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October 26, 2010

Diversity Dialogues Present Jarrett Gupton

Postdoctoral Fellow Jarrett Gupton, Ph.D., explores the educational and life experiences of homeless students. His current research focuses on improving educational access, equity, and opportunity for those furthest on the margins.

Gupton, from the Department of Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Development, will address the ways in which homeless youth have come to define themselves and how they transverse educational systems to gain access to postsecondary education.

Date: 10/28/2010
Time: 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
Location: 48 Peik Hall
Cost: Free
Please bring a bag lunch if you like.

April 6, 2010

C&I Diversity Dialogues: Bryan Davis

"How do White High School Administrators Make Meaning of their Whiteness?"

Davis discusses how white high school administrators make meaning of their whiteness through interactions with students of color and staff of color; offers examples of racism disguised as school spirit, well intended promotions invalidating race as an issue in school, and honest conversations about race with high school students. Also: descriptions of white administrators personal and professional racial examples of confusion, perceived arrival, embarrassment, guilt and discovery.
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Bryan Davis is a PhD candidate, U of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and assistant principal for a large high school in Green Bay Wisconsin.
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Tuesday 4/13/2010
12:00 p.m. - 1 p.m.
40 Peik Hall
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Diversity Dialogues: monthly gatherings sponsored by the Department of Curriculum & Instruction. Each features a presentation by faculty, staff, student, or community members. Time is allotted for conversation.

November 10, 2009

Diversity Dialogues hosts Tim Lensmire 11/24: White Men's Racial Others

Timothy Lensmire

Diversity Dialogues hosts Tim Lensmire, associate professor in Curriculum and Instruction.

Tuesday 11/24/2009
12:00 p.m. - 1 p.m.
40 Peik Hall
Please bring a bag lunch if you like!

White Americans have, from the first, hopelessly confused the real Negroes and Indians, with whom they must for the sake of social survival and civil peace learn to live, with certain projections of their own deepest minds, aspects of their own psychic life with which precisely they find it impossible to live. —Leslie Fiedler

For the four white men who are the focus of this talk, the production of their own racial identities was intimately tied up with their relations to real and imagined racial others. I first share a theoretical framework that illuminates just how important racial others have been for the meaning- and self-making of white people throughout US history. Then, I discuss the larger interview study in which the four men participated, before turning to my interpretation of their interviews with me.

In the lives of these men, people of color, real and imagined, divided factions of families and churches against one another. People of color were integral to moral lessons they learned as boys—positive lessons about fairness and respect in athletics, negative lessons about hypocrisy (as they listened to their elders accuse Indians of drunkenness and stealing even as they watched these same white elders drink and steal). These men used people of color, imagined and real, to understand themselves and their powers—how smart they were, how good, how tough. People of color were integral to their efforts to find a place among the racist and democratic meanings and values of their community, society, and world.

Diversity Dialogues: monthly gatherings sponsored by the Department of Curriculum & Instruction. Each features a presentation by faculty, staff, student, or community members. Time is allotted for conversation.

October 9, 2009

Diversity Dialogue 10/29: Tom DiMaria of Creative Growth Studios

Tom DiMaria


Curriculum and Instruction
is pleased to host Tom DiMaria, executive director of Creative Growth Studios in Oakland, California, at October's Diversity Dialogue event on Thursday, October 29.

Time: 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Location: 325 Education Sciences Building

September 5, 2009

Diversity Dialogue 9/29: Race, Media, and Emotion in an Urban Classroom

Cynthia Lewis

Drawing on data from their year-long ethnographic study, Professor Cynthia Lewis, Ph.D. (Curriculum and Instruction) and Jessica Dockter explore the social politics of emotion in a diverse high school classroom where students analyzed and discussed racial representations in the media. The talk focuses on classroom discourse, students' perceptions, and students' media productions to show how emotion functioned to position students as critically engaged learners.
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Tuesday 9/29/2009
12:00 p.m. - 1 p.m.
40 Peik Hall
Please bring a bag lunch if you like!
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Diversity Dialogues are monthly gatherings sponsored by the Department of Curriculum & Instruction. Each features a presentation by faculty, staff, student, or community members. Time is allotted for conversation.