating media and media literacy into their instruction.

See the KARE11.com story.

July 16, 2010

Literacy Ph.D. candidate receives leadership award

The University of Illinois' Graduate School of Library and Information
Science recently awarded Jessica E. Moyer, M.S., C.A.S. (Ph.D. candidate in literacy education, Curriculum and Instruction) their Alumni Leadership Award. Jessica is honored for her excellent writing, teaching and her professional presentations. The leadership award, is given to an alumnus who has graduated in the past ten years and who has shown leadership in the field of library and information science.

June 16, 2010

Two C&I grad. students receive distinguished award

Please join the Curriculum and Instruction community in congratulating
their two Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship recipients. Brant Miller
(PhD candidate in the science education track, adviser Gill Roehrig)
and Jessica Moyer (PhD candidate in the literacy education track,
adviser David O'Brien) have been awarded Doctoral Dissertation
Fellowships
for 2010-2011 from the Graduate School. This highly
competitive fellowship will support Miller and Moyer in their research
and dissertation research during the the 2010-11 academic year.
Miller's research involves looking at the development of science
agency in American Indian middle school students as a result of
experiencing a culturally relevant science, technology, engineering,
and mathematics (STEM) curriculum. Moyer's research is a study of
comprehension, engagement and interest across three leisure reading
formats: print books, e-books, and digital audiobooks among older
adolescents.

Professor's film/poem airs on French television


Thom SwissA film/poem written by Thom Swiss, professor of culture and teaching in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, will air on French television and in French-speaking Africa, for the next few months as part of a global media show, "Mensomadaire." The film, a collaboration with director Yoshi Sodeaka of Japan, is titled "Blind Side of a Secret" and includes spoken parts in English, French, and Dutch. View an early version
of the piece
.

May 20, 2010

Doctoral student recognized for excellence in UMNews story

Phebe jatau.jpgDoctoral candidate Phebe Veronica Jatau is one of four students highlighted in a UMNews story on research by recipients of the Graduate School's 2009-10 Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships. Her research focuses on high school dropout rates among northern Nigerian women and the gender gap and inequities that pervade the educational system. Jatau is in the literacy education track in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

Jatau is also featured in a University video called "Dissertations in one minute or less."

STEM Center featured on KARE 11

MooreT-t06.jpgTamara Moore, co-director of the STEM Education Center, and the center's project with a local school are the subject of a KARE 11 Sunrise segment, "What's Cool in Our School." The STEM Center has partnered with Central Middle School in Columbia Heights to create a pilot program integrating science, technology, engineering, and mathematics concepts in a new engineering class at the school.

Students in the class are learning to combine these concepts through the hands-on tasks of designing and making a cardboard chair that can support 200 pounds. Moore, assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, discusses the real-world applications of STEM with the students and describes how important it is to integrate STEM in teacher training and student learning.


May 14, 2010

Discover newly published books for young readers

NBFYR2010Thumb.jpgThe 2010 edition of New Books for Young Readers is now available. Read reviews of the best books published in 2009 for readers from preschool through high school ages. Looking for books to use in the classroom? A just-right selection for a child? Detailed descriptions of books for every reader and every purpose are included.

Use the online search engine to find books from the last decade by a favorite author or illustrator, such as Jane Yolen or Ed Young; books in a particular genre, such as informational science or historical fiction; books by reading level from preschool to adolescent readers; books by culture or area in the world, such as Korean-American or Eastern Africa; or books by key word, such as slavery or elephants.

Download the 2010 edition of New Books for Young Readers [PDF]

New Books for Young Readers is supported by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction; the Julie M. Jensen Endowment for Language Arts Education, honoring Professors Naomi C. Chase and Robert Dykstra; and by all the trade book publishers who send their books for our consideration; Rebecca Rapport, editor.

Culture and teaching student receives Hauge Fellowship

Lisa Johnson, a doctoral student in culture and teaching (Curriculum and Instruction) was recently awarded a Hauge Fellowship. She is advised by Tim Lensmire and Thom Swiss.

May 6, 2010

Doctoral student receives AERA award for research proposal

HansenS.jpgAt the recent annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Sarah Hansen received the 1st Place Proposal Award at the Division D (Measurement and Research Methodology) In-Progress Research Gala. Sarah's award-winning proposal featured ethnographic research that illuminated the discourse models informing Indian immigrant parents' school engagement experiences. As a recipient of the award, she will give an invited paper at the 2011 AERA Annual Meeting. Sarah is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction's culture and teaching track (Bic Ngo and Thom Swiss, co-advisers).

April 29, 2010

Thesis research grants awarded to Hansen and Smalkoski

Sarah Hansen.jpgSarah Hansen and Kari Smalkoski, doctoral students in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, have each been awarded Thesis Research Grant funds by the Graduate School. Grant funds help students cover expenses associated with their thesis research, such as domestic travel, fieldwork, postage, and photocopying.

Hansen's research (Bic Ngo and Thom Swiss, advisers) will explore the stories Indian-American participants at a community-based ethnic organization document about their everyday lives--stories that converse with, but also complicate, dominant discourses about what it means to be a South Asian youth in a global context.

Kari SmalkoskiSmalkoski's research (Bic Ngo and Tim Lensmire, adviser) examines the layers of multiplicity within the Hmong community by looking at the the ways in which Hmong masculinities and popular cultural practices impact males' non-school and school identities.

Graduate students Simmons and Martel receive awards

Two Ph.D. students received graduate student awards as part of Curriculum and Instruction's Graduate Student Research Day on April 9th. Annette Simmons, PhD student in Social Studies Education, received the Research Award for Excellence in Scholarship on Diversity. Her research examines how a group of Hmong immigrant adolescents conceptualize their citizenship in the United States. This award is meant to enhance academic understanding of diversity issues, particularly among historically underserved populations. Jason Martel received the Graduate Supervisor Award, which recognizes excellence in supervision among graduate supervisors who develop a positive rapport with supervisees to support their developing skills as teachers and tutors. Jason leads students to reflect on their own performance with high standards of professionalism.

April 27, 2010

Roosevelt High School's DigMe students tour campus

Students from Minneapolis Roosevelt High School's DigMe program visited the Twin Cities campus last week. The DigMe program partners with University of Minnesota faculty and students in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction (Cynthia Lewis, professor of literacy eduction; Cassie Scharber, assistant professor of learning technologies; and doctoral students Jessica Dockter, literacy education; Lauren Causey, literacy eduction; Bjorn Pederson, learning technologies; Brian Lozenski, culture and teaching).

Scott Redd (African and African-American Studies) and Anise McDowell (K-12 Outreach, CLA) collaborated on the planning of the campus visit and created many opportunities for the Roosevelt students to "see themselves" on campus as future Gophers. Led by two CLA Future Scholars, students toured the Black Student Union and LaRaza in Coffman Memorial Union, as well as the Multicultural Center for Academic Excellence. Lunch was sponsored by the Office for Equity and Diversity. Highlights of the visit included attending classes in African history and theatre, learning about digital media practices in one of the University's active learning classrooms, and shaking hands with President Bruininks.

The DigMe Digital Media Program mission is to empower students to think critically, build meaning, and demonstrate their understanding across all subjects by applying college preparatory, project based learning using digital technologies.

April 26, 2010

GoNorth! Greenland trek begins

The GoNorth! 2010 team has arrived in Greenland, and they are heading out on the trail. Join Aaron Doering, associate professor in learning technologies; Brant Miller, doctoral candidate in science education; and the rest of the GoNorth! team as they travel via dogsled across Greenland. K-12 classrooms around the world are participating in this latest educational adventure. Check out the latest update from the trail.

April 22, 2010

Rising Star Faculty Award goes to Bic Ngo

Bic NgoCEHD's Women's Philanthropic Leadership Circle has named Bic Ngo (assistant professor of culture and teaching in Curriculum and Instruction) as this year's recipient of the Rising Star Faculty Award given to a pre-tenure female faculty member. The Circle's annual awards celebration will be on Tuesday, June 15, 9-11 a.m., at the Town and Country Club in St. Paul. An email invitation to the college community will be sent in May. Congratulations Bic!

April 20, 2010

Misty Sato featured on Fox 9 News

Assistant professor Misty Sato (curriculum and instruction), an expert in teacher development, provided context regarding Gov. Tim Pawlenty's new education proposal. The live interview aired on Fox 9's 5 p.m. newscast April 19.


Pawlenty's proposal includes changes in the way teachers are licensed, paid, and given tenure. It was driven by the state's failure to secure the first round of Race to the Top funding and debate over whether Minnesota will apply for a possible second round.

April 19, 2010

Polar Huskies check in from Greenland

Professor Aaron Doering and the GoNorth! team are holed up at Thule Air Base, Greenland, pinned down by a blizzard. No one is even allowed outside of buildings, as winds gust upwards of 80 miles per hour. Read the complete blog post and follow them on their two-month journey.


The Thule base is GoNorth's point of disembarkation for Greenland 2010. The Polar Huskies plan to celebrate Earth Day on the trail climbing 10,000 feet to the top of Greenland's Ice Sheet. Follow their route to Siorapaluk, Greenland--the northernmost community in the world--and learn about climate change along the way.
Snowbound huskies

Chase Lecture 2010

Schmidt.jpgGary Schmidt will deliver the 2010 annual Chase Lecture on Wednesday, May 5th, at 4:30 pm in 120 Andersen Library, when he will speak about "How American Children's Literature Became American, and Why that Desperately Matters Today."

Schmidt is the author of thirty-five books, ranging from literary criticism to biography to works for child readers. Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy and The Wednesday Wars have won Newbery Honors, with Lizzie Bright also receiving a Printz Honor. He teaches children's literature, medieval literature, and creative writing at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, and, in the summer, is on the graduate faculty of Hamline University, where he teaches in the MFA for Writers of Children's Literature program. He lives in an 1830s house that is heated with wood--and he is mightily glad that spring is coming.

This annual event is co-sponsored by the College of Education and Human Development, Department of Curriculum & Instruction and the Children's Literature Research Collections/Kerlan Collection, University of Minnesota. Book sales courtesy of The Red Balloon Bookshop.

The Elmer L. Andersen Library is located at 222 - 21st Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Parking map: http://onestop.umn.edu/Maps/EALib/index.html
For additional information contact Cathy Zemke at zemke001@umn.edu or Dr.Lee Galda at galda001@umn.edu

Schmidt is the author of thirty-five books, ranging from literary criticism to biography to works for child readers. Lizzie Bright and the Buckminster Boy and The Wednesday Wars have won Newbery Honors, with Lizzie Bright also receiving a Printz Honor. He teaches children's literature, medieval literature, and creative writing at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, and, in the summer, is on the graduate faculty of Hamline University, where he teaches in the MFA for Writers of Children's Literature program. He lives in an 1830s house that is heated with wood--and he is mightily glad that spring is coming.

This annual event is co-sponsored by the College of Education and Human Development, Department of Curriculum & Instruction and the Children's Literature Research Collections/Kerlan Collection, University of Minnesota. Book sales courtesy of The Red Balloon Bookshop.

The Elmer L. Andersen Library is located at 222 - 21st Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455. Parking map: http://onestop.umn.edu/Maps/EALib/index.html
For additional information contact Cathy Zemke at zemke001@umn.edu or Dr.Lee Galda at galda001@umn.edu

April 13, 2010

O'Brien, Scharber co-edit digital literacy column

Cassie ScharberDavid O'BrienDavid O'Brien (professor of literacy education) and Cassie Scharber (assistant professor of learning technologies) in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction are the current editors of the Digital Literacies Department for the Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy (JAAL). They were invited to continue their tenure as the column's co-editors for 2010-2011. JAAL is a publication of the International Reading Association with 70,000 members worldwide. The latest column features an article written by O'Brien and Scharber entitled, "Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks: The Luxury of Digital Abundance."

Literacy Research Association chooses Beach as vice president-elect

Richard Beech

Richard Beach, professor of literacy education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, has been elected vice president-elect (to become president in Dec. 2012) by the Literacy Research Association (formerly National Reading Conference). The LRA is the premier research organization for literacy educators and has over 1,000 members internationally. Deborah Dillon, also a professor of literacy education and the Guy Bond Chair in Reading, was president of the National Reading Conference in 2002.

April 12, 2010

Alumni Pearson leads Berkeley graduate education

PDPc3bsm.jpgDavid Pearson (Ph.D. '69) learned much from his mentor, legendary literacy professor John Manning, as well as elementary education professor Robert Dykstra. He puts their guidance to use every day in his role as dean of the University of California-Berkely Graduate College of Education.

Read about the creative leadership Pearson has applied at a public university within the most cash-strapped state, in the Winter/Spring 2010 issue of Connect.

Sato, O'Brien featured in magazine story on teacher leadership

SatoM-2007.jpg Misty Sato, who specializes in teacher development, shares her expertise on developing mutually supportive school environments that acknowledge teachers' day-to-day leadership in the current issue of Connect, the college magazine.

obrien2002color.jpgThe article also highlights the work of professors David O'Brien and Deborah Dillon with Minneapolis middle school literacy teachers. Their engaged research develops teacher leaders who will help develop a culture of literacy in the schools.

The article also features alumna Martha Spriggs (M.Ed. ' 03).

Read the article in Connect.

Parent and family education featured in Connect

WalkerS-pref.jpgWhen all of the stakeholders--parents, community members, teachers, administrators--come together to collectively influence school-related decisions, student achievement improves. Parent and family education associate professor Susan Walker advises administrators to get out of the principal's office and out into the community if they want to foster parental leadership.

The article on collective leadership, "Come Together," can be found in the Winter/Spring 2010 Connect.

April 9, 2010

Exploring unresolved identities of urban immigrant youth

Bic NgoUnresolved Identities: Discourse, Ambivalence, and Urban Immigrant Students, by Bic Ngo, assistant professor of culture and teaching in curriculum and instruction, was recently published by SUNY Press. In her ethnographic study of Lao American students at an urban, public high school, Ngo shows how simplistic accounts of these students smooth over unfinished, precarious identities and contested social relations. Exploring the ways that immigrant youth identities are shaped by dominant discourses that simplify and confine their experiences within binary categories of good/bad, traditional/modern, and success/failure, she unmasks and examines the stories we tell about them, and unsettles the hegemony of discourses that frame identities within discrete dualisms.

Rather than being cohesive, the identity negotiations of Lao American students are responses that modify, resist, or echo these discourses. Ngo argues that while Lao American students are changing what it means to be "urban" and "immigrant" youth, most people are unable to read them as doing so, and instead see the youth as confused, backward, and problematic. By illuminating the discursive practices of identity, this study underscores the need to conceptualize urban, immigrant identities as contradictory, fractured, and unresolved.

April 8, 2010

Roehrig honored as outstanding faculty member by the Council of Graduate Students

Gillian Roehrig, associate professor of science education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, is one of 12 faculty members across the University selected by the Council of Graduate Students as outstanding faculty who go above and beyond expectations to ensure the success of graduate students, both as students and as the next generation of scholars and researchers. Roehrig and the other 11 faculty selected to receive this award were chosen from among 60 faculty nominated by graduate students for consideration for this award.

Each faculty nominee was nominated by a minimum of two graduate students. This is the first year that the Council of Graduate Students has provided this award. Recipients of the award will be recognized at a reception on April 19.

April 6, 2010

Alumnus Mark Vagle recognized for excellence in teaching

Alumnus Mark D. Vagle (Ph.D., curriculum and instruction, 2006), now assistant professor of elementary and social studies education at the University of Georgia, will be recognized at the University of Georgia's Honors Day program on Wednesday, April 7 for his excellence in teaching. Read the full story.

Vagle was a graduate student at the University of Minnesota in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction from 2002 to 2006 and held positions as middle school coordinator and research associate.

C&I Diversity Dialogues: Bryan Davis

"How do White High School Administrators Make Meaning of their Whiteness?"

Davis discusses how white high school administrators make meaning of their whiteness through interactions with students of color and staff of color; offers examples of racism disguised as school spirit, well intended promotions invalidating race as an issue in school, and honest conversations about race with high school students. Also: descriptions of white administrators personal and professional racial examples of confusion, perceived arrival, embarrassment, guilt and discovery.
-
Bryan Davis is a PhD candidate, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and assistant principal for a large high school in Green Bay Wisconsin.
-----------
Tuesday 4/13/2010
12:00 p.m. - 1 p.m.
40 Peik Hall
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Diversity Dialogues: monthly gatherings sponsored by the Department of Curriculum & Instruction. Each features a presentation by faculty, staff, student, or community members. Time is allotted for conversation.

April 4, 2010

C&I student research poster sessions on Friday, April 9, 2010

Graduate student research conducted in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction will be highlighted in poster sessions in 28 Peik Hall and several adjoining rooms from 1:00 and 4:00 PM on Friday, April 9. Each student presenter will have space allocated to exhibit their research and participate in discussions with faculty and student attendees. (View list of presenters.)
Midway through the event, from approximately 2:30-3:00 PM, awards will be presented to a graduate student who has done outstanding research in the area of diversity and a graduate student who has done exceptional work as a supervisor.

The event is free and open to all interested faculty and students. Refreshments will be provided.

Art education student receives 2010 Bush Leadership Fellowship

Judi Petkau Judi Petkau, Ph.D. student in art education (Curriculum and Instruction), and educator at the Weisman Art Museum, has been awarded a Bush Foundation Leadership Fellowship to support her research in art museum-based learning for the upcoming academic year. The fellowship includes an opportunity to work with leading museum education researchers at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, focusing on the recently opened Sackler Centre for Education and the institution's creativity and diversity initiatives. Petkau plans to complete her thesis research during the fellowship year and return to help reopen the expanded Weisman Art Museum in the fall of 2011.

"Materialities and Imaginaries of the Mobile Internet" conference is funded

Thomas SwissThomas Swiss, professor of culture and teaching in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, is co-PI on a project funded by The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Among other activities, Swiss, along with two sociologists from Laurier and York Colleges in Canada, will be co-organizing an international conference on "Materialities and Imaginaries of the Mobile Internet" to be held in Waterloo, Ontario, next November.

March 30, 2010

Roger T. Johnson honored as 2010 AERA Fellow

Professor Roger T. Johnson (Curriculum and Instruction) has been named a 2010 Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. His nomination was advanced to the Fellows Committee by his peers and colleagues in the field in recognition of his exceptional scientific or scholarly contributions to education research or significant contributions to the field through the development of research opportunities and settings. He is one of 67 Fellows who will be inducted on Saturday, May 1, 2010, during AERA's 91st Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado. Fellows serve as models and mentors to the next generation of scholars of educational research. Johnson's research has focused on the development and dissemination of cooperative learning techniques for the classroom.

March 26, 2010

Joshua Ellis is awarded an Alumni Society Advanced Study Student Scholarship

Joshua Ellis, a student in the Science education M.Ed. initial licensure program, Department of Curriculum and Instruction) has been chosen by the College of Education and Human Development Alumni Society as one of four winners of the Advanced Study Student Scholarship. The Society's criteria for granting this award are academic performance and potential for making a significant contribution to the field of education and human development. Joshua's selection as a recipient denotes excellence in both areas. The college will honor Joshua and other scholarship recipients at the Celebration of Scholars in October.

March 23, 2010

College readiness grant helps teachers deliver dual language immersion program

Associate Professor Diane Tedick (second languages and cultures education, Curriculum and Instruction) was awarded a "Ramp-Up to Readiness" grant, to be funded through the University's College Readiness Consortium. The grant project, titled "Sheltered Instruction and Language/Literacy Development Strategies for Middle School Teachers Serving Diverse Learners," will support professional development for Minneapolis Public Schools (MPS) teachers, who will be teaching in the newly designed joint Dual Immersion and International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme housed at Anwatin Middle School. Tedick has been working with MPS since November to design the new program, which will serve native Spanish-speaking Latino learners and a highly diverse group of native English-speaking students.

Tedick reviews post-secondary Hawaiian language immersion programs

Diane Tedick (associate professor, second languages and cultures education, Curriculum and Instruction) has just returned from a week at the University of Hawaii-Hilo (UH-H) where she served an external reviewer of two post-secondary Hawaiian immersion programs within the College of Hawaiian Language. UH-H educators have worked over 30 years on efforts to revitalize the endangered Hawaiian language and culture through immersion education. Theirs is the first post-secondary indigenous immersion effort in the US. It is now possible for students to complete a majority of their education from preschool through the doctoral level in Hawaiian.

March 22, 2010

Kari Smalkoski named Hmong Studies Fellow, 2010-11


The Program in Asian American Studies and the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Minnesota are hosting Kari Smalkoski as a graduate fellow in Hmong Studies, generously funded by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation.

Smalkoski is a Ph.D. student in Culture and Teaching in the department of Curriculum and Instruction. Read her profile on the Institute for Advanced Studies site. A post-doctoral position in Hmong studies is also being hosted.

March 16, 2010

Reaching the iParent

Susan WalkerAssociate Professor Susan Walker (family, youth, and community education, Curriculum and Instruction) gave the keynote presentation to the Northwest Regional Parent Educators conference, in Vancouver, WA, on Tuesday, March 14. The topic was "Reaching the iParent: The changing world of technology and parent education."

March 12, 2010

Qik to Pang: 'Earthducation' begins Arctic expedition

Charles Miller Aaron DoeringAssociate Professor Aaron Doering and Assistant Professor Charles Miller of learning technologies (Curriculum and Instruction), are launching a new education endeavor called Earthducation with a trip from Qikiqtarjuaq to Pangnirtung in the Canadian Arctic.

Earthducation explores the primary questions "What is education?" and "Can education advance sustainability?" through travels across the seven continents (2010-2014). Supported by the Institute on the Environment, Doering and Miller leave for their first trip, Expedition 0: Qik to Pang, the week of March 14, 2010.

Follow their travels: http://www.earthducation.com/

March 11, 2010

"Inquiry to Impact" symposia bring together youth workers, youth leaders, and researchers

SteinJ-10.jpgThe Inquiry to Impact Symposia offered by University of Minnesota Extension Center for Youth Development features free, public symposia to bring together youth workers, youth leaders, researchers, and policy makers to discuss issues in the field of youth development.Youth development leadership (YDL) M.Ed. program coordinator Jerry Stein said YDL students and faculty attend symposia sessions and promote the YDL program through their participation. Individuals interested in healthy youth development are welcome to attend upcoming presentations. Additional information and registration is available for sessions at the links below.

March 18th: "The Means to Grow Up: Reinventing Apprenticeship as a Developmental Support in Adolescence." Dr. Robert Halpern, President, Erikson Institute, Chicago.

April 29th: "In Pursuit of Effective Best Practices for Out of School Time."
Dr. Robert Granger, President, W.T Grant Foundation.

Graduate student Brant Miller joins GoNorth! Greenland 2010

MillerB-10.jpgBrant Miller, Ph.D. candidate in science education (Curriculm and Instruction), will be joining the GoNorth! Greenland 2010 team in April. Along with learning technologies associate professor Aaron Doering and the GoNorth! Adventure Learning team, Brant is preparing to explore Greenland with K-12 classrooms around the world. Brant will be responsible for scientific and traditional ecological knowledge research duties, along with supporting the education and expedition activities throughout the adventure. For more information visit polarhusky.com and learn more about team member Brant Miller.

"Discover YDL" video promotes youth development leadership master's program

SteinJ-10.jpgLearn about the M.Ed. in youth development leadership by viewing a new four-minute video, "Discovering YDL." The video features youth development leadership students and faculty who highlight features of the YDL master's of education program and the types of positions in which graduates of the program are employed. The program provides educators with an informed understanding of practices, policies, and ethics of youth development work and prepares them to contribute to the healthy development of young people in traditional and nontraditional settings. YDL faculty member and program coordinator Jerry Stein summed up the program as a "scholarly complex approach to ideas with give and take, experiential learning, and a lot of fun. It's a great way to go to graduate school."


March 9, 2010

Go North! Greenland adventure featured on Kare 11

Aaron DoeringKare 11 Sunrise highlighted Aaron Doering and the Go North! Adventure Learning program as they prepare to explore Greenland with K-12 classrooms around the world. From now through May, students and their teachers will have the opportunity to follow Doering, Bonnie Westby Huebner Endowed Chair in Education and Technology, and his team via the Go North! Web site with a prepared curriculum as they experience the climate, culture, and terrain of Greenland. View the KARE 11 News video below.

February 13, 2010

Event taps education leaders' expertise on teacher quality

On Feb. 5, more than 200 of Minnesota's top education leaders and policymakers met at the University of Minnesota to discuss how to develop, measure, and support teacher effectiveness and quality. Hosted by the University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development and moderated by Karen Seashore, the Robert H. Beck Professor of Ideas in Education, a panel of state and national experts shared perspectives from across the spectrum of the education industry. Panel members included Misty Sato, who holds the new Carmen Starkson Campbell Endowed Chair in Education; Bush Foundation President Peter Hutchinson; St. Paul Public Schools Superintendent Valeria Silva, Teach for America President Matthew Kramer; and Garnet Franklin, education issues specialist for Education Minnesota.

Sato focused on the teaching profession as a cycle, from recruitment and preparation, early career support and ongoing professional development. The ultimate goal, she said, is for the most effective, experienced teachers to become master teachers who can help those who are new to the profession.

Sato also highlighted a number of teacher effectiveness initiatives nationwide, including two at the college. The Teacher Support Partnership--a collaboration between CEHD, the Minnesota Department of Education, Education Minnesota, and the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities--has developed guidelines for supporting early career teachers. The college's Teacher Education Redesign Initiative (TERI) is building partnerships with the schools where graduates of the teacher preparation program will teach. As part of TERI, the college is also the lead institution among state teacher preparation programs working with the Minnesota Department of Education on a national pilot assessment for pre-service teachers.

The panel members followed with their perspectives on teacher quality, based in their individual experiences in education. Hutchinson reiterated the call for ongoing partnerships between pre-K-12 schools and districts and colleges of education. The foundation has funded TERI with a $4.5 million grant--part of a $40 million overall investment in seven regional higher education partners over the next 10 years.

Panelists also addressed a number of issues posed by Seashore related to attracting and retaining high quality teachers and specific policy recommendations to meet those challenges. Though some disagreed on controversial topics such as tenure and alternative teacher preparation, they all expressed their commitment and urgency towards solving the complex challenges of an educational system that does not work for all students. They also repeated the vitality of cooperation across higher education, pre-K-12 and state systems.

Read the media release about the event. A complete synopsis and video recording of the event are posted on the event Web site.

February 9, 2010

Avery reappointed editor of top-ranked social studies journal

Pat AveryPat Avery (professor, social studies education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction) has been appointed to another three-year term as editor of the top-ranked journal in social studies education, Theory and Research in Social Education.

Gentzler's tips help parents find schools that fit

Yvonne GentzlerYvonne Gentzler (associate professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, family, youth, and community education) provided tips for parents choosing a child's school for fall. Gentzler offers parents a list of questions to consider when determining if a school is a good fit for a child in an article by Julie Pfitzinger, "Shopping for a School," published February 7, 2010, in the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

February 4, 2010

Mistilina Sato named to Campbell Endowed Chair in Education

Mistilina SatoMistilina Sato has been named the inaugural holder of the Carmen Starkson Campbell Endowed Chair in Education in the College of Education and Human Development. One of few such chairs in the country, the Campbell Chair focuses on scholarly activities that prepare and support new teachers and improve effectiveness and retention of teachers, especially as advocates for at-risk students. The chair also encourages partnerships with schools and districts, with emphasis on those facing significant challenges in achieving student success.

Carmen and Jim Campbell established the Campbell Chair and an accompanying graduate fellowship in honor of Carmen's own experiences as a teacher for 11 years in the Minneapolis Public Schools and her concern and caring for K-12 teachers and the profession. Carmen earned a B.S. degree from the college in 1964, and Jim holds a B.S. degree from the Carlson School of Management. Jim retired as chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo Bank Minnesota after a 38-year banking career.

Sato, assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, is co-principal investigator and director of the college's Teacher Education Redesign Initiative (TERI). "As the Campbell Chair holder, Sato will continue her outstanding leadership in reaching TERI's goal of transforming teacher education," said the college's dean Jean Quam. "As a former teacher and an expert on teacher quality and development, she is uniquely qualified to carry forward the vision of the Campbell Chair."

Sato holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University in curriculum and teacher education, with a specialty in science education, and a B.A. degree from Princeton University in geological sciences. While at Stanford, she developed and directed a regional professional development program for practicing teachers pursuing National Board Certification in the San Francisco Bay area. She began her teaching career as a middle school teacher in Plainsboro, N.J., and as an instructional team leader with the Merck Institute for Science Education in Rahway, N.J., in the earth and space sciences.

Sato's research focuses on teacher development and the use of formative assessment in science classrooms. She is completing a study of cultural relevance in science pedagogy (CRISP) through a Minnesota teacher action research network and the Science Museum of Minnesota. As a Knowles Science Teaching Foundation Research Fellow, she is working with a Twin Cities high school science teacher action research group on enacting formative assessment in their everyday practice.

Sato has been awarded the 2008 Young Scholars Research Fellowship, the Women's Philanthropic Leadership Rising Star Award, and the 2007 Kappa Delta Pi Early Research Award.

DigMe digital media program featured on Kare 11's "Cool in School"

Cynthia LewisThe DigMe program, a partnership between the University of Minnesota and Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis, was featured in the February 4th news on Kare 11, "Cool in School: Roosevelt High School's Digital Media studies." Reporter Kim Insley visited the media studies classroom of English teacher Molly McCarthy, a 2009 graduate of the CEHD initial licensure program in English Education, to film students receiving peer feedback on digital projects that culminated a unit on food and globalization. McCarthy and Cynthia Lewis, (professor, literacy and English education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction) were interviewed for the video segment below.

DigMe is an interdisciplinary program focusing on the innovative use of emerging technologies to enhance student learning. Cynthia Lewis and Cassie Scharber (assistant professor, learning technologies, Department of Curriculum and Instruction) lead the partnership with Roosevelt High School and are conducting research on engagement in learning as shaped by a Web 2.0 project-based curriculum.

February 2, 2010

Doering on panel to discuss technology integration in higher education

Aaron DoeringAaron Doering (associate professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, learning technologies), Ann Duin, Merrie Kaas, and Billie Wahlstrom with moderator Debra Olson responded to the February 1, 2010 keynote address by Curtis Bonk, "Active Learning with Technology: Myths, Magic, and Mucho Motivation," which explored the application, benefits, and challenges of e-learning. Bonk is a well-known authority on emerging technologies for learning, professor of instructional systems technology at Indiana University and author. The presentation was the first in a series of presentations in the Academic Health Center's Teaching and Learning Series. View image of presenter and panelists.

Doering holds the Bonnie Westby Huebner Endowed Chair in Education and Technology in the College of Education and Human Development.

CNBC interviews Miller about new "app" class

Charles MillerCharles Miller (assistant professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, learning technologies) was interviewed by by CNBC's technology reporter Jim Goldman, and featured in a February 1, 2010 news story titled "Apple 101: The App Class." Miller described what students will learn in the class offered this fall and the educational experiences and learning that new technology applications may bring.

VideoAnt showcased by Tech Trends

Brad HosackBrad Hosack (student in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction's learning technologies Ph.D. track, and an interaction designer in CEHD's Academic Technology Services) will be featured in the "ID Portfolio" of Tech Trends (volume 54 issue 3) for his design and research work on VideoAnt, a tool that allows users to provide text annotation at precise points in video. Brad's work was featured in the 2008 Outstanding Achievement in Innovative Instructional Design Showcase at the AECT conference in Orlando, Florida. Tech Trends is the leading journal of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology.

January 30, 2010

Miller featured on KARE 11 news for new "app" class

Charles MillerAssistant professor Charles Miller (Department of Curriculum and Instruction, learning technologies) was interviewed by reporter Jana Shortal and featured January 28 on the 5:00 P.M. KARE 11 news [video]. The news story focused on a new course to be offered by Miller in the fall that will teach students to design new programs called "apps" for smart electronic devices. Students will be able to design apps as "education tools, games, or any other void the app world has yet to see filled."

January 21, 2010

Literacy researchers' proposal wins National Reading Conference award

Cassandra ScharberDavid O'BrienDeborah Dillon

Area Chairs of the National Reading Conference selected a proposal by literacy researchers Deborah Dillon, David O'Brien, Cassandra Scharber (faculty), and Brad Biggs, Catherine Kelly, and Megan Mahowald (graduate students/instructors) in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction as an award winner for the 2009 annual program in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The award recognizes the quality and importance of the research team's work. Reviewers gave it uniformly high ratings for having a well developed and highly refined proposal on an important topic in literacy research.

January 13, 2010

Elementary education faculty announce fall 2010 fellowship applications for graduate students

Kathleen CramerKathleen Cramer, associate professor of mathematics education and elementary education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, announced the availability of three elementary education fellowships for graduate students with elementary education experience or interest. Applications are due by March 12, 2010 for fall awards.

Interested students will find award details of eligibility criteria, deadlines, and application procedures in the following documents.

Joanne Buggey Endowed Fellowship in Elementary Education ($3,000 award)
Mithun Graduate Fellowship ($5,000 award)
Priscilla Hawn Endowed Fellowship Fund ($3000 award)

January 3, 2010

Ph.D. students Miller and Kelly receive Thesis Research Grants

Brant Miller and Kate Kelly, doctoral students in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, have each been awarded Thesis Research Grant funds by the Graduate School. Grant funds help students cover expenses associated with their thesis research, such as domestic travel, fieldwork, postage, and photocopying.

Miller's research (Gillian Roehrig, adviser) involves looking at the development of science agency in American Indian middle school students as a result of experiencing a culturally relevant science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) curriculum.

Kelly's research (Deborah Dillon, adviser) involves documenting the knowledge, beliefs, and teaching practices of preservice, first-, and third-year reading teachers prepared at the same institution working in urban, suburban, and rural schools in Minnesota.

Applications for the next round of domestic and international thesis research grants are due to the Graduate School by March 1, 2010.

December 15, 2009

Ngo and Leet-Otley presented at International Conference on Teacher Education & Social Justice

Bic NgoBic Ngo, assistant professor, and doctoral student Jill Leet-Otley, both representing contexts of teaching and learning in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, presented at the 6th International Conference on Teacher Education & Social Justice. The conference took place at the University of Illinois-Chicago on December 5th and 6th, 2009. Their presentation was entitled, Is There a Hmong Gender "Norm"?: Perspectives of Hmong American Policymakers on Gender, Early Marriage and Education.

Taylor receives 2009 literacy research award

Barbara TaylorProfessor Barbara Taylor (Guy Bond Professor of Reading, Department of Curriculum and Instruction) was awarded NRC/LRA's top research honor—the 2009 Oscar Causey Award. This award is bestowed on an individual who has published substantial, significant, and original, research in literacy, has generated new knowledge through literacy research, and is recognized as a leader in the conduct and promotion of literacy research. Dr. Taylor will give a keynote address at the 2010 NRC/LRA Conference.

Beach nominated president of national reading-literacy organization

Richard BeachThe National Reading Conference (NRC)—soon to be renamed the Literacy Research Association(LRA)—is a premier international reading-literacy research organization. Members engage in research and dialogue around literacy and related topics and support the professional development of emerging and established scholars. Literacy professor Richard Beach (Department of Curriculum and Instruction) has been nominated to run for the presidency of the NRC/LRA.

December 9, 2009

Sato received National Staff Development Council's 2009 "Best Research Award"

Mistilina SatoAssociate professor Misty Sato (teacher development and science education, Department of Curriculum and Instruction) was recently awarded the National Staff Development Council's 2009 "Best Research Award" at their annual national meeting. The award recognizes research that demonstrates the impact of staff development on student performance and contributes to the knowledge base of the field. Misty, with co-authors Ruth Chung Wei and Linda Darling-Hammond, studied the impact of the National Board Certification process on mathematics and science teachers' classroom assessment practices over a four year period. The article on which the award is based is:

Sato, M., Wei, R. C., & Darling-Hammond, L. (2008). Improving teachers' assessment practices through professional development: The case of National Board Certification. American Educational Research Journal, 45(3), 669-700.

December 8, 2009

University of Minnesota's GoNorth! travels with delegation of students from arctic countries to United Nations Climate Change conference in Copenhagen

Aaron DoeringAaron Doering, associate professor in Learning Technologies (Curriculum and Instruction) and program director Mille Porsild, both part of the GoNorth! adventure learning series, will travel with a group of 20 teachers and students from the United States, Canada, Norway and Greenland to next weeks 15th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP15) in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Read the full story at UMNews


December 4, 2009

Swiss presents new media poetry

Thomas SwissThomas Swiss, a professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Culture and Teaching track, presented his new media poetry and gave a talk about his work on December 2 in a program sponsored by mnartists.org.

Photo from presentation.

Swiss will be teaching a graduate course this spring for students interested in teaching poetry and creative writing.

December 3, 2009

What Happens When 4,000+ Classrooms in 30 Countries Explore the Arctic Together?: Environmental Stewardship

Aaron DoeringAaron Doering, associate professor in learning technologies, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, gave a presentation to the public December 2 on "What Happens When 4,000+ Classrooms in 30 Countries Explore the Arctic Together?: Environmental Stewardship" as part of the Frontiers in the Environment Lecture Series sponsored by the Institute on the Environment.

View the presentation online.

Bush Foundation commits $4.5M for TERI

The Bush Foundation has committed up to $4.5 million to support the University of Minnesota as it restructures teacher preparation programs in the College of Education and Human Development. The Bush Foundation today announced a total of seven partnerships, which include 14 higher-education institutions, focused on transforming teacher-preparation programs in Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota.

Through ongoing collaboration with K-12 schools, the college's Teacher Education Redesign Initiative (TERI) will have a long-lasting, positive impact on the children of Minnesota, new teachers and programs within the college. Improved partnerships with K-12 districts are designed to benefit the university, district and prospective teachers.

Teachers prepared through TERI will strongly focus on student learning and have the ability to adapt to the needs of all learners. The university will diversify its teaching candidate pool and provide pathways into its teacher preparation programs for both exceptionally qualified undergraduate students and for career changers.

The first group of prospective teachers will enter the redesigned program during summer 2011.

Read the press release

December 1, 2009

Doering's GoNorth! project funded for fifth year

Aaron DoeringAaron Doering, associate professor in Learning Technologies (Curriculum and Instruction), received funding from the Best Buy Children's Foundation for the upcoming GoNorth! Greenland 2010 Adventure Learning project. This is the fifth year of funding from Best Buy and the last year of the GoNorth! Adventure Learning Series. GoNorth! is noted as the first online education program to educate students on climate change and sustainable development that represented regions from all of the circumpolar Arctic. More info can be found at http://www.polarhusky.com.

November 30, 2009

Doering and Miller deliver an educational technology workshop in South Africa

Charles Miller Aaron DoeringAaron Doering and Charles Miller, associate and assistant professors in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, led a three-day educational technology workshop entitled "Transforming the Perspective" to faculty at North-Western University in Potchesfstroom, South Africa. The workshop presented opportunities for transformation in the many ways technology is used in education ranging from adventure learning and technological pedagogical content knowledge to contemporary role-based frameworks. This workshop is one of a series Doering and Miller have presented across the globe. View image of Miller and Doering with workshop participants.

November 23, 2009

C&I faculty and students well represented at National Council for the Social Studies

J.B. Mayo Patricia Avery
Social studies education doctoral students Sara Levy, Maia Sheppard, Annette Simmons and Muffet Trout, and faculty members Patricia Avery, professor, and J.B. Mayo, assistant professor, Department of Curriculum and Instruction, presented individual research papers at the annual College and University Faculty Assembly of the National Council for the Social Studies in Atlanta, Georgia November 11-12.

The students' research papers are entitled: Teacher Educators and the Minimization of Trauma (Levy); Difficult History: "I Just Want to ... Feel the Pain of How They Were Treated" (Sheppard); Hmong Adolescents' Conceptions of Citizenship (Simmons); Care Before Judgment: Relationship Building to Keep Learning Alive in Social Studies Student Teaching Supervision (Trout). Social studies education faculty

Titles of faculty papers are: The Deliberating in a Democracy Project: Experiences in Transitional Democracies (Avery) and Queer, Questioning, Ally, and Gay?: GSA Members' Multiple and Shifting Identities and their Impact on the Overall School Community (Mayo).

November 13, 2009

AERA accepts Hoyt, Trout, Engebretson, and Martel's symposium proposal

Mistilina SatoCurriculum and Instruction graduate students Danny Hoyt, Muffet Trout, Kathryn Engebretson, and Jason Martel received news that their American Education Research Association (AERA) symposium proposal, organized by Misty Sato, an associate professor in the department, was accepted to the Self-Study SIG. They will present their self-studies in teacher education which focus on the process of becoming, the role of ethical care, identity and ethos development, and the role of subject matter discipline. Discussant Todd Dinkleman will critique and compare the findings with a university-based model of student teacher supervision preparation that uses a collaborative inquiry approach.

November 10, 2009

Diversity Dialogues hosts Tim Lensmire 11/24: White Men's Racial Others

Timothy Lensmire

Diversity Dialogues hosts Tim Lensmire, associate professor in Curriculum and Instruction.

Tuesday 11/24/2009
12:00 p.m. - 1 p.m.
40 Peik Hall
Please bring a bag lunch if you like!

White Americans have, from the first, hopelessly confused the real Negroes and Indians, with whom they must for the sake of social survival and civil peace learn to live, with certain projections of their own deepest minds, aspects of their own psychic life with which precisely they find it impossible to live. —Leslie Fiedler

For the four white men who are the focus of this talk, the production of their own racial identities was intimately tied up with their relations to real and imagined racial others. I first share a theoretical framework that illuminates just how important racial others have been for the meaning- and self-making of white people throughout US history. Then, I discuss the larger interview study in which the four men participated, before turning to my interpretation of their interviews with me.

In the lives of these men, people of color, real and imagined, divided factions of families and churches against one another. People of color were integral to moral lessons they learned as boys—positive lessons about fairness and respect in athletics, negative lessons about hypocrisy (as they listened to their elders accuse Indians of drunkenness and stealing even as they watched these same white elders drink and steal). These men used people of color, imagined and real, to understand themselves and their powers—how smart they were, how good, how tough. People of color were integral to their efforts to find a place among the racist and democratic meanings and values of their community, society, and world.

Diversity Dialogues: monthly gatherings sponsored by the Department of Curriculum & Instruction. Each features a presentation by faculty, staff, student, or community members. Time is allotted for conversation.

Bigelow, Tarone, and Hansen present keynote on second language acquisition at MinneTESOL conference

Kit Hansen, Martha Bigelow, and Elaine TaroneThis past weekend Martha Bigelow, associate professor of second languages and cultures education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, together with Elaine Tarone, professor and director of CARLA (Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition), and Kit Hansen, lecturer in Writing Studies, gave a keynote address at the MinneTESOL conference about their research with Somali teens on second language acquisition.

Ph.D. candidate Jill Watson selected by MDE for expertise in initial literacy development

Jill WatsonJill Watson, a doctoral candidate in second languages and cultures education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, has been selected as an expert consultant to the Aligned Literacy Project sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Education (MDE). Her area of expertise is initial literacy development by English language learners with limited formal schooling. Expert consultants to the project will work to align literacy instruction practices in the state, and will produce 4 webinars to serve as platforms for professional development and school literacy instruction design.

November 9, 2009

King to deliver keynote address in Brasil

Kendall KingAssociate Professor Kendall King (Curriculum and Instruction, Second Languages and Cultures Education) is traveling to Brasilia, Brasil in November to deliver a keynote address for the Brazilian Association of Applied Linguistics. Her topic is language policy and language teaching for a plural and just society.

Doering delivers keynote address in China

Aaron DoeringLast week, Associate Professor Aaron Doering (Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Learning Technologies) delivered a keynote address at the International Forum on 21st Century Learning in Hangzhou, China.

November 5, 2009

Miller receives best paper award at international AACE E-Learn conference

Charles MillerAssistant Professor Charles Miller (Department of Curriculum and Instruction, Learning Technologies) was awarded Best Paper at the 2009 AACE E-Learn international conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, on October 28 for his research titled "Role-Based Design: Rethinking Creativity and Innovation in Instructional Design." Along with presenting an improvement to current practice in the field, the goal of the paper and presentation was to stimulate discussion about the contemporary role of designers and the nature of the instructional design process. Dr. Miller's co-authors included Brad Hokanson (University of Minnesota School of Design) and Simon Hooper (Penn State Instructional Systems).

October 26, 2009

Learning technologies faculty and students present at e-learning conference

e-Learn.jpgThe Learning Technologies program in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction is well represented at the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education's World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education in Vancouver, Canada, October 26-30, 2009. LT faculty members Aaron Doering, Charles Miller, Cassandra Scharber, and LT students attending the conference are involved in six faculty presentations and six student presentations.

October 22, 2009

Learning technologies sponsored (re)desine event

(re)desine learning technologies students and faculty

Over 45 people from multiple educational and industry backgrounds gathered at Tony's Diner in Dinkytown Monday evening for (re)desine, an informal event sponsored by Curriculum and Instruction's learning technologies faculty and students.

This (re)desine event featured LT students presenting their work for upcoming international conference presentations. Check out pictures from the event as well as (re)desine's website for future events! Everyone is welcome!

October 21, 2009

CEHD alum wins Milken award

Martha Spriggs (M.Ed. '03), a math teacher at Andersen United Community School, Minneapolis, is the latest college alum to win the prestigious Milken National Educator Award.

Among her achievements, Spriggs was recognized for outstanding results in the classroom, where 82 percent of her eighth-grade students reach state target scores, and for establishing an after-school science program for girls.

The Milken Family Foundation National Educator Awards were established in 1987 by Lowell Milken to recognize the importance of outstanding educators and encourage talented young people to enter the teaching profession.

Read the complete Minnesota Public Radio story on Spriggs's award or read the Minnesota Department of Education release.

October 16, 2009

GeoThentic: Designing and Assessing with Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

Charles MillerCassandra ScharberAaron Doering


Learning Technologies faculty Aaron Doering, Cassandra Scharber and Charles Miller, along with former LT student George Veletsianos, Ph.D., University of Manchester, UK, have recently published an article on GeoThentic, their most recently developed online K12 teaching and learning environment.

Doering, A., Scharber, C., Miller, C., & Veletsianos, G. (2009). GeoThentic: Designing and assessing with Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education [Online serial], 9(3).

Abstract: GeoThentic, an online teaching and learning environment, focuses on engaging teachers and learners in solving real-world geography problems through use of geospatial technologies. The design of GeoThentic is grounded on the technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge (TPACK) framework as a metacognitive tool. This paper describes how the TPACK framework has informed the authors' design endeavors and how a set of assessment models within GeoThentic can be used to assess teachers' TPACK.

October 9, 2009

Diversity Dialogue 10/29: Tom DiMaria of Creative Growth Studios

Tom DiMaria


Curriculum and Instruction
is pleased to host Tom DiMaria, executive director of Creative Growth Studios in Oakland, California, at October's Diversity Dialogue event on Thursday, October 29.

Time: 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Location: 325 Education Sciences Building

October 6, 2009

Conference Call for Papers: The Ethics and Politics of Research with Immigrant Populations

Martha BigelowBic Ngo

The Ethics and Politics of Research with Immigrant Populations
President's Interdisciplinary Conference
June 4-5, 2010
University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Conference chairs Assistant Professor Bic Ngo (Curriculum and Instruction), Associate Professor Martha Bigelow, (Curriculum and Instruction) and Professor Stacey Lee, Department of Educational Policy Studies, University of Wisconsin, Madison, announce the conference and extend a call for papers. Submission deadline: December 21, 2009.

Details are available at the conference Web site.

Download conference call for papers [pdf] and conference flier [pdf]

September 24, 2009

Celebrate Book Week with 2009 Caldecott Award Author Susan Marie Swanson

Susan Marie Swanson
Celebrate Book Week 2009 with Susan Marie Swanson, the author of The House In The Night, The 2009 Caldecott Award Book.

Book Week activities take place October 13 - 15, 2009

Book display, Andersen Library Atrium [map]
noon to 6:15 p.m., Tuesday, October 13
10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesday, October 14
10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Thursday, October 15

Review of new books, Willey Hall Auditorium [map]
4 - 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, October 13
Appetizers* from 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.

Evening lecture,* Willey Hall Auditorium [map]
6:30 p.m., Tuesday, October 13

* $15 charge for appetizers and/or lecture
Please send checks made out to the University of Minnesota to Cathy Zemke, Peik Hall, 159 Pillsbury Drive S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455.

Swiss book on New Media from MIT Press

New Media Poetics

A new edition of New Media Poetics: Contexts, Technotexts, and Theories, co-edited by Professor Thomas Swiss, (Curriculum and Instruction, Culture and Teaching), has just been published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Press. By adding new media poetry to the study of hypertext narrative, interactive fiction, computer games, and other digital art forms,New Media Poetics extends our understanding of the computer as an expressive medium, showcases works that are visually arresting, aurally charged, and dynamic, and traces the lineage of new media poetry through print and sound poetics, procedural writing, gestural abstraction and conceptual art, and activist communities formed by emergent poetics.

September 8, 2009

Knoll Area Lockers Now Available for Rent

Locker imageKnoll area lockers are now available for students to rent for a semester, academic year, or calendar year. Lockers are located in Peik Hall. The locker rental contract form [pdf] should be completed and returned to 125 Peik Hall along with payment for the rental term.

September 5, 2009

Diversity Dialogue 9/29: Race, Media, and Emotion in an Urban Classroom

Cynthia Lewis

Drawing on data from their year-long ethnographic study, Professor Cynthia Lewis, Ph.D. (Curriculum and Instruction) and Jessica Dockter explore the social politics of emotion in a diverse high school classroom where students analyzed and discussed racial representations in the media. The talk focuses on classroom discourse, students' perceptions, and students' media productions to show how emotion functioned to position students as critically engaged learners.
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Tuesday 9/29/2009
12:00 p.m. - 1 p.m.
40 Peik Hall
Please bring a bag lunch if you like!
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Diversity Dialogues are monthly gatherings sponsored by the Department of Curriculum & Instruction. Each features a presentation by faculty, staff, student, or community members. Time is allotted for conversation.

September 4, 2009

Gentzler Helps Goldy Gopher Develop Skills for College Life

Yvonne GentzlerAssociate professor Yvonne Gentzler, Ph.D., (Curriculum and Instruction) helps Goldy Gopher learn to do laundry and manage his time. See Goldy learn new skills in the videos at the links below.

Goldy's laundry dilemma Goldy Gopher suffers from a lack of laundry knowledge. Can he wash maroon and gold together? Will a Badger shirt ruin his other clothing? Good thing U of MN Family Education Professor Yvonne Gentzler is there to lend a helping hand! Take a look ...you might even pick up a few tips yourself!

Goldy learns time management skills Poor Goldy Gopher ...so much to do and so little time to do it! There are football games at the new TCF Bank Stadium, classes to attend, events with alumni ...he's one busy rodent! Fortunately for Goldy, U of MN Family Education Professor Yvonne Gentzler knows a thing or two about how college students can better manage their time as they head back to school.

August 29, 2009

NBFYR Book Review: T-Minus: The Race to the Moon

Book cover for T-Minus: The Race to the MoonRebecca Rapport, Ph.D. (Curriculum and Instruction), editor of the journal New Books for Young Readers, shares a review of T-Minus: The Race to the Moon by Jim Ottaviani, Kevin Cannon (Illustrator), Zander Cannon (Illustrator) (Aladdin. 2009. 124 pages. $12.99. Informational Science. Intermediate/Adolescent. Multicultural. 1416949607).

Readers interested in the Cold War history of the space race between the Russians and the Americans will be fascinated by this fictionalized, historical graphic novel about all the people involved in the herculean effort to land a man on the moon. The use of the T-Minus countdown device, beginning in 1957 with "T-MINUS 12 YEARS" and ending with "T-PLUS..." after the Apollo 11 mission, is quite effective in giving readers a sense of how much time passes between dramatic events.

The side columns listing failure after failure of both countries, and the deaths of some astronauts due to these unsuccessful missions and tests, reinforce the danger and the determination of those involved. The behind-the-scenes look at all the arguments over the decisions that are made also highlights the respect the scientists on both sides had for each other. The Soviet and American missions presented make this an intriguing and balanced look at what happened when President Kennedy declared that the U.S. would have a man on the moon within the decade. A glossary on the front and back covers is quite helpful; a page entitled "Did All of This Really Happen?" includes added information and resources for those readers who need to know more.

Looking for a book for a young reader? See a list of current books or do an advanced search. See also Book Week, October 13-15, 2009.

August 28, 2009

Swiss Publication Well Received

Thom SwissCurriculum and Instruction Professor Thomas Swiss's new book, Highway 61 Revisited: Bob Dylan's Road from Minnesota to the World, co-edited by Colleen Sheehy, former head of education at the Weisman Museum, has been published by the University of Minnesota Press and has received strong reviews in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Swiss and Sheehy bring together the most eminent Dylan scholars at work today--as well as people from such far-reaching fields as labor history, African American studies, and Japanese studies--to assess Dylan's career, influences, and his global impact on music and culture.

A few of the venues where Highway 61 Revisited has been reviewed and discussed are: Library Journal, Minnesota Public Radio, WNTI Radio, New Jersey, and Mpls.St.Paul Magazine.

August 26, 2009

C&I Alumna Boesser Receives National Teaching Award

Elizabeth BoeserBloomington Jefferson High School teacher Elizabeth Boeser (Curriculum and Instruction, M.Ed. '08) has won the 2009 National Council of Teachers of English High School Teacher of Excellence award for the state of Minnesota for her innovative use of online teaching tools.

See the August 26, 2009 StarTribune.com news story.

August 25, 2009

Publication by Harlan and Ruth Hansen

Ruth and Harlan HansenEmeritus Professor Harlan Hansen (Curriculum and Instruction) and his wife Ruth Hansen (Ph.D. '81, Curriculum and Instruction) have co-authored a book, Lessons for Literacy, Promoting Preschool Success, published by Readleaf Press. The book is an outgrowth of a two year research and development project working with low income preschools in Naples, Florida supported by the Naples Community Foundation and the Naples Alliance for Children. The Hansens also co-authored a Naples Alliance publication, The Discipline Toolbox, which helps preschool teachers deal with 40 common misbehaviors and was provided free to all preschool programs in Collier County. The Hansens also co-chair the Apple Blossom Award for the top five preschool teachers in the county and Ruth is on the final selection committee for the Golden Apple Award which selects the top five K-12 teachers in the county. Harlan is President and both he and Ruth serve on the board of the SW Florida Chapter of the University of Minnesota Alumni Association.

June 22, 2009

Ngo and Bigelow receive president's interdisciplinary conference award

Bic NgoMartha BigelowBic Ngo, Ph.D., assistant professor and Martha Bigelow, Ph.D., associate professor (Curriculum and Instruction) received a President's Interdisciplinary Conference award from the Graduate School to convene a conference in Spring 2010. The conference addresses the question: What are the epistemological and ethical considerations in research with immigrant populations? It will engage university and community colleagues from a variety of disciplines and interests in consideration of ethics and epistemology in research practices and preparation of future researchers. Participants will focus attention on the possibilities and problematics of research with immigrant youth, adults and community members. The conference emphasizes the implications of practices in research design, data collection, analysis and writing of research that involves immigrant populations. These conversations will include concerns related to IRB as well as those that move beyond IRB.

June 16, 2009

Article features teaching via video games by CI student

Brock DubbelsThe Star Tribune featured PhD candidate Brock Dubbels, who uses video games to teach his middle school students at Seward Montessori in Minneapolis. Through Dubbels' Video as Learning Tools class, students create multimedia presentations on how a game is designed and how players might win. In the process, they work on writing, reading comprehension, working cooperatively, and incorporating technology into their studies.

This summer, Dubbels plans to present at the Games in Education Conference in New York and at the Games+Learning+Society Conference in Wisconsin. He is also sharing his approach with other teachers.

Read the full article: Video games: Play and learn
Photo by Bruce Bisping, Star Tribune

Yussen named Educational Research editor; Dillon, Harwell named associate editors

YussenS-2002.jpgFormer CEHD Dean Steve Yussen, professor and director of undergraduate studies in the Institute of Child Development, has been named editor of AERA's flagship journal, Educational Researcher. Deborah Dillon, Guy Bond Chair in Reading in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, and educational psychology professor Michael Harwell join Yussen as associate editors.

Yussen brings more than 35 years of scholarly experience to this new endeavor. In the past he has served as associate editor of Child Development and the Journal of Educational Psychology, as a reviewer for numerous scholarly journals, and as an editorial advisory board member. His own research, which centers on cognitive development, instructional psychology, memory, learning, and reading comprehension in school-age children, has been widely published.

The American Educational Research Association publishes Educational Researcher nine times each year for its members. The peer-reviewed journal features scholarly articles, reviews, analyses, and commentary of importance to the broad community of education researchers.

James Hearn, of the University of Georgia, will join the University of Minnesota faculty as an associate editor.

The full text of AERA's announcement is available here.

June 15, 2009

Greenhow publishes and receives funding

GreenhowC-2007-Pref.jpgPostdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow, Ph.D., (Curriculum and Instruction), has two featured articles in this month's issue of AERA's flagship journal, Educational Researcher, and two articles forthcoming in the Journal of Computer-mediated Communication and the journal of Learning, Media and Technology related to her research on learning with social media:

Greenhow, C. et al. (2009). Web 2.0 and classroom research: What path should we take now? Educational Researcher, 38 (4), 246-259.

Greenhow, C. et al. (2009). Research on Learning and Teaching with Web 2.0: Bridging Conversations. Educational Researcher, 38 (4), 280-283.

She is also the recipient of a second year of funding ($10,000) from the Institute for Advanced Study for the interdisciplinary research consortium she founded in 2007 (www.socialnetresearch.org) and involving faculty in computer science, design, internet studies, new media and education. Greenhow will be a visiting fellow (2009-2010) at Yale University's Information and Society Project focused on digital education and policy, and a participant in the Cyberscholars program with Harvard University's Berkman Center for Internet Studies and MIT's comparative media program, before joining the faculty of Arizona State University.

May 13, 2009

C&I offers new graduate student awards

Curriculum and Instruction has instituted and awarded two new C&I graduate student awards in 2009. The first, an award for Outstanding Graduate Instructor, was awarded to Mary E. Lee-Nichols, a Ph.D. candidate in the Culture and Teaching track (adviser: Tim Lensmire). The second, an award for Outstanding Research Paper, was granted to Pamela Wesely, a student in the Second Languages and Cultures Education track (adviser: Diane Tedick). Dr. Wesely just defended her dissertation and graduated last week.

These two recipients and all the nominees for these awards were honored Saturday, May 9, at C&I's Graduate Studies Open House celebration, an annual gathering to congratulate our M.A. and Ph.D. graduates.

Guzey and Jatau awarded Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships

Please join the Curriculum and Instruction community in congratulating their two Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship recipients. Selcen Guzey (PhD candidate in the science education track, adviser Gill Roehrig) and Phebe Jatau (PhD candidate in the literacy education track, adviser Tim Lensmire) have been awarded Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships for 2009-2010 from the Graduate School. Guzey's dissertation employs an interpretive multiple case study design and focuses on science teachers who are able to use technology in meaningful ways to teach students not only how to learn science but how to "do" science. Jatau's interpretive ethnography study explores the experiences of young women in schools in her native country, Nigeria; specifically, she is interested in the meaning of schooling for them and how this relates to their ongoing participation (or not) in educational institutions.

May 4, 2009

C&I alumna Amber Place Damm named 2009 Minnesota Teacher of the Year

Curriculum and Instruction alumna Amber Place Damm (M.Ed. '02), a seventh- and eighth-grade English and language arts teacher at Clara Barton Open School in Minneapolis, was named 2009 Minnesota Teacher of the Year on Sunday, May 3. She is also Minnesota's nominee for National Teacher of the Year for 2010.

Monday, May 4, 2009 Minneapolis Star Tribune article

KARE 11 news interview with Amber Damm.

Teacher of the Year Minnesota blog article

Minnesota Public Radio
article and photo

April 27, 2009

Swiss is finalist in new media poetry competition

Thom SwissThe Paris-based International Poetry Biennial has announced that Professor Thom Swiss Ph.D., Curriculum and instruction, is a finalist in the new media poetry competition judged by an international jury. His work will be exhibited in Paris this summer while Swiss is teaching at the American University of Paris as Professor of Global Communications. New media poems by Swiss appear in the current issue of Hyperrhiz , a new media journal of art and literature, and the Poetry Project by the Walker Art Museum.

April 18, 2009

Lewis receives Robert H. Beck teaching award

Cynthia LewisProfessor Cynthia Lewis, Ph.D., Curriculum and Instruction, has received the Robert H. Beck Faculty Teaching Award for her outstanding contributions to education. The award is given for excellence in teaching and advising, innovation in academic program development, and outstanding educational leadership. The award was presented to Lewis at the College of Education and Human Development Alumni Society awards celebration held April 17, 2009. Recipients of the award are nominated by their students.

April 15, 2009

Three culture and teaching (CaT) students awarded graduate fellowships for 2009-10

Thom SwissMistilina Sato Bic Ngo Tim Lensmire Culture and Teaching (CaT) faculty Tim Lensmire, Bic Ngo, Mistilina Sato, and Thom Swiss in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction are pleased to announce three incoming graduate students who have received graduate fellowships for 2009-10. All three incoming students will all be working in areas related to race, culture, diversity, and education.

Postdoctoral Fellow Vichet Chhuon is currently at the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at the University of California - Santa Barbara; his research interests include multicultural education, achievement motivation, adolescent development, and Asian American education. Diversity of Views and Experiences (DOVE ) Fellow Brian Lozenski has research interests in race, social justice and culturally relevant pedagogy. Graduate School Fellow Shannon McManimon has research interests in peace studies, "whiteness," race, and social justice.

Please welcome these outstanding students of diversity and culture to the College next academic year when you meet them.

April 13, 2009

Lewis is featured on "Future Tense" radio program

Cynthia LewisCynthia Lewis, Ph.D., professor in Curriculum and Instruction, was interviewed by Jon Gordon, host of American Public Media's "Future Tense" radio broadcast, on Friday, April 10, 2009 for a feature titled "Engaging kids with social media" about the "DigME" digital media program at Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis.

April 8, 2009

Swiss receives Arts & Humanities Faculty Award

Thom SwissThom Swiss, Ph.D., professor in Curriculum and Instruction, has been selected by the Imagine Fund Arts, Design, and Humanities faculty committee to receive a 2009-10 Annual Arts & Humanities Faculty Award of $3000 for his project in "new media poetics, poetry, and pedagogy."

March 31, 2009

Lewis leads partnership with Roosevelt High School's DigME program

Cynthia LewisProfessor Cynthia Lewis, Ph.D., Department of Curriculum and Instruction, leads a team of C&I faculty who have served as partners in implementing and supporting DigME, a new digital media program at Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis. The program is an interdisciplinary program focusing on disciplinary knowledge and critical thinking through the use of digital media analysis and production. It is meant to promote school engagement, learning, and achievement. See accompanying news article and video below.

UMNews article by Diane Cormany The name says DigME--and they do:

The U is helping give Roosevelt High School students experience with digital technologies

Twitter in the classroom? U of M's DigME program brings high-tech learning to Minneapolis school

March 19, 2009

Beach receives computers in reading research award

Richard BeachRichard Beach, Ph.D., professor in Curriculum and Instruction, will receive the 2009 Computers in Reading Research Award from the technology in literacy education special interest group of the International Reading Association at the association's convention on May 7 in Minneapolis. This award is given in recognition of high quality research related to adolescents, literacy, and uses of digital media.

February 28, 2009

Chhuon receives postdoc position in Curriculum and Instruction

Vichet Chhuon, currently at the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education at the University of California - Santa Barbara, will join the Department of Curriculum and Instruction as a postdoctoral fellow next year. Vichet's research interests are in multicultural education, achievement motivation, adolescent development, and Asian American education. He will join faculty members Bic Ngo, Tim Lensmire, Mistilina Sato, and Thom Swiss in the department's culture and teaching track.

February 20, 2009

Mayo receives multicultural research award

J. B. MayoJ. B. Mayo, Jr., Ph.D., assistant professor in Curriculum and Instruction, has been awarded a 2009 President's Faculty Multicultural Research Award in the amount of $7000 for a project entitled "Seeking the Spirit(s) Among Minnesota's Ojibwe Nation."

Beach, Boeser, and Doerr-Stevens featured on teaching podcast

Richard Beach Richard Beach, Ph.D., professor in Curriculum and Instruction, with Jefferson High School English teacher Liz Boeser (M.Ed., C&I), and doctoral student Candance Doerr-Stevens (C&I: Literacy Education), were featured on EdTechTalk's Teachers Teaching Teachers podcast about the use of online role-play to engage students in persuasive writing.

February 9, 2009

Cooke receives MnAEYC award

Betty Betty Cooke, Ph.D., lecturer in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction (family, youth, and community), received the Minnesota Association for the Education of Young Children's Evelyn House Award in recognition of her outstanding contribution to the field of early childhood and family education and to MnAEYC. The award was presented to Cooke on February 6, 2009 by MnAEYC co-president Angele Sancho Passe.

February 5, 2009

Swiss has new publications

Thom SwissThom Swiss, Ph.D., professor of culture and teaching in Curriculum and Instruction, co-authored a new book with professor Richard Beach, Ph.D., professor in Curriculum and Instruction and others. Written for teachers, the book is: Teaching Writing Using Blogs, Wikis, and other Digital Tools.

His next book, co-edited with Colleen Sheehy, formerly a director at the Weisman Art Museum, is Highway 61 Revisited
Bob Dylan’s Road from Minnesota to the World
. It will be published by the University of Minnesota Press in March.

A co-authored article, "Producing Producers: Women and Electronic Dance Music," a cultural analysis with pedagogical implications for the teaching of music in high schools, appears in the new issue of Current Musicology, published by Columbia University.

January 28, 2009

Doering selected as Institute on the Environment fellow

Aaron DoeringAaron Doering, Ph.D., assistant professor in Curriculum and Instruction, was selected as a participant in the Institute on the Environment's first cohort of resident fellows following a rigorous selection process. The twenty fellows will begin their three-year appointments with the Institute in June 2009.

Doering will receive flexible funding to engage in creative research and problem solving, to develop new models of teaching and training, and to build new networks and partnerships. In addition, the fellows will take part in leadership development activities, along with ongoing seminars, roundtables and other public engagement efforts. "Our emphasis with this new program is on creative work: how can we give people the time and space to do truly original research and thinking," says Jonathan Foley, director of the Institute on the Environment. "The fellowships will give both up-and-coming and established leaders the opportunity to work together on finding 'outside the box' solutions to the world's biggest environmental problems...This cohort of fellows is an amazing, eclectic group of thinkers and doers. They were drawn from the 'best and brightest' of the University, selected for their creativity and willingness to try new ideas".

January 5, 2009

Sato and Lensmire publish in Phi Delta Kappan

Misty SatoMisty Sato Ph.D., assistant professor in Curriculum and Instruction and Tim Lensmire Ph.D., associate professor in Curriculum and Instruction, have just published an article in the January 2009 edition of Phi Delta Kappan titled "Poverty and Payne: Supporting teachers to work with children of poverty." Kappan is the professional education journal of Phi Delta Kappa, a professional education organization of more than 50,000 members worldwide. The article grew out of a talk given through the Department of Curriculum & Instruction Diversity Dialogue series.

Sato & Lensmire argue that the work of Ruby Payne, who published a widely-used book about teaching children of Tim Lensmirepoverty (a book frequently referenced by educators in Minnesota), is based on deficit thinking about children and their capacity to learn and relies on a model of teacher professional development that will not bring about the changes we need in classroom teaching. Ruby Payne provides a response to their criticisms.

December 17, 2008

Bigelow featured in ResearchWorks

The importance of assistant professor Martha Bigelow's (Curriculum and Instruction) research on helping immigrants learn a second language and helping teachers teach students with limited literacy and language proficiency is highlighted in the College's ResearchWorks bulletin.

Printer-friendly version (pdf)

December 11, 2008

Doering and GoNorth! in the news

Assistant professor Aaron Doering (Curriculum and Instruction) has been interviewed and quoted recently in several publications, including MPR and the Star Tribune.

Aaron was interviewed on Minnesota Public Radio on November 20 in response to Governor Tim Pawlenty's goal of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system offering a quarter of college credits to students online by the year 2015.

Aaron was also interviewed and quoted in the Star Tribune on December 3 on an article about online learning and the BlueSky Charter School.

BlueSky Charter School: Staying in school -- online
Star Tribune (Minn.) Dec. 3, 2008

Finally, Aaron and the GoNorth! adventure learning program was featured on NBC in the Bay Area on December 7. The GoNorth! program was highlighted as one of the top ways in the world technology is benefitting humanity. Watch the television segment.

Greenhow wins grant for youth and social media study

GreenhowC-2007-Pref.jpgPostdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow (Curriculum and Instruction) has received a $250,000 grant from the Knight Foundation, in partnership with Seattle technology company NewsCloud, to study youth engagement with social media.

Christine and research team members will investigate how strategic applications in online social networking sites such as Facebook can engage youth in world events, build community, and generate real world impact. The research has been funded with a grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Results from the Youth and Social Media study will contribute insights on youth's digital literacy practices in social networking environments and how to deliver educational materials in innovative and promising ways.

Christine is this year's recipient of the University's Outstanding Postdoctoral Scholar Award and the founding chair of the interdisciplinary Social Networks Research Collaborative, housed within the Institute for Advanced Studies.

December 8, 2008

Greenhow quoted in report on undergrads and technology

GreenhowC-2007-Pref.jpgPostdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow (Curriculum and Instruction) was recently quoted in an EDUCAUSE-sponsored report on undergraduate students and technology.

The report is entitled "The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information
Technology." Christine is quoted in the featured chapter on Social Networking Sites (pp. 81-98).

Download the report.
(pdf)

November 18, 2008

Doering receives Crystal Award

DoeringAssistant Professor Aaron Doering (Curriculum and Instruction) recently received the Crystal Award during the Association for Educational Communications and Technology's Annual Convention.

The Crystal Award recognizes scholars who demonstrate innovation and outstanding achievement in the practice of distance learning.

Congratulations, Aaron!


November 13, 2008

Learning technologies: Presentations and honors

Students, faculty members, and alumni from the learning technologies program (Department of Curriculum and Instruction) have recently given presentations and received several honors.

  • Aaron Doering was the keynote speaker for GeoFest Minnesota at Macalester College
  • Aaron Doering, Charles Miller, Cassie Scharber, George Veletsianos, and Simon Hooper were honored in AECT's Design and Development Showcase for their work building the online K-12s learning environment, GeoThentic.
  • Brad Hosack was honored in AECT's Design and Development Showcase for his work building VideoANT, an online environment which allows for the synchronization of Web-based video with an author's timeline-based text annotations.

Learning technologies: Recent publications

Several students and faculty members in the learning technologies program (Department of Curriculum and Instruction) have recently published articles.

Article citations (learning technologies students and faculty are in bold):

  • Griffith, A. K., Nelson, J. R., Epstein, M. H., & Pederson, B. (2008). Convergent validity of the early childhood behavior problem screening scale. Journal of Early Intervention, 30(4).
  • Miller, C., Hooper, S., Rose, S., Montalto-Rook, M. (2008). Transforming e-assessment in American Sign Language: Pedagogical and technological enhancements in online language learning and performance assessment. Learning, Media and Technology, 33(3), 155-168.
  • Miller, C., & Hooper, S. (2008). Avenue ASL: Transforming curriculum through design, theory, and innovation. Tech Trends, 52(3), 27-32.
  • Miller, C., Veletsianos, G., & Doering, A. (2008). Curriculum at forty below: A phenomenological inquiry of an educator/explorer’s experience with adventure learning in the Arctic. Distance Education 29(3).
  • O’Brien, D. G. & Scharber, C. (2008, September). Digital literacies go to school: Potholes and possibilities. Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, 52(1), 66-68.
  • Scharber, C., Dexter, S., & Riedel, E. (2008). Students’ experiences with an automated essay scorer. Journal of Technology, Learning, and Assessment, 7(1). Available online at http://www.jtla.org.

November 10, 2008

Bigelow discusses Muslim students in MN schools

BigelowAssociate Professor Martha Bigelow (Curriculum and Instruction) published an editorial offering advice on how educate and engage Muslim students in Minnesota schools.

Educating Muslim students in Minnesota: The skill and the will
MinnPost (Minn.) Nov. 7, 2008

November 3, 2008

Jacobs talks about teachable moments

JacobsAssistant Professor Ben Jacobs (Curriculum and Instruction) offers comment in a story on how teachers are using the nation's financial troubles to help students understand abstract economics concepts.

Schools turn economic crisis into lessons from real life
Star Tribune (Minn.) Nov. 1, 2008

October 28, 2008

Roehrig receives $500K Head Start grant

RoehrigAssociate Professor Gillian Roehrig (Curriculum and Instruction) is the principal investigator for a $497,711 Head Start grant beginning in late 2008 and ending in August 2011 to develop and study a culturally-relevant science and math curriculum for Head Start programs on the White Earth reservation.

Her co-investigators are Barbara Murphy, Director of Shirley G. Moore Lab School in the Institute of Child Development, and Steven Carlson in Extension Natural Resources in the Department of Forest Resources.

This interdisciplinary, collaborative project will provide extensive training about the nature of science and math, how children learn, science as inquiry, and how to integrate science and math with Ojibwe cultural curriculum. Monthly mentoring will be provided to Head Start teachers over the grant period, and community members will be included in the Head Start science and math activities. The curriculum will connect to the world around reservation children, and build on their current cultural curriculum.

Avery receives grants for evaluation research

AveryP-2002-Pref.jpgProfessor Pat Avery (Curriculum and Instruction) is the recipient of two grants, one of approximately $75,000 and one of approximately $90,000 from the Constitutional Rights Foundation to continue her evaluation work on "Deliberating in a Democracy in the United States, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Lithuania, and Russia."

Miller and Rose receive $400K grant

Postdoctoral Associate Charlie Miller (Curriculum and Instruction) and Associate Professor Sue Rose (Educational Psychology) have received a Phase I Department of Education Stepping Stones grant in the amount of $399,942 for the period October 2008 through September 2010 to develop a technology-based avenue for progress monitoring with deaf and hard of hearing students.

Moore wins five-year quality improvement grant

MooreAssistant Professor Tamara Moore will receive $75,000 over a five-year period to evaluate a significant quality improvement initiative focused on Itasca Community College’s Engineering program.

The evaluation is supported by the Blandin Foundation and is part of an overall $2.5 million quality improvement project funded by Blandin, the National Science Foundation, and the Community College.

September 30, 2008

Greenhow paper featured at NTLS

GreenhowPostdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow (Curriculum and Instruction), was invited to participate in the National Technology Leadership Summit (NTLS) in Washington, D.C. where her recently published paper on bridging informal and formal learning with participatory media was featured.

Greenhow, C. (2008). Connecting informal and formal learning experiences in the age of participatory media: Commentary on Bull et al. (2008). Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 8(2). Retrieved from http://www.citejournal.org/vol8/iss3/editorial/article1.cfm.

The National Technology Leadership Summit is a select group of federal policymakers, corporate representatives, nonprofit leaders, journal editors, and scholars who convene annually to draft field-shaping recommendations for research, policy, and programs to accelerate the meaningful impact of digital technologies in K-16 and graduate education. Christine has been active in helping draft a new funding program which has been included in the Higher Education Act Reauthorization bill with sponsorship of Congresswoman Betty McCollum and is working with colleagues to shape the research agenda stemming from this meeting.

September 17, 2008

Greenhow comments on technology and teens

GreenhowPostdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow (Curriculum and Instruction) comments on the benefits of technology in a recent KARE-11 story.

Teen Tech Experiment: Can teens survive without their cell phones?
KARE-11 (Minn.) Sept. 17, 2008

September 11, 2008

GoNorth! receives Tech Laureate award

GoNorth! has been named a 2008 Tech Awards Laureate by the Tech Museum of Innovation.

GoNorth! was selected from among hundreds of nominations representing 68 countries as one of 25 innovators from around the world recognized for applying technology to benefit humanity.

The Tech Awards: Technology Benefiting Humanity is one of the premier annual humanitarian awards programs in the world.

Recognizing technical solutions that benefit humanity and address the most critical issues facing our planet and its people, the awards program honors 25 scientists and innovators annually alongside the recipient of the Global Humanitarian Award.

Read the full press release.

September 8, 2008

Shumer lectures on service learning

Lecturer Rob Shumer (Department of Curriculum and Instruction) recently gave a presentation on service learning to the Orange County Public Schools Learning Service Program in Florida.

You can read more about Rob's presentation, and download accompanying handouts here.

September 2, 2008

Roehrig and Wyberg receive $500K grant for teacher prep

RoehrigWybergThe National Science Foundation recently awarded a $500,000 grant to Associate Professor Gillian Roehrig and Lecturer Terry Wyberg, both in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, for a teacher preparation project.

This project, titled "Project IMPACT: Improving Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry Teaching," is under the direction of Roehrig, Wyberg, and Professor Cynthia A. Cattell in the University's Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Congratulations to all three grant recipients!

August 25, 2008

Beach appointed to NCTE media commission

BeachR-2004[1].jpgProfessor Richard Beach (Department of Curriculum and Instruction) was recently appointed to serve as a member of the Commission on Media for the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE).

Richard's term will begin after the 2008 Annual Convention, scheduled for November 20-25 in San Antonio. The goal of this commission is to help teachers understand the value, possibilities, and constraints of multi-modal literacies and to support advocacy work with schools and educational policymakers.

Congratulations, Richard!

July 21, 2008

Greenhow wins postdoc award

GreenhowPostdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow (Curriculum and Instruction) has received the University's Outstanding Postdoctoral Scholar Award. The award recognizes extraordinary performance and achievement of postdoctoral scholars at the University of Minnesota. Each recipient will receive an honorarium of $1,000 and will be recognized at the annual Postdoctoral Reception in fall 2008.

Congratulations, Chris!

July 14, 2008

Another Driven to Discover star is born!

DoeringThe Office of University Relations has selected Assistant Professor Aaron Doering (Curriculum and Instruction) and his adventure learning/GoNorth! research for its next round of Driven to Discover television ads. He is one of only four faculty selected from across the entire University this year.

Aaron follows in the glamorous footsteps of Professor Nicki Crick (Institute of Child Development), whose research on relational aggression was featured in last year's TV ads.

Look for Aaron's commercial to start airing in October.

Congratulations to the entire GoNorth! team.

July 1, 2008

Norway officials visit CEHD

On June 30, Trond Febolden, Permanent Secretary of Norway's Ministry of Education and Linda Pederson, Vice Council for the Norwegian Consulate in Minneapolis, visited CEHD. Febolden is responsible for writing the white paper that will guide the reform of teacher education in Norway. During his visit, Febolden met with Carole Gupton and Bob Utke from the Preparation to Practice Group and Ruth Thomas, Tom Post, Aaron Doering, Terry Wyberg, Misty Sato, and Dee Tedick, all from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

During this official visit, the Norwegian delegation will also visit Hamline University, Augsburg College, and the Minnesota Department of Education. At the close of the visit, Febolden expressed interest in establishing formal collaborations between the Norwegian Ministry of Education and CEHD.

June 26, 2008

Social networking news spreads far and wide

Greenhow
A recent study by postdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow (Curriculum and Instruction) on the educational benefits of social networking sites has been garnering media attention from around the world. Below are several multimedia pieces on the study, as well as links to articles.

Download a fully produced podcast on the study.

Digital divide? What digital divide?

THE Journal (Calif.) June 2008

New research reveals educational benefits of social networking web sites
TMCnet.com (Conn.) June 20, 2008

MySpace, Facebook & Orkut's educational side revealed
Economic Times (India) June 21, 2008

KSTP 5 Eyewitness News AM
KSTP (Minn.) June 21, 2008

Social studies
Erie Times-News (Pa.) June 22, 2008

Social networking sites provide educational benefits to students - study
Telecom Paper (The Netherlands) June 23, 2008

Even poor kids are social network savvy
Scientific American (N.Y.) June 26, 2008

View more articles on the study.

June 18, 2008

Alum Butterfield receives Top Teacher award

Earlier this year, one of FOX 9's Top Teacher awards was given to Donna Butterfield, a family and consumer sciences teacher at Richfield Middle School here in Minnesota. Donna is a CEHD alum, with an M.Ed. in family education. She has also served as a cooperating teacher for the family and consumer sciences program. Vist MyFox Twin Cities to see Donna accept the award or to read her nomination letter.

Congratulations, Donna!

O'Brien and Dillon present Guys Read evaluation

Professors David O'Brien and Deborah Dillon (Curriculum and Instruction) presented the results of their two-year evaluation of Hennepin County Library's Guys Read book discussion program in March. Their audience was more than 100 librarians from all parts of the country attending the national conference of the Public Library Association (PLA), a division of the American Library Association.

In her letter of thanks, Gretchen Wronka, Youth Services and Outreach Coordinator at the Hennepin County Library wrote: “Drs. O'Brien and Dillon's Guys Read research is ground-breaking. No other public library in the country has engaged in this kind of academic, neutral evaluation of a children's book discussion program."

Several C&I graduate students are also part of this project: Cassie Scharber, Brad Biggs, Kristen Nichols-Besel, and Beth Brendler.

Dillon gives tips on motivating young readers

DillonProfessor Deborah Dillon (Curriculum and Instruction) offers advice to adults on encouraging their children to read.

"A Place of Our Own"
PBS (Va.) June 17, 2008

Greenhow organizes guest lecture

GreenhowIn April postdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow (Curriculum and Instruction) organized and hosted a guest lecture by Eszter Hargittai of Northwestern University titled “The Digital Production of Inequality." The lecture was co-sponsored by the University's Social Networks Research Collaborative and the Institute for Advanced Study.

June 11, 2008

CEHD students part of community garden

Master's student Peter DeLong (Social Work) and doctoral student Judi Petkau (Curriculum & Instruction) are both mentioned in a recent article on the Southeast Como neighborhood's community garden.

Community gardening season gets started in southeast Como
Minnesota Daily (Minn.) June 11, 2008

June 5, 2008

Alum Clyne named principal of Illinois school

Alumna Sarah Clyne (M.Ed., second languages and cultures) has been named principal of Washington Elementary School in the Champaign, Illinois school district.

Champaign hires 3 principals for fall
News-Gazette (Ill.) June 5, 2008

May 29, 2008

Shumer receives service-learning award

Lecturer Rob Shumer (WHRE, C&I) has been named a John Glenn Scholar in Service-Learning . The award, which was given by the John Glenn School of Public Affairs at The Ohio State University, honors individuals who have made significant contributions to advancing service-learning scholarship, particularly in the K-12 context. In particular, the award honors Rob's 2006 publication, The Wisdom of Delphi: An investigation of the most influential studies in K-12 service-learning research in the past 25 years.

Congratulations, Rob!

May 27, 2008

Swiss comments on pop culture and education

SwissProfessor Thom Swiss (Curriculum and Instruction) comments in an article on the Minnesota Science Museum's new Star Wars exhibit.

'Star Wars' exhibit comes to Science Museum, but is it science?
MinnPost (Minn.) May 23, 2008

May 7, 2008

Learning technologies: Recent publication

George Veletsianos (Ph.D. candidate, learning technologies), Cassie Scharber (Ph.D. candidate, learning technologies and literacy), and Assistant Professor Aaron Doering, have contributed a paper titled "When Sex, Drugs, and Violence Enter the Classroom: Conversations between Adolescent Social Studies Students and a Female Pedagogical Agent" for the latest issue of Interacting with Computers.

The paper investigates the discourse between a female conversational pedagogical agent and 59 adolescents in the context of a social studies lesson. A close look at learner–agent discourse revealed that learners readily misuse and abuse virtual characters while treating them as subordinate and inferior objects.

Veletsianos, G., Scharber, C., & Doering, A. (2008). When sex, drugs, and violence enter the classroom: Conversations between adolescent social studies students and a female pedagogical agent. Interacting with Computers, 20(3), 292-301.

May 5, 2008

Sato, Jacobs, and Avery publish article on MNTERC study

Assistant Professor Mistilina Sato, Assistant Professor Benjamin Jacobs, and Professor Patricia Avery published “Preparing Minnesota Teachers for Diverse Contexts." [PDF] in the Spring 2008 issue of CURA Reporter. The article summarizes initial findings from an ongoing study being conducted by the Minnesota Teacher Education Research Consortium (MNTERC)—a team of researchers from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minnesota State University-Mankato, and the College of St. Catherine—on how teacher preparation experiences contribute to the instructional practices of teachers in Minnesota’s increasingly diverse schools. The first phase of the project was supported by a Faculty Interactive Research Program grant from the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs here at the University. Other members of the research team include Mary Bents (UMN), Linda Distad (St. Kate’s), Jane Gilles (UMN), Taeho Jung (UMN), Daria Paul Dona (MSU-Mankato), Maia Sheppard (UMN), and Ken Vos (St. Kate’s).

Ngo named Interdisciplinary Grad Faculty Teaching Fellow

NgoAssistant Professor Bic Ngo (Curriculum and Instruction) has been named one of the University’s Interdisciplinary Graduate Faculty Teaching Fellows for 2008-10. Interdisciplinary Graduate Faculty Teaching Fellowships are intended to foster and support best practices in interdisciplinary graduate research, teaching, and writing at the University. Faculty fellows engage with each other as members of a mutual interdisciplinary intellectual community while simultaneously working to develop and teach new interdisciplinary graduate dissertation seminars. The seminars seek to exemplify best practices in interdisciplinary graduate education and to serve as institutional models for interdisciplinary pedagogy and dissertation writing support.

April 29, 2008

Greenhow on WCCO Radio

GreenhowOn April 12 postdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow (Curriculum and Instruction) was interviewed on WCCO Radio on the topic "Social Network Sites like MySpace and Facebook among Teens." Download the interview. [.mp3]

April 28, 2008

Sato receives fellowship from Knowles Science Teaching Foundation

SatoAssistant Professor Misty Sato (Curriculum and Instruction) recently received a Young Scholars Research Fellowship from the Knowles Science Teaching Foundation. One of only four awarded nationally, the award provides support for the recipient’s research over a two-year period.

April 21, 2008

DeLapp receives SIFEPP award

DeLappP-Pref[1].jpgTeaching Specialist Peggy DeLapp (Curriculum and Instruction) was recently awarded one of only 15 prestigious State’s Impact on Federal Education Policy (SIFEPP) Conference Fellow Awards. This honor is for doctoral candidates, advanced degree recipients, and persons engaged in early career research, and recipients will participate in the SIFEPP conference, which takes place at the Holiday Inn Capitol in Washington, D.C. on May 8 and 9, 2008.

April 8, 2008

UCCS endowed professorship to honor alum Swaby

The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs (UCCS) College of Education is establishing the Dr. Barbara Swaby Endowed Professorship to honor CEHD alum Barbara Swaby (M.A., '73, elementary education; Ph.D., '77, education). A $500,000 community fundraising effort is under way to create the endowed chair. This is the first endowed professorship for the UCCS College of Education.

Creating readers, one child at a time

Gazette (Colo.) April 6, 2008

March 17, 2008

Pike tells Daily about spring break plans

Graduate student Rachel Pike (elementary education) answered the Daily's question of the week in Friday's issue. Read Rachel's response on page 2.

Question of the week: What are you doing over spring break?
Minnesota Daily (Minn.) March 14, 2008

Taylor discusses Reading First cuts

TaylorB-2005[1].jpgProfessor Barbara Taylor (Curriculum and Instruction), director of the Minnesota Center for Reading Research, comments on recent cuts to the federally-funded Reading First program.

Popular Minnesota reading program may fall victim to Washington politics
Minnesota Public Radio (Minn.) March 14, 2008

March 12, 2008

Media attention for GoNorth! Fennoscandia

DoeringA-2008[1].jpgNews about the latest GoNorth! expedition to Fennoscandia is popping up all over:

GoNorth! Team Prepares for Fennoscandian Expedition
KARE-11 (Minn.) Feb. 21, 2008

GoNorth! team prepares to take off
KARE-11 (Minn.) Feb. 28, 2008

K-12ers watch Arctic explorers 'GoNorth'
Minnesota Daily (Minn.) March 12, 2008

Assistant Professor Aaron Doering is the Education Director of GoNorth!

February 14, 2008

Dubbels: press and publication

Doctoral student Brock Dubbels (Curriculum and Instruction) recently had a book chapter accepted for publication:

Dubbels, B.R. (in press) Video games, reading, and transmedial comprehension. In R. E. Ferdig (Ed.), Handbook of research on effective electronic gaming in education. Information Science Reference.

Dubbels was also quoted in an article on classroom blogging practices:

Web 2.0: 5 don't s of classroom blogging pages
Technology Horizons in Education (THE) Journal (Calif.) Feb. 2008

Congratulations Brock!

Ngo edits Theory Into Practice issue

NgoB-2007[1].jpg“Immigrant Families and U.S. Schools" is the theme of Theory Into Practice, Winter 2008, Volume 47, Number 1, guest edited by Assistant Professor Bic Ngo (Curriculum and Instruction). This issue illustrates the complexity of immigrant education and the critical role of teachers and schools in the transformation of culture and identity and academic achievement. Authors for the issue are: Bic Ngo; Nina Asher; Lesa M. Clarkson; Martha Bigelow; Xue Lan Rong and Paul Fitchett; Nancy López; Stacey J. Lee and Margaret R. Hawkins; Loukia K. Sarroub; and Cindy Cruz.

Read the full press release.

February 13, 2008

Hansens publish literacy manual

Hansens.jpgEmeritus Professor Harlan Hansen (Curriculum and Instruction) and his wife Ruth Hansen (Ph.D. '81, curriculum and instruction) have published The Literate Child: A Developmentally Appropriate Program for Helping Four-Year-Old Children Acquire Basic and Literacy Skills. The manual was developed with a grant from the Naples (Fla.) Foundation and includes 36 outcomes and related activities.

The Hansens have been conducting free workshops for teachers and by the end of February all teachers of four-year-olds in Collier County, Florida, will have received a free copy.

February 6, 2008

Fortune, Tedick publish book

PathwaysToMultilinguism.jpgA new edited volume on language immersion education, co-edited by Tara Williams Fortune (Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition) and associate professsor Diane J. Tedick (Curriculum and Instruction), has just become available from Multilingual Matters, Ltd. The volume, Pathways to Multilingualism: Evolving Perspectives on Immersion Education, features chapters by many of the world’s leading scholars in the field of language immersion education.

Immersion celebration a rousing success

This past Tuesday the MAIN Immersion Celebration was held at Northrop Auditorium. MAIN — Minnesota Advocates for Immersion Network — is a non-profit organization comprised of educators that represent Minnesota’s immersion programs and University members representing CEHD’s second languages and cultures education program in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and the Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition (CARLA) Immersion Projects.

See a 5-minute video clip of the event from WCCO.

MAIN began these events three years ago to bring together students from Minnesota’s many immersion programs to celebrate the languages and cultures they are learning. The event brought together 19 Twin Cities immersion programs representing six languages and the three types of immersion programs supported through the second languages and cultures education program and CARLA’s Immersion Projects—one-way (foreign language) immersion, with programs in Chinese, French, German, and Spanish; two-way (bilingual) immersion, with programs in Spanish/English; and indigenous immersion, with programs in Dakota and Ojibwe.

The celebration, generously supported by the University’s Institute for Global Studies, Office of International Programs, and College Readiness Consortium, was a huge success. Nearly 1,300 students were in attendance and many parents, school district personnel, and U of M faculty and administrators were there to see the show. The event was organized by a subcommittee of MAIN that was spearheaded by associate professor Diane Tedick (Curriculum and Instruction), Rachel Richardson (immersion parent, St. Louis Park Public Schools) and Megan Unger (immersion teacher, Minneapolis Public Schools).

February 4, 2008

Faculty, staff present at AACTE annual meeting

CEHD_v_lockup_black.gifThe American Association for Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE) will hold its annual meeting in New Orleans Feb 6-10. College faculty and staff will make several presentations at the meeting.

Presentation 1
Improving Teacher Education Through a Multi-Institutional Collaboration: The Minnesota Teacher Education Research Consortium
Mary L. Bents, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Michael Miller, Minnesota State University, Mankato; Linda Distad, St. Catherine University

Profiles of First-Year Teaching Experiences and Implications for Teacher Preparation
Mistilina Sato, Benjamin Jacobs, and Maia Sheppard, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Survey Analysis of First-Year Teachers
Patricia Avery and Jane Gilles, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Daria Paul Dona, Minnesota State University, Mankato; Ken Vos, College of St. Catherine

Presentation 2
Launching a New College of Education and Human Development: Future Directions for Educator Development
Jane Gilles, Mistillina Sato, Mary Bents, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Presentation 3
Innovation in On-line Programs Engaging Cooperating Teachers in On-line, Facilitated, Case Discussions
Mistilina Sato and Robert Utke, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Panel
The Intersection of Teacher Preparation, Accreditation, and Research: How Research Universities Can Leverage Their Strength to Strengthen Accreditation and Teach Preparation
Presenters: David H. Monk, Pennsylvania State University; Darlyne Bailey, University of Minnesota; Robert C. Pianta,
University of Virginia
Moderator: Art Wise, NCATE

Greenhow: Recent publications

GreenhowC-2007-Pref[1].jpg
Postdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow (Curriculum and Instruction) recently published an article.

Greenhow, C. & Belbas, B. (2007) Using activity-oriented design methods to study collaborative knowledge-building in e-learning courses. International Journal of Computer-supported Collaborative Learning, 4 (2), 363-391.

January 25, 2008

Taylor on Wireless Generation advisory board

TaylorB-2005[1].jpgProfessor Barbara Taylor, director of the Minnesota Center on Reading Research, is a member of the Wireless Generation advisory board. Wireless Generation is the creator of FreeReading.net, a free, sequential, research-based reading intervention program designed for students in kindergarten through first grade.

Florida adopts open-content reading platform
eSchool News (Md.) Jan. 24, 2008

January 14, 2008

Green to deliver MLK Day homily

Alumnus Bill Green (M.A., educational psychology; Ph.D., education), superintendent of Minneapolis public schools, will deliver a homily at Gustavus Adolphus College in celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Mixed Blood Theatre to perform on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Gustavus News (Minn.) Jan. 11, 2007

January 7, 2008

College receives $2 million endowed chair; Doering to fill

AaronDoering.jpgThe College has received a $2 million gift commitment from alumnus Dan Huebner for the creation of the Bonnie Westby Huebner Endowed Chair in Education and Technology. The endowment fund will support faculty in the field of school-based learning, with a strong emphasis on the value of technology in education.

Aaron Doering will be the first faculty member to hold the chair. Aaron is an assistant professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction and education director of GoNorth!, an adventure learning project for K-12 classrooms. Read the full press release here.

Congratulations, Aaron!

Dillon to fill Guy Bond chair

DillonD-2005[1].jpgProfessor Deborah Dillon will fill the College's Guy Bond Chair in Reading. One of the nation’s leading reading education scholars, Deborah began her career as a classroom teacher in rural Nebraska working with students in grades four through six. She holds a doctoral degree from the University of Georgia and has taught in CEHD’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction since 2001. Read the full press release here.

Congratulations, Deborah!

December 21, 2007

Lewis book receives Edward Fry award

LewisC-0000-Pref[1].jpg
Professor Cynthia Lewis (Curriculum and Instruction) and her fellow co-editors of the recently published Reframing Sociocultural Research on Literacy: Identity, Agency, and Power have won the Edward Fry Book Award from the National Reading Conference. The award is given annually to recognize a book that makes a noteworthy contribution to research in the field of literacy. Read the previous news entry about the book here.

Congratulations Cynthia!

December 19, 2007

Need to engage boys who don't read, says O'Brien

ObrienD-2002[1].jpgProfessor David O'Brien (Curriculum and Instruction) comments on the need for literacy programs aimed at boys to attract more non-readers (as opposed to boys who are already avid readers).


"Boys and books: How do you get them together?"

Star Tribune (Minn.) Dec. 18, 2007

December 17, 2007

Learning technologies: Recent publications

Faculty and graduate students in the learning technologies program within the Department of Curriculum and Instruction have recently published several book chapters.

Assistant Professor Aaron Doering, Dr. Joan Hughes (now at the University of Texas at Austin), and Cassie Scharber (Ph.D. candidate in learning technologies and literacy) have contributed a chapter titled "Online Learning and Social Studies" in ISTE's new book, What Works in K-12 Online Learning.

Doering, George Veletsianos (Ph.D. candidate in learning technologies), and Scharber have contributed a chapter titled "Coming of Age: Research and Pedagogy on Geospatial Technologies within K-12 Social Studies Education" in a new book published by Information Age Publishing titled Digital Geography: Geo-Spatial Technologies in the Social Studies Classroom.

Doering and Veletsianos have recently published a paper entitled "Multi-Scaffolding Learning Environment: An Analysis of Scaffolding and Its Impact on Cognitive Load and Problem-Solving Ability" in the Journal of Educational Computing Research.

Brad Hokanson (associate professor in the Department of Design, Housing and Apparel), Charles Miller (postdoctoral associate in learning technologies), and Dr. Simon Hooper (now at Pennsylvania State) recently published a chapter titled "Commodity, firmness, and delight: Four modes of instructional design practice" in the Handbook of Visual Languages for Instructional Design: Theories and Practices.

December 13, 2007

Literacy ed students present in Texas

A team of researchers recently presented at the National Reading Conference in Austin, Texas. "Motivating Boys to Read: An Evaluation of a Community Library Book Club Program" was presented by literacy education graduate students Cassie Scharber, Kristen Nichols-Besel, Brad Biggs, and Beth Brendler and professors Deborah Dillon and David O'Brien from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction.

December 7, 2007

CI students win UROP grants

Sophmore Emma Yang and senior Manu Kuffour, both in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, have been awarded UROP grants to support research on learning technologies. Both students will be exploring learning with social computing technologies as part of Dr. Christine Greenhow’s Social Networks Research Collaborative.

Congratulations to these motivated students!

December 5, 2007

Ngo: Recent publication

NgoB-2007[1].jpgAssistant Professor Bic Ngo (Curriculum and Instruction) recently published the following article.

Ngo, B., and Lee, S. (2007). Complicating the Image of Model Minority Success: A Review of Southeast Asian American Education. Review of Educational Research, 77(4), 415-453.

November 19, 2007

Greenhow featured in UMN Brief

Postdoctoral associate Chris Greenhow (Currculum and Instruction) and her research on social networking technologies were recently featured in a UMN Brief article discussing how seed grants from the Office of Public Engagement are impacting University researchers.

"Seeds of change"
UMN Brief (Minn.) Nov. 7, 2007

Greenhow wins grant to hold seminars on online research ethics

GreenhowC-2007-Pref.jpgChris Greenhow, a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, was recently awarded an RCR Grant from the Office of the Vice President for Research to create two seminars on Internet research ethics:

  • Internet Research Ethics: Issues and Guidelines for Ethical Decision-making, February 2008

  • Internet Research Ethics: Strategies from the Field, March 2008
RCR grants are intended for the development and organization of learning activities on research/professional ethics topics.

Congratulations Chris!

October 23, 2007

Ornelas wins Milken National Educator Award

ornelas.jpgSharon Cormany Ornelas, CEHD professional practice school coordinator and alumna (M.Ed. ’00, second languages and cultures), recently received the Milken National Educator Award. Ornelas received the award at her school, Patrick Henry High School. The Milken Award provides public recognition and an unrestricted financial award of $25,000 to teachers, principals, and specialists who are furthering excellence in education. Read more at "Minneapolis teacher surprised with national honor" on WCCO.com.

October 10, 2007

Beach and O'Brien comment on literacy and technology

ObrienD-2002.jpgBeachR-2004.jpgIn a recent Independent Review article, curriculum and instruction professors David O'Brien (pictured right) and Richard Beach commented on how technology is changing children's reading and writing experiences.

October 3, 2007

Dubbels speaks at Games in Education symposium

Doctoral student Brock Dubbels (Curriculum and Instruction) was an invited speaker at the Games in Education symposium this summer. The conference, held on July 23 in Troy, New York, focused on the use of video games in education.

Dubbels: "Play games!"

Brock Dubbels, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, was featured in an article in the October 2007 edition of NEA Today. In the article, titled "Educators Got Game," Brock praises the use of video games to augment teaching practices. He also offers a list of useful educational games for teachers.

September 24, 2007

Greehow proposal receives funding

Postdoctoral associate Christine Greenhow (Curriculum and Instruction) recently submitted a proposal to convene a multidisciplinary research symposia on “Networks & Neighborhoods in Cyberspace: Exploring Implications for Education, Humanities, Government, Business and Technology" (with Dr. Ann Hill Duin, OIT and Dr. Joanna O’Connell, CLA). The proposal was one of three grant proposals selected for Phase 1 funding ($25,000) in the MN Futures Grant competition. The symposia will convene researchers from over 10 different disciplines and will be held in Winter 2008. Participants in Phase 1 funded symposia are then eligible to compete for Phase 2 funding of up to $250,000 per project. Contact Christine at greenhow@umn.edu for more information.

ISTE invites Greenhow

Christine Greenhow, a learning technologies postdoctoral associate in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, was recently invited to participate in the International Society of Teacher Education (ISTE) NETS Stakeholders Advisory Council. This 15-person council of representatives from education, business, and government will be working this year to generate a revised set of National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T).

August 1, 2007

Veletsianos: Recent publication

George Veletsianos, curriculum and instruction Ph.D. student, recently published the following article.

"Cognitive and Affective Benefits of an Animated Pedagogical Agent: Considering Contextual Relevance and Aesthetics." Journal of Educational Computing Research, 36(4).

Kimball discusses godparenting

Lisa Kimball, lecturer in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, discusses traditional and modern godparenting practices in this Robertson County Times article.

July 30, 2007

GoNorth! on KARE-11

AaronDoering.jpg
GoNorth!, the adventure learning program developed and managed by Assistant Professor Aaron Doering (Curriculum and Instruction), was recently featured not once, but twice on KARE-11. You can read about the program and view the two television clips here and here. And don't forget to submit your name for one of the newest members of the GoNorth! team: a one-month-old female husky pup!

July 9, 2007

Slettehaugh receives Archimedes award, certificate

Professor Emeritus Thomas Slettehaugh (Curriculum and Instruction) recently received the Archimedes Award from the International Biographical Centre in the United Kingdom. The award, which includes the Archimedes Medal of Honour and the Archimedes Certificate of High Achievement, honors Slettehaugh for his life science research on the creative intellect.

July 2, 2007

Dissertation award for CI alum

Amanda Thien, a 2005 graduate from the Department of Curriculum and Instruction, received a 2007 Promising Researcher Award from the National Council of Teachers of English. Thien, who completed her doctorate with CI Professor Richard Beach, is currently an assistant professor of English education at the University of Pittsburgh. Her dissertation is entitled, "She's not a prostitute!: Re-reading working-class girls' responses to literature through an examination of interpretive practices."

June 11, 2007

WPLC announces 2007 awards

WPLC.gif
Several members of the College community received awards from the Women's Philanthropic Leadership Circle (WPLC) this year:

  • Faculty/Staff award: Michelle Everson, Educational Psychology
  • Graduate student awards: Eva Lynn Boehm, Curriculum and Instruction; Julia Conkel, Educational Psychology; Kaoru Kinoshita, Educational Policy and Administration; and Kyoung-Ah Nam, Educational Policy and Administration.
  • Rising Star awards: Kristen McMaster, Educational Psychology; and Karen Miksch, Post Secondary Teaching and Learning.

The WPLC promotes networking, leadership, and involvement among women, through philanthropic efforts which result in the financial support of students, staff, and faculty in their scholarly pursuits.

May 30, 2007

New book and award nod for Lewis

LewisC-0000-Pref.jpg Professor Cynthia Lewis (curriculum and instruction) recently published a co-edited book. Reframing Sociocultural Research on Literacy: Identity, Agency, and Power articulates and develops the argument that new directions in sociocultural theory are needed in order to address important issues of identity, agency, and power that are central to understanding literacy research and literacy learning as social and cultural practices. The book has been nominated for the Edward Fry Book Award from the National Reading Conference. The award winner will be announced in November of 2007.

May 24, 2007

Doering keynotes at AERA

DoeringA-2003-Pref.jpg
Assistant Professor Aaron Doering (Curriculum and Instruction) gave the keynote speech at the meeting of the Computer and Internet Applications in Education Special Interest Group at the 2007 American Educational Research Association conference. The presentation, entitled "GoNorth! An American adventure goes global!" focused on his adventure learning programs.

Ngo co-edits book on anti-oppressive education

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Bic Ngo, assistant professor of curriculum and instruction, is co-editor of Six Lenses for Anti-Oppressive Education: Partial Stories, Improbable Conversations, recently published by Peter Lang Publishers. The book offers a variety of resources for elementary and secondary educators and teacher educators interested in exploring new and innovative ways to challenge racism, classism, sexism, heterosexism, and other forms of oppression in the classroom.

May 23, 2007

Doering receives dollars

DoeringA-2003-Pref[1].jpg
Aaron Doering, assistant professor of curriculum and instruction, received a $150,000 grant from the National Geographic Society for his project Learning Geography through Geospatial Technologies. Through this project, an online course will be developed on ways pre- and in-service K-16 teachers can effectively teach geography using a range of geospatial technologies. Although the course will be completely online, it will also be designed to be delivered in a hybrid (online and face-to-face) environment as well. Doering also received a $145,000 grant from the Best Buy Children’s Foundation for his adventure learning project, GoNorth! This grant supports the current phase of this program, GoNorth! Chukotka 2007, an adventure learning program focused on the region of Chukotka, Russia.