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July 13, 2011

Rise in stubbornness seen from governments to relationships

Steven HarrisInstant gratification through technology, isolation from other people due to being plugged in, and the rise of personalized and customized experiences have all contributed to a rise in "my way or the highway" stubbornness, according to family social science researchers. It can be seen on many relationship levels -- from couples in the home, to elected officials who butt heads as Minnesota's state government shutdown heads into its second week, with no clear end in sight.

This heels-dug-in attitude is us saying "I don't like how this is affecting me," says Dr. Steven Harris, director of the Marriage and Family Therapy Program at the University of Minnesota. In speaking to the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Harris cites a waning amount of interpersonal interaction as breaking down not only relationship skills, but conflict resolution.

Tai MendenhallDr. Tai Mendenhall, professor of family medicine and adjunct in family social science, says that the brain is wired to look for black or white, us-or-them solutions, and it can take outside perspective to bring in other ideas.

Harris says ultimately seeing the other side as "just being out to get you" won't lead to any kind of progress or solution. His advice to couples -- to try to see not only the other side, but also its integrity -- could be a good tip for governments as well.

June 13, 2011

How (not) to say 'I'm sorry'

William DohertyFamily social science professor William Doherty shared some thoughts recently on how high-profile figures like Anthony Weiner should (or should not) apologize for their behavior. "A mistake is turning the wrong way down a one-way street or forgetting to get an anniversary present," Doherty said in "Better safe than sorry" in the Minneapolis Star Tribune. "A pattern of online relationships with multiple women requires more than 'I regret my mistakes, and I know I've hurt you.'"

The article captures the opinions of Doherty and two other local experts on the recent stories of celebrity missteps and subsequent mea culpas, including Weiner, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Gilbert Gottfried, Charlie Sheen, and Lindsay Lohan.

May 19, 2011

Media attention for ADAPT, supporting Guard, Reserve families

After Deployment Adaptive Parenting Tools (ADAPT), led by family social science/child development associate professor Abi Gewirtz and project manager Laurel Bidwell, is gaining attention in the news as the Minnesota National Guard prepares for its second-largest deployment since World War II. The project, which examines the effectiveness of an evidence-based parenting intervention modified for families in the National Guard and Reserves, is featured in the May 19 Star Tribune and on WCCO-TV, KSTP-TV, and KSAX-TV. The University of Minnesota home page also features ADAPT.

The goal of ADAPT is to equip parents--and by extension, their families--with the best tools possible as they face deployment and then family reintegration. Gewirtz and Bidwell are recruiting 400 Minnesota National Guard and Reserve families over the next five years. Participants must have returned from deployment within recent years and have at least one child in the home between the ages of 5 and 12. Families will be randomly assigned to one of two groups--one that receives standard parenting literature and another that participates in a 14-week session with facilitated groups and web-enhanced components.

Eligible families can sign up on the ADAPT site.


May 13, 2011

Family social science experts featured in the Star Tribune

William DohertyPaul RosenblattProfessors Paul Rosenblatt and William Doherty, both renowned researchers on family issues, were noted for their expertise in the Minneapolis Star Tribune recently. Rosenblatt, who is retiring after more than 42 years of teaching and research in the Department of Family Social Science, is the subject of a column by Gail Rosenblum titled "'Retired' hardly describes U prof who's charting his next chapter." Doherty is quoted extensively in a front-page story on the decline in number of married couples in the Twin Cities area.

For more than 50 years, Rosenblatt has studied all sorts of challenges facing families, including loss and grief, rural family issues, multi-racial and cultural diversity barriers, and how government and corporate policies affect families. Most recently, his book Two in a Bed: The Social System of Couple Bed Sharing created world-wide interest, including more than 170 media requests.

Doherty and Rosenblatt share interests in family issues related to the growing number of multi-generational households, increased pressures on marriages, and the declines in marriage and family size. In the Star Tribune story on marriage decline, Doherty says, "People do value marriage, but it's more like an ideal, not a necessity....You don't have to be married to be seen as an adult now. Before, a 30-something unmarried guy was passed over for a management position, and a 30-something unmarried woman was a spinster who was seen as living a depleted life."

April 29, 2011

Innovative program builds parenting skills of returning soldiers' families

GewirtzA-2007.jpgFamily social science professor Abi Gewirtz is leading a first of its kind parenting study with Minnesota National Guard families to strengthen parenting skills of returning soldiers and their families. Funded by a $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the five-year study is designed to help people parent effectively despite the difficulties of deployment.

ADAPT (After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools) will recruit 400 families with kids between the ages of 5 and 12 to test the program's effectiveness over time. ADAPT is based on the Oregon Parent Management Training program. "It's a parenting intervention that has been shown to be very, very effective at supporting parenting in other contexts, so our test is to see whether it works at promoting children's resilience in this context," said Gewirtz in a recent Minnesota Public Radio story.

Research has shown that the period when soldiers return from combat is often the most stressful for military families, which is when families will be enrolled in the study. "The effects of deployment on kids are not ... just about combat stress symptoms that the soldier might be experiencing, but they are about the fact that the parent was gone for a year in the child's life," said Gewirtz on MPR.

Gewirtz and college researchers will be recruiting the first 100 families for the program beginning this spring.

Listen to the MPR story:

April 25, 2011

McCulloch delivers annual Hinsz Lecture at NDSU

McCullochJ-2006.jpgDr. Jan McCulloch, professor and department head of Family Social Science, delivered the annual Gertrude Weigum Hinsz Lecture at North Dakota State University on Friday, April 15, 2011.

The lecture series, sponsored by the the department of Human Development and Family Science at NDSU, featured Dr. McCulloch's research involving the health of older women living in rural settings. An abstract of her lecture and a podcast recording are available on the HDFS website.

April 8, 2011

Gewirtz gives tips on talking with children about disasters

Abigail Gewirtz, associate professor of Family Social Science, joined the morning show hosts on KARE 11 to share tips about talking with children about disasters, both natural and man-made.

"It's hard to switch yourself off from all of the media coming [to us]," Gewirtz said, "It's hard to cut it off." She stressed the importance of simply listening to children, and letting them talk about their concerns or worries instead of trying to guess how they are feeling.

Reassuring them with time and with affirmations that they are loved are also important.

">Watch more tips from Gewirtz or visit the KARE 11 site.

February 16, 2011

Undergrad research in family social science

Veronica Deenanath and Zha Blong Xiong Student Veronica Deenanath is learning the ins and outs of research and publishing by assisting associate professor Zha Blong Xiong (family social science) as an undergraduate. Find out more about their photovoice project involving Hmong youth and their concepts of home and family in "Early Investigations."

The story is included in the Winter 2011 issue of Connect.

January 24, 2011

Gewirtz weighs in on parenting and 'Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother'

Abi Gewirtz, assistant professor in the Department of Family Social Science, spoke with the Los Angeles Times about parenting and Amy Chua's controversial memoir, "Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother." "Battle Hymn" describes "Chinese parenting" techniques that, as Chua says, would seem "legally actionable" to many Westerners, but have granted her daughters great success.

Gewirtz agrees that setting challenging goals for children is crucial, but expectations need to be reasonably tailored to each child. "If you push a kid to do well, and they're good at it, they benefit," she says, "[but] not every kid can be at the top of the class."

Read more from professor Gewirtz and the book at the LA Times
.

January 6, 2011

Zuiker elected to AFCPE Board of Directors

Virginia Zuiker, associate professor and director of graduate studies in Family Social Science, was elected to the Board of Directors for the Association for Financial Counseling, Planning, and Education (AFCPE). She begins her three year term in January of 2011.

Zuiker was also awarded the Scholarship Award by the Minnesota Association of Extension Educators (MAEE) fo her co-authorship of "Financial Literacy of College Students: Understanding Student Interests in Technology."

U.S. News names marriage and family therapy one of '50 best career moves'

With more than 1.8 million people receiving treatment from marriage and family therapists, the field was picked by U.S. News and World Report as one of the 50 best career moves in 2011, and one with high promise for growth in the next decade.

The review cites an increasing acceptance of the field, which encourages people in need to seek out counseling, as a main indicator for growth. Employment in the field is expected to rise 14 percent from 2008 to 2018, according to the Labor Department.

For more information, see U.S. News' report here.

December 15, 2010

Gewirtz's work with military families highlighted in UM Moment

The current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan impact more than just those deployed--they also affect their families. Department of Family Social Science professor Abigail Gewirtz recently received a $3.2 million grant to develop a web-based training program that will help the families of troops better adjust to life back home. Gewirtz says the training program will target the families of National Guard members. For more information, listen to the U of M Moment.

December 14, 2010

CEHD students win Scholarly Excellence in Equity & Diversity awards

Vue.jpgHynes.jpgDiggles.jpgThree CEHD students were among the 2010 Scholarly Excellence in Equity and Diversity (SEED) award winners announced in November. Kimberly Diggles, Ph.D. student in marriage and family therapy (family social science); Kevin Hynes, senior in family social science; and Bai Vue, senior in human resource development were honored at a University ceremony for their outstanding work on issues of equity, diversity, and social justice in the classroom and in the community.

Diggles is a recipient of an American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Fellowship. She is a former McNair Scholar and has research interests in racial and cultural socialization in minority families.

Hynes is majoring in psychology as well as family social science. He has worked on adoption research and cites his own adopted person status and Korean birth culture as contributors to his deep interest and understanding of cultural diversity.

Vue, in addition to his human resource development major, has minors in leadership and human resource industrial relations. He is the education co-chair for the Hmong Minnesota Student Association and has been a McNair Scholar and Multicultural Kickoff Ambassador.

For more details on the awards and a video of the 2010 SEED award winners, see the Equity and Diversity website.

November 17, 2010

Who initiates divorce, men or women? Doherty speaks to WCCO News

William DohertyAs part of WCCO news' "Good Question" series, reporter Jason DeRusha asked "Who initiates more divorces, men or women?" In addition to gathering comments and answers from the public on his blog, DeRusha spoke to family social science professor Bill Doherty, a national expert on marriage.

"Women are twice as likely to initiate a divorce as men," said Doherty, and women ask for two out of every three divorces. Women are more likely to analyze the state of their relationships; "for women, it's not about just being married, it's about the quality of the marriage."

Watch the video of the Good Question segment and read more of Professor Doherty's thoughts at WCCO's website.

November 4, 2010

Doherty talks in Psychology Today about unhappiness in marriage

William Doherty
Family social science professor Bill Doherty spoke to Psychology Today about how couples' expectations of marriage -- and what they feel they "should" be getting -- can affect the health of the relationship and often lead to divorce.

Doherty speaks to the idea of entitlement in American consumer culture, and how that can translate to marital problems. "We believe in our inalienable right to the intimate relationships of our choice," says Doherty. "[People] badger their partners to change, convince themselves nothing will budge, and so work their way out of really good relationships."

November 3, 2010

Gewirtz receives $3.2 million grant from National Institute on Drug Abuse

Abigail Gewirtz
Researchers at the University of Minnesota and the Minneapolis VA received a $3.2 million grant award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to develop and test a web-enhanced parenting program for families with parents returning from deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan.

The program, "After Deployment, Adaptive Parenting Tools/ADAPT" is based on Oregon Parent Management Training, a well-validated parenting intervention. Over the 5-year grant period, researchers will work closely with MN Army National Guard (MNARNG) personnel, to develop and test the parenting program among 400 MNARNG families in which at least one parent has been deployed. Earlier research led by one of the project's co-investigators, Dr. Melissa Polusny, showed that worries about family were an important predictor of soldier wellbeing during deployment, and that effective parenting during the period of reintegration was diminished among soldiers suffering from symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder.

Dr. Abigail Gewirtz, assistant professor of Family Social Science and the project's Principal Investigator notes that, "This program builds on the considerable strengths of military families, the success of prior research among our investigative team, and our strong collaboration with the MN ARNG and its nationally recognized Beyond the Yellow Ribbon reintegration campaign. This is the first National Institutes of Health-funded study that we know of to specifically address deployment-related parenting challenges and child resilience among National Guard families. We are very pleased to have the opportunity to work to support the families of our nation's military."

Xiaohui (Sophie) Li awarded Goebel-Macklin Award

Family Social Science graduate student Xiaohui (Sophie) Li was awarded the Goebel-Macklin Award at the 2010 Groves Conference on Marriage and Family in Seattle, Washington.

The award supports a promising graduate student who presents at the annual conference. Li gave a presentation entitled "Asian Perspectives on Human-Animal Connections," and presented a poster entitled "Chinese and Americans: Boundaries in Couple Relationships."

June 17, 2010

Cell phone use while driving poses risks to close relationships

Paul RosenblattThough the hazards of distracted driving while talking on a cell phone have been a key focus in road safety discussions, Professor Paul Rosenblatt believes that the same distractions can also harm close relationships.

In his recently published article in the journal Family Science Review, co-authored with graduate student Xiaohui Li, Rosenblatt examines factors that make driving while on a cell phone dangerous, such as longer reaction times and impaired attention, and can also make communication difficult.

"A delay in the conversation could be a problem if the person (spouse or partner) on the other end of the conversation interprets the delayed reaction as an indicator of ambivalence, of not having a ready answer, or of hiding something. This all leads to upsetting the partner," Rosenblatt says.

Drivers can miss important points of the conversation while their attention is split between the phone and the road, leading the person on the other end of the call to become frustrated in repeating things. The caller may also become concerned for the driver's safety and end the conversation early, which could cause annoyance for the driver.

While most relationships can weather a difficult phone call and easily resolve communication road bumps, for couples in which things have been so difficult that they both are considering ending the relationship, problems arising from a difficult phone conversation may push their relationship to the tipping point," says Rosenblatt.

Read the full journal article: "Hazards to Family Relationships from Cell Phone Usage While Driving". The article has also received local and national media attention, including Fox 9 News, the Los Angeles Times and the ScienceBlog.

May 24, 2010

Amanda Matzek wins Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship

Amanda Matzek, Ph.D. candidate in Family Social Science, has been awarded a Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship from the Graduate School for 2010-2011. The prestigious fellowship is intended to enable Ph.D. candidates of particular promise to devote full-time effort to the research and writing of the dissertation during 2010-11 academic year.

May 3, 2010

Doherty to parents of teens: tough love required

DohertyB2002.jpgProfessor Bill Doherty, of the Department of Family Social Science, offered advice to parents of teens, following a deadly weekend on Minnesota roads that claimed six young lives. Speaking to the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Doherty cautions against "wishy-washy" parenting, stating that parents must establish firm expectations of teens, putting parenting duties ahead of friendship with their children.

"Many parents want to be buddies with their kids and don't want to come down too hard on them," Doherty said. "And many parents have this idea, 'Well, the kids are going to use alcohol anyway so why be the heavy, why talk about it that much?' What we know from the research is that teens who believe their parents are firmly against them drinking are less apt to drink. Our kids carry us in their brain and that's why [you need] a firm hand, that you're too young to drink and it's not acceptable to me as your parent that you drink at all, let alone drink and drive."

Seohee Son's dissertation featured at research showcase

Seohee Son, Ph.D. student in Family Social Science, had her doctoral research featured at the 2010 Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship Research Showcase. The event, held on April 6, 2010, was hosted by the Graduate School, and honored research from across the University.

Son's dissertation, "Korean Divorced Mothers' Experiences of Parenting After Divorce," focuses on both the increase in divorce and the lack of research on the effects of divorce on families in Korea. Son interviewed seventeen mothers, who have divorced within five years and have raised at least one minor child, in order to explore their experiences of parenting after divorce.

April 14, 2010

Professor champions bill to support couples considering divorce alternatives

DohertyB2002.jpgProfessor Bill Doherty, Department of Family Social Science, is championing a legislative bill that would provide better counseling support to couples considering divorce. Minnesota Public Radio interviewed Doherty about his support for the Couples on the Brink bill.

The bill would add a $5 tax to marriage licenses in Minnesota, and use the money to provide better training to marriage counselors and clergy who assist couples, especially those wavering between divorce and reconciliation.

Doherty's research, which surveyed over 2,400 divorcing parents in 2008 and 2009, is cited, showing that in about one third of the cases, one party was unsure about proceeding with the divorce.

March 2, 2010

Care connection: providing support for those dealing with dementia

Cynthia MeyerFollowing the unexpected passing of Wayne Caron, Ph.D. assistant professor in the Department of Family Social Science in 2007, faculty scrambled to keep a vibrant program he had established in 1999 functioning. Cynthia Meyer, Ph.D. and Liz Wieling, Ph.D., both from the Family Social Science Department have helped maintain the Family Caregiving Center that now bears Caron's name.

The Wayne Caron Family Caregiving Center supports people with dementia and those who care for them. According to Meyer, there is nothing like it in the Twin Cities. Most of those served by the center are referred by University of Minnesota Physicians, Dementia and Memory Disorders Clinic, the Alzheimer's Association, local therapists, or through word-of-mouth.

One of the primary services offered by the Wayne Caron Family Caregiving Center is a free Saturday morning group support group. On average, 20 to 30 people attend each week. Some have dementia and others are their caregivers. The first hour of the Saturday group is instructive and is typically led by graduate students from Family Social Science. These students as well as interns and undergraduate students volunteer under supervision of Meyer and others. While Meyer had worked with caregivers in the past, she says she has developed a new found passion for issues faced by families dealing with dementia as a result of her work with this program.

Learn more about services provided by Wayne Caron Family Caregiving Center.

Star Tribune quotes Doherty in story on divorce and children

doherty2002.jpgWilliam Doherty, professor in the Department of Family Social Science , was interviewed for a Minneapolis Star Tribune Sunday feature: "When to stay together for the children -- or not."

January 11, 2010

Danes: Families focusing on what they have, not what they don't

danes-web-09.jpgSharon Danes, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Family Social Science, was quoted in a Parade magazine article "Live Well With What You Have." She noted that as American families have struggled in the economic downturn, they have had to reassess spending habits. More people have chosen to appreciate what they have, instead of wanting more. Read the article.

January 5, 2010

Rosenblatt sees increased family togetherness in next decade

rosenblattP2008.jpgFamily Social Science Professor Paul Rosenblatt was interviewed for a Minneapolis StarTribune article about trends in the next decade. He predicted more family togetherness, more communal living, more work from home, fewer babies and more marriage therapists. Read the full story.

December 3, 2009

Bush Foundation commits $4.5M for TERI

The Bush Foundation has committed up to $4.5 million to support the University of Minnesota as it restructures teacher preparation programs in the College of Education and Human Development. The Bush Foundation today announced a total of seven partnerships, which include 14 higher-education institutions, focused on transforming teacher-preparation programs in Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota.

Through ongoing collaboration with K-12 schools, the college's Teacher Education Redesign Initiative (TERI) will have a long-lasting, positive impact on the children of Minnesota, new teachers and programs within the college. Improved partnerships with K-12 districts are designed to benefit the university, district and prospective teachers.

Teachers prepared through TERI will strongly focus on student learning and have the ability to adapt to the needs of all learners. The university will diversify its teaching candidate pool and provide pathways into its teacher preparation programs for both exceptionally qualified undergraduate students and for career changers.

The first group of prospective teachers will enter the redesigned program during summer 2011.

Read the press release

October 26, 2009

Learning Abroad: Northern Ireland

northern-ireland.jpgThe School of Social Work is offering a learning abroad opportunity. If you are interested, please come to one of our information sessions:

Monday, Nov 2 @ 12:45-1:15PM in Undergrad Lounge in Peters Hall.

Tuesday, Nov 3 @ 2:30-3PM in Undergrad Lounge in Peters Hall.

For more information, contact: Ross Velure Roholt 612-624-8785

September 25, 2009

Iraqi visitors to present at Water for Peace symposium, Sept. 30

Experts and community leaders from the University of Kufa, located in Najaf, Iraq, will join University of Minnesota faculty for a symposium on the importance of clean water for health, education, and public life. The public symposium, titled Water for Peace: An Iraqi-U.S. Partnership, will be held Wednesday, Sept. 30 from 2-4:30 p.m. in Room 64 of the University of Minnesota Biological Sciences Building, 1455 Gortner Ave., St. Paul.

This program brings together a multi-disciplinary panel of speakers to discuss the impact of clean water on many dimensions of civic life and how a bilateral community organizing effort can mobilize citizens to impact community health issues. The panel will be followed by small group discussions with Iraqi community leaders.

A delegation of 12 Iraqi scholars and civic leaders arrived in Minnesota Sept. 12 for the first official exchange in a new sister city relationship between Najaf and Minneapolis. The University has played a vital role in the ongoing partnership and future collaborations are expected. The Iraqis have spent their time in Minnesota exploring opportunities for future partnerships with faculty at the U of M and seeing sights around the Twin Cities and the state.

According to a recent report by the United Nations, lack of access to clean water poses a significant threat to the health of Iraqi children. In the province of Najaf, 100 miles south of Baghdad, a unique partnership has developed to help meet the challenge of providing clean water at schools, hospitals, and clinics. An Iraqi NGO, the Muslim Peacemaker Teams, has partnered with a Minnesota non-profit, the Iraqi and American Reconciliation Project, to install water filtration systems in important public sites in Najaf.

The Water for Peace symposium is sponsored by the Iraqi and American Reconciliation Project, the Muslim Peacemaker Teams, and U of M's Department of Family Social Science, College of Education and Human Development and Office of International Programs.

September 16, 2009

Learn about master's degree programs

The Family Social Science Roundtable is sponsoring a discussion with Tracy Templin, assistant director of admissions for the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. She will provide undergraduates with information about the school's master's degree programs in social work and public health.

September 8, 2009

Solheim quoted on student financial management

Catherine SolheimCatherine Solheim, Ph.D., associate professor in Family Social Science, was featured in a Minneapolis StarTribune article about teaching college students how to stay out of financial trouble. Solheim teaches a course called Personal and Family Finances, which looks at the impact of financial management on individuals' and families' quality of life. Read the StarTribune article.

August 24, 2009

Khoury named to Alzheimer's Expert Team

Faten Khoury, director of clinical services in the Wayne Caron Family Caregiving Center at the University, has been selected by the Minnesota Board on Aging to serve on an Expert Team in support of the Alzheimer's Disease Working Group process. The working group was mandated by the state Legislature to examine the needs of individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's and to determine whether the state and current providers have the capacity to meet those needs. In addition to her work in the Caregiving Center, Khoury is a doctoral student in Family Social Science.

August 12, 2009

FSoS student elected to Gerontological Society post

MatzekAmanda.jpgFamily Social Science Ph.D. student Amanda Matzek was elected secretary of the Gerontological Society of America's Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization. The society, the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to aging, created the emerging scholar organization in 1960 to provide students with an opportunity to be players in the field of gerontology. Over the years, the student leadership has had a role in the development of programs and activities, helping to stimulate the development of student awards and establishing a mentorship program to link students with seasoned professionals. In 1995, the Emerging Scholar and Professional Organization helped launch the society's Campus Ambassador Program, designed to establish a professional/social network on every campus where there is, or should be, an active gerontology curriculum. Amanda and the society's other new officers will officially take their positions at GSA's 2009 Annual Scientific Meeting, November 18-22 in Atlanta, Georgia.

August 7, 2009

Rosenblatt's new book explores 'shared obliviousness'

rosenblattP2008.jpgPaul Rosenblatt, Ph.D., Family Social Science professor, has published a new book Shared Obliviousness in Family Systems. Rosenblatt defines "shared obliviousness" as the state of being unmindful or unaware of something, and in a family setting, it means that all family members distance themselves from information they could--and maybe should--be conscious of. For more information, read the UMNews article or hear the Minnesota Moment podcast by clicking below.









August 5, 2009

Solheim: Job loss can take toll on parent-child communication

Catherine SolheimCatherine Solheim, Ph.D., associate professor in Family Social Science, spoke with Minnesota Public Radio about family communication after parents have lost their jobs. "When you bring in a really stressful, anxiety-producing situation, like lack of finances, and there's worry all the time, it's very easy to slip into an unconscious mode where you're not thinking all the time, 'what am I portraying?' " Read "Families Struggle to Take Away Lessons from Recession."

August 3, 2009

Hoy, Boss quoted in article about bridge collapse

Two University of Minnesota faculty members were quoted in a St. Paul Pioneer Press article about the two-year anniversary of the I-35W bridge collapse. Judy Hoy, a clinical social worker and community faculty member in the School of Social Work, is working with two families that were affected by the bridge collapse. She noted that, in the second year after a traumatic event, "there is an expectation that people 'get over it' ... but most people can't." Pauline Boss, professor emeritus in the Family Social Science Department and a therapist in private practice, advised that "the community needs to be patient and listen to these people's stories, even if it is two, three, five years later. Often they can't put it aside unless someone hears it." Read the full article.

July 28, 2009

Professor Emeritus James Maddock dies

maddockjim.jpgFamily Social Science Professor Emeritus James Maddock died of cancer on July 18 at age 67. Dr. Maddock worked at the University of Minnesota for 36 years. He was a founder of the University of Minnesota Medical School Program in Human Sexuality, former president of the American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists, and co-founder, with his wife, Noel Larson, of Meta Resources Psychotherapy and Training Institute in St. Paul. A celebration of his life will be held on Sunday, August 16, 2 p.m., in the atrium of McNeal Hall on the St. Paul campus. Memorials are preferred; contributions may be made to the University of Minnesota Foundation with a notation designating the contribution to the Department of Family Social Science Neubeck Scholarship Fund (Fund # 2191). More information is available at his Caring Bridge Web site.

July 16, 2009

Doherty: Adult kids moving home not all bad

doherty2002.jpgWilliam Doherty, Ph.D., professor in the Family Social Science department at the University of Minnesota, was interviewed for a Kare11 story on "boomerang kids."

July 15, 2009

Danes: Family businesses more likely to survive recessions

danes-web-09.jpgFamily businesses in general have better chances of making it through recessions than other businesses, according to Sharon Danes, a Family Social Science professor who specializes in family business. The StarTribune quoted Danes in an article about the large number of family teams in the real estate industry. Read the article.

June 23, 2009

Guthrie play draws on expertise from Wayne Caron Caregiving Center

"My Father's Bookshelf," a new play at the Guthrie Theater, used researchers from the University of Minnesota and the Wayne Caron Family Caregiving Center in Family Social Science, to develop a performance piece that educates as much as it entertains. Read the article in UMNews, or listen on the Minnesota Public Radio Web site.

June 22, 2009

Relatives of airline crash victims suffer 'ambiguous loss'

Boss_Pauline.jpgIn a letter published in the New York Times, Pauline Boss, Ph.D., professor emeritus in the Department of Family Social Science, commented on the crash of Air France Flight 447. She noted that the families left with no body to bury suffer "ambiguous loss." Boss, who has written two books on ambiguous loss, noted, "The lack of closure causes families for many generations to ache for proof." Read the letter.

June 18, 2009

Gewirtz receives Rising Star award

Abi Gewirtz Abigail Gewirtz, Ph.D., assistant professor in Family Social Science and the Institute of Child Development, has received the Rising Star award for 2008-2009 from the Women's Philanthropic Leadership Circle. This award is given to a pre-tenure female faculty member in the College of Education and Human Development who has demonstrated leadership and creativity in an academic area as shown by research, teaching and service. Congratulations, Abi!

June 17, 2009

Students need to understand cost of living, Solheim says

Catherine SolheimCatherine Solheim, Ph.D., associate professor in Family Social Science, says one shortcoming of many high school and college students is that "most don't have good handle on what it costs them to live." In an article in Finance and Commerce, she talks about what she teaches students about managing their finances.

Read the full article: Personal finance tips for grads and other young folks.

June 16, 2009

Doherty calls for Obama to remember that ordinary people can tackle big problems

doherty2002.jpgWilliam Doherty, Ph.D., professor in the Family Social Science department at the University of Minnesota, wrote an editorial in the St. Paul Pioneer Press contending that President Obama seems to be forgetting his call for civic engagement by ordinary people. Doherty and co-author Albert Dzur contend that "the administration seems poised to take the road most commonly traveled in health care and alleviating social problems. Instead of 'we the people' tackling problems together, it's starting to look like a version of 'we the experts' leading the masses." Read the full editorial.

June 1, 2009

Helping at-risk families attain stability

Bill DohertyA five-year project aimed at helping at-risk families attain long-term stability against often formidable odds came to an end on May 30. The project, directed by Bill Doherty, Ph.D., Family Social Science professor, was featured in an article in the Star Tribune. The federally and state-funded "Minnesota Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Initiative" studied unmarried couples with children. The goal was to help the couples develop the skills to keep their families intact. Read more in the Star Tribune.

May 18, 2009

Seohee Son receives dissertation fellowship

Seohee Son Seohee Son, Ph.D. candidate in Family Social Science is the recipient of a 2009-10 Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship from the Graduate School. The fellowship is intended to enable Ph.D. candidates of particular promise to devote full-time effort to the research and writing of the dissertation during 2009-10.

May 12, 2009

Doherty featured in WCCO TV story

William DohertyComments by William Doherty, Ph.D., Family Social Science professor, were featured in a WCCO TV report called "Should Parents Stay Together for the Kids?" He feels strongly that couples should get help in repairing their marriages rather than ending them. View the WCCO report.

April 21, 2009

Harris to head Marriage and Family Therapy program

Steven HarrisFamily Social Science is delighted to welcome Steven M. Harris, Ph.D., LMFT, to our department. Harris has been appointed as professor in the department and will serve as director of the Marriage and Family Therapy graduate program beginning in August.

March 13, 2009

Until the economy improves

Ann Person, Family Social Science student, is interviewed talking about her future in our current economic climate. Read the full story.
Star Tribune, MN

March 9, 2009

Economic crisis can be trying times for families

The economic crisis has put many families under unbelievable stress right now. KARE 11's Julie Nelson sat down with Catherine Solheim, Ph.D. University of Minnesota Department of Family Social Science to talk about family dynamics to talk about how to handle all that stress in your home.

Click here for tips on how to lower your stress.

March 4, 2009

Kids and the economy

You can always count on kids to ask the tough questions, and these days kids probably have many questions about the economy. University of Minnesota Family Social Science Professor, Catherine Solheim joined TCL with some popular children’s books that can make economy talk with your kids easier on the whole family!
Watch the Twin Cities Live interview.

The 2009 President’s Student Leadership & Service Award (PSLSA) was awarded to FSoS majors: Annie Johnson and Lucia Yess. Each year, this award recognizes the accomplishments and contributions made by outstanding student leaders. It is presented to approximately one-half of one percent of the student body for their exceptional leadership and service to the University of Minnesota and the surrounding community.

This award is presented to approximately one-half of one percent of the student body for their exceptional leadership and service to the University of Minnesota and the surrounding community. Awards will be presented at the President's Award Banquet taking place on May 4th, 2009 in the Great Hall of Coffman Union.

March 3, 2009

Reaching out to younger students

Colleges used to wait until students were in high school before talking to them about higher education. But these days Minnesota colleges are reaching out to students in middle school and even elementary classrooms, to encourage them to prepare for college. Sheena Thao, an outreach specialist at the University of Minnesota, as well as a Family Social Science student, spends the afternoon in a U of M classroom talking with a group of students from a charter school in Minneapolis. Listen to the full MPR report.

February 18, 2009

Explaining family finances to your kids

Jean Bauer, Ph.D. a family economist at the University of Minnesota in the department of Family Social Science was interviewed by Fox news. Dr. Bauer advises parents to talk honestly with thier children, "You can take this opportunity to help them grow and develop. They're going to know something is going on if you're feeling bad about the economy or something with your job or the house."

February 12, 2009

FSoS professor, graduate student, and staff win National Award

Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship John Jack Award
Family Social Science professor Sharon M. Danes, graduate student Jinhee Lee, and staff member Sayali Amarapurkar’s paper titled “Determinants of Family Business Resilience after a Natural Disaster? was awarded the John Jack Award, selected by the Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship (JDE). The John Jack Award is presented to the overall best paper presented at the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE) Annual Conference dealing with entrepreneurship by women or minorities or under conditions of adversity. As leaders in their fields, the award winners are making an impact on government policy and on the development of small business and entrepreneurship.

The John Jack Award is accompanied by a cash prize and will be presented by JDE editor during the 2009 23rd Annual Conference of the USASBE on January 10th, 2009 in Anaheim, California.

The International Council for Small Business (ICSB) was founded in 1957 in the United States as a comprehensive organization of outstanding researchers, scholars, teachers, administrators, and public policy makers interested in entrepreneurship and small business. As the organization grew, members decided to form national affiliates, and the U. S. Affiliate of the ICSB was established in 1981. In 1985, the name was changed to the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE). USASBE is an eclectic group of government officials, directors of small business development centers, and academics in fields like finance, marketing, management, and economics united by their common interest in entrepreneurship and small business.

February 10, 2009

Formatting your dissertation

This spring semester Magrath Library is offering a suite of new workshops, including: Formatting Your Dissertation in Word 2007, RefWorks Basics, Extreme Googling: Collaboration Tools, Some Rights Reserved: An Introduction to Creative Commons, Google for Researchers, SciFinder - Web Access to Chemical Abstracts, and many others. For more information and to register, visit: http://www.lib.umn.edu/registration/

January 20, 2009

First Worldwide Therapists’ Leadership Virtual Conference

Bill Doherty, Ph.D. professor in the Department of Family Social Science at the University of Minnesota is presenting at the First Worldwide Therapists’ Leadership Virtual Conference with a special emphasis on Leading Edge Issues, Trends and Practice Building. This is a rare opportunity to listen and connect with 14 of the most important and dynamic thought leaders of our time. Attend a conference and listen live to the great thinkers in psychotherapy today – all without leaving your home or work April 20-24, 2009.

January 12, 2009

Teaming up to deliver specialized care

The University of Minnesota’s School of Dentistry and pediatric specialists at the University of Minnesota Children’s Hospital, Fairview recently joined forces to offer interdisciplinary care for children with Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), the most common syndrome associated with cleft palates. Anna Thurmes, Ph.D. student in the Family Social Science Department, is completing her dissertation on the psychosocial impact of VCFS on families.

Now, under one roof, specialists in cardiology, genetics, rheumatology/immunology, psychiatry, plastic surgery, speech-language pathology, otolaryngology, audiology, nursing, and dentistry have formed an integrated team that provides care for patients at the Cleft Palate and Craniofacial Clinics. More on VCFS

December 30, 2008

Doherty comments on 2009: The next big things

Family Togetherness Will Keep Growing
William Doherty, Ph.D., professor in the Family Social Science department at the University of Minnesota contributed to the Minneapolis Star Tribute's article on 2009: The next big things. Doherty said "This generation aspires to less independence. The upside of helicopter parenting is that these folks feel closer emotionally to each other."
Star Tribune (Minn.) Dec. 29, 2008

Family togetherness keeps growing

William Doherty, Ph.D., professor in the Family Social Science department at the University of Minnesota contributed to the Minneapolis Star Tribute's article on 2009: The next big things. Doherty said "This generation aspires to less independence. The upside of helicopter parenting is that these folks feel closer emotionally to each other."
Star Tribune (Minn.) Dec. 29, 2008

December 15, 2008

National Council on Family Relations honors Rosenblatt

rosenblattP2008.jpg

Paul Rosenblatt, U of MN professor in the Department of Family Social Science, has been honored by the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) as a new fellow.

NCFR is the primary academic organization in Rosenblatt's field, and he has been a member since 1970. He is the cofounder and first co-chair of the Rural Families Focus Group and founder and first chair of the Grief and Families Focus Group. Rosenblatt has also been involved in the Ethnic Minorities Section, the Education and Enrichment Section, the Feminism and Family Studies Section, and the Qualitative Family Research Network.

Fellowship status in NCFR is an honor awarded to relatively few members of NCFR who have made outstanding and enduring contributions to the field of the family in the areas of scholarship, teaching, outreach or professional service, including service to NCFR. By definition, outstanding contributions are those that have had a broad impact on the field and are enduring over time. These contributions occur infrequently. No more than 1% of the number of members in NCFR will be awarded fellowship status in one year.

Founded in 1938, NCFR provides an educational forum for family researchers, educators and practitioners to share in the development and dissemination of knowledge about families and family relationships, establishes professional standards and works to promote family well-being.

December 10, 2008

Turner: Recent presentations

Family social science professor William Turner delivered the keynote address to the New Mexico Medical Society Annual Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico on December 6, 2008.

The title of his talk was "An Agenda to Improve America's Health." In attendance were over 300 physicians, 12 New Mexico state legislators, and U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM). The meeting, held at the Hotel Albuquerque at Old Towne, was convened by New Mexico Medical Society President Daniel Derksen, MD.

William also gave a presentation on Friday, December 5, to the Robert Wood Johnson Center for Health Policy at the University of New Mexico. The title of that talk was "Building a Bridge between Social Science and Health Policy."

"Building a Bridge between Social Science and Health Policy"

On Friday, December 5, 2008, William Turner, Family Social Science professor, gave a presentation to the Robert Wood Johnson Center for Health Policy at the University of New Mexico. The title of his talk was "Building a Bridge between Social Science and Health Policy."

"An Agenda to Improve America's Health"

Family Social Science professor, William Turner, delivered the keynote address to the New Mexico Medical Society Annual Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico on December 6, 2008. The title of his talk was "An Agenda to Improve America's Health." In attendance were over 300 physicians, 12 New Mexico state legislators, and U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM). The meeting, held at the Hotel Albuquerque at Old Towne, was convened by New Mexico Medical Society President, Daniel Derksen, MD.

December 8, 2008

3101 Course Guide

Media Mill Video

December 3, 2008

Doherty gives advice to Obama

Professor Bill Doherty (Department of Family Social Science) recently wrote an editorial offering advice to President-Elect Obama.

Advice for Obama: Reinvent government as partner, not parent
Pioneer Press (Minn.) Nov. 26, 2008

Solheim: Don't sugarcoat household finances

Professor Cathy Solheim (Department of Family Social Science) is quoted in a recent Forbes article on how to talk to children about the economy.

How To Talk To Your Kids About The Economy
Forbes (N.Y.) Dec. 3, 2008

Don't sugarcoat household finances

Catherine Solheim is quoted the Forbes article How To Talk To Your Kids About The Economy.
Forbes Dec. 3, 2008

December 1, 2008

U.S. annual passion for shopping

Family Social Science professor, Bill Doherty, takes on the season for Americans to overspend, over schedule, and dwell in excess. A group of Minnesotans, led by Professor Doherty, is pushing back against the Black Friday tradition aiming to challenge the hyper over-consumption and frantic pace of life as the nation and world revs up for the holiday season.









Read the full press release about the group.

Economic struggles are no match for holiday shoppers
Minnesota Daily (Minn.) Nov. 30, 2008

Shop 'til you drop? This group says not
Star Tribune (Minn.) Nov. 28, 2008

Shades of Gray for Black Friday
CNBC Nov. 28, 2008

U of Minn. professor challenges Black Friday
Minnesota Public Radio (Minn.) Nov. 28, 2008

U prof takes on 'Black Friday' shopping mindset
Star Tribune (Minn.) Nov. 25, 2008

U professor pushes against Black Friday
Minnesota Daily (Minn.) Nov. 25, 2008

Church instead of shopping on Black Friday as parishioners reclaim the season
Kare 11 (Minn.)

November 26, 2008

Doherty fights hyper-consumption

The Black Friday Group, led by family social science professor Bill Doherty, aims to challenge the hyper over-consumption and frantic pace of life as the nation and world revs up for the holiday season.










Read the full press release about the group.

Shopping frenzy tramples right over the reason for the season
Star Tribune (Minn.) Dec. 1, 2008

Economic struggles are no match for holiday shoppers
Minnesota Daily (Minn.) Nov. 30, 2008

Shop 'til you drop? This group says not
Star Tribune (Minn.) Nov. 28, 2008

Shades of Gray for Black Friday
CNBC (N.J.) Nov. 28, 2008

U of Minn. professor challenges Black Friday
Minnesota Public Radio (Minn.) Nov. 28, 2008

Times are bad, but lessons can be good
Pioneer Press (Minn.) Nov. 28, 2008

U prof takes on 'Black Friday' shopping mindset
Star Tribune (Minn.) Nov. 25, 2008

U professor pushes against Black Friday
Minnesota Daily (Minn.) Nov. 25, 2008

Church instead of shopping on Black Friday as parishioners reclaim the season
KARE-11 (Minn.)

November 25, 2008

Black Friday shopping mindset

In a Star Tribune article Bill Doherty, professor of Family Social Science, says “We are all bombarded with messages to buy more and bigger, and we run ourselves ragged during the holidays. This Black Friday group is a laboratory for seeking more balance in all of our lives -- something that our society sorely needs in the midst of today's challenges."

Star Tribune (Minn.) Nov. 25, 2008

November 21, 2008

Danes and Haberman article named outstanding by AFCPE

Sharon Danes, professor and family economist, and teaching specialist Heather Haberman, both in the Department of Family Social Science, are recipients of the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education (AFCPE) Outstanding Research Journal Article of the Year designation for their article "Teen Financial Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Behavior: A Gendered View."
unfamiliar prior to the curriculum study.

A social constructionist perspective was taken to investigate gender differences in financial knowledge, self-efficacy and behavior of 5,329 high school students after studying a financial planning curriculum. Male teens tended to reinforce their existing knowledge, whereas female teens learned significantly more about finances in areas in which they were unfamiliar prior to the curriculum study.

The Outstanding Research Journal Article is chosen for its thorough and appropriate review of the topic addressed, employing solid research methodologies including sound operational definitions, appropriate measuring devices, and adequate statistical analyses. The winning paper provides creative and innovative approaches to using the information in practice.

AFCPE is a professional organization focused on supporting, promoting and advancing the field of financial counseling and planning education. Their membership consists of university and Cooperative Extension educators, military financial counselors, private practitioners, and interest organization and government officials.

Solheim: Be aware of how much you’re spending

In a Minnesota Daily article Cathy Solheim, associate professor of family social science, says "If you ask people how much it takes them to live for a month, most people underestimate."

Despite economic woes, student spending is steady
Minnesota Daily (Minn.) Nov. 19, 2008

Teen Financial Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Behavior: A Gendered View wins National award

Sharon M. Danes, Ph.D, Professor and Family Economist and Heather Haberman, Ph.D., Teaching Specialist at the University of Minnesota department of Family Social Science are recipients of the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education (AFCPE) Outstanding Research Journal Article of the Year for their article “Teen Financial Knowledge, Self-efficacy, and Behavior: A Gendered View. A social constructionist perspective was taken to investigate gender differences in financial knowledge, self-efficacy and behavior of 5,329 high school students after studying a financial planning curriculum. Male teens tended to reinforce their existing knowledge, whereas female teens learned significantly more about finances in areas in which they were unfamiliar prior to the curriculum study.

The Outstanding Research Journal Article is chosen for its thorough and appropriate review of the topic addressed, employing solid research methodologies including sound operational definitions, appropriate measuring devices, and adequate statistical analyses. The winning paper provides creative and innovative approaches to using the information in practice.

AFCPE is a professional organization focused on supporting, promoting and advancing the field of financial counseling and planning education. Our membership consists of university and Cooperative Extension educators, military financial counselors, private practitioners, and interest organization and government officials.

Be aware of how much you’re spending

In the Minnesota Daily article Catherine Solheim, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Family Social Science at the Univeristy of Minnesota says “If you ask people how much it takes them to live for a month, most people underestimate.?
Minnesota Daily - Minneapolis St. Paul (Minn). Nov. 19, 2008

November 20, 2008

Doherty quoted in article on vacations

Family social science professor Bill Doherty is quoted in an article on the importance of taking vacations, individually and as a family.

Peaceful revolution: Irritable growl syndrome
The Huffington Post (D.C.) Nov. 19, 2008

Doherty: Thanksgiving doesn’t have to be big production

In a Daily Journal article on Thanksgiving get-togethers, family social science professor Bill Doherty suggests going easy on mothers.

Thanksgiving, It doesn’t have to be a big production
Daily Journal (Minn.) Nov. 18, 2008

November 19, 2008

Thanksgiving doesn’t have to be a big production

A Daily Journal article on thanksgiving get-togethers, Bill Doherty, Ph.D. professor at the University of Minnesota department of Family social Science suggests "Go easy on mom: there is traditionally one person who is typically assigned to “take on the emotional and physical responsibility for the holiday�? and “actualize the cultural belief that the family is one big harmonious group.�? That person is usually mom. But no matter who it is in the family, that role shouldn’t be taken for granted.

The Daily Journal - International Falls. November 18, 2008 (Minn)

Doherty: Multigenerational families not new

Professor Bill Doherty (Department of Family Social Science) comments on the nationwide trend of parents living with an adult head of household.

Multigenerational living
Star Tribune (Minn.) Nov. 18, 2008

Living with mom and dad

William Doherty, Ph.D., professor at the Univeristy of Minnesota Family Social Science department was quoted in the Star Tribune article on Multigenerational Living.

Star Tribune - Minneapolis St. Paul (Minn) Nov. 19, 2008


November 13, 2008

Zuiker to chair AFCPA conference

Associate Professor Virginia Solis Zuiker (Department of Family Social Science) is the 2008 Conference Chair at the national conference for the Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education (AFCPA). The conference will take place in Orange County, CA from November 19-21, 2008.

November 12, 2008

Conference Chair at National Financial Counseling and Planning Education conference

Family Social Science Associate Professor Virginia Solis Zuiker, Ph.D. is the 2008 Conference Chair at the National conference for Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education (AFCPA) that takes place in Orange County, CA November 19-21, 2008.

Marriage counseling should not be a last resort

Jeff Vogel reviewed literature from Family Social Science Professor William Doherty, PhD. discovering Doherty believes that sometimes couples and counselors who work with couples give up too soon on relationships.

Marriage counseling should not be a last resort

Port Clinton News Herald (Ohio) Nov. 11, 2008

November 10, 2008

Yellow Pie Plate in article on inheritance planning

Professor Marlene Stum's Yellow Pie Plate project is mentioned in an article on inheritance planning.

Advance planning can preempt inheritance squabbles
Washington Times (D.C.) Nov. 9, 2008

Danes: Recent publications

Professor Sharon Danes (Department of Family Social Science) has recently published several co-authored papers.

  • Sharon M. Danes, Jinhee Lee, Kathryn Stafford, & Ramona Kay Zachary Heck (2008). The Effects of Ethnicity, Families and Culture on Entrepreneurial Experience: An Extension of Sustainable Family Business Theory. Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship, 13(3), 229–268. This is an invited paper for the journal's special issue titled “Empirical Research on Ethnicity and Entrepreneurship in the United States."
  • Danes, S.M., Lee, J., Stafford, K., Haynes, G., & Amarapurkar, S. (2009). Determinants of Family Business Resilience after a Natural Disaster. The 23rd Annual Conference of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship, January 8-11, 2009, Anaheim, California. This article is in research proceedings for publication.
  • Another paper written by Sharon, Jinhee Lee, and Sayali Amarapurkar has been accepted for presentation at the 2009 Annual Conference of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE) at the Hilton Anaheim in Anaheim, California, January 8-11, 2009.


Washington Times quotes Marlene Stum

Marlene Stum is quoted in the Washington Times article Advance planning can pre-empt inheritance squabbles. She talks about finding a way to help family members make informed decisions about inheritance issues and "Who Gets Grandma's Yellow Pie Plate?"

Infidelity and the 'hook-up' generation.

Bill Doherty is quoted in the St. Paul Pioneer Press Twincities.com article We cheat more, but that doesn't mean it hurts less

Doherty: Infidelity on the rise, but still considered bad

Family social science professor Bill Doherty comments on a recent survey noting a rise in infidelity.

We cheat more, but that doesn't mean it hurts less
Pioneer Press (Minn.) Nov. 7, 2008

October 30, 2008

Love Dare

Bill Doherty, is quoted in the October 30th USA Today article Dare to try this 'Love Dare' advice?

October 29, 2008

Teen Talk: Survival guide for parents of teens wins National award

Jodi Dworkin, Ph.D. FSoS faculty, Chris Gonzalez, FSoS graduate student, and Colleen Gengler and Kathleen Olson, Extension Educators, Family Relations are recipients of the National Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences Florence Hall Award, 2008 State Winner for their evaluation of a fact sheet series for parents of 7th and 8th graders - “Teen Talk: A survival guide for parents of teens.�?

Award for Dworkin, Gonzalez, and Extension colleagues

Associate Professor Jodi Dworkin, graduate student Chris Gonzalez (both in Family Social Science), and Colleen Gengler and Kathleen Olson, Extension educators, are recipients of the National Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences Florence Hall Award, 2008 State Winner for their evaluation of a fact sheet series for parents of 7th and 8th graders - "Teen Talk: A survival guide for parents of teens."

October 28, 2008

Doherty discusses marriage-friendly therapy

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) describes what he means by "marriage-friendly therapy" and why he and a colleague started a Web site, Marriage-Friendly Therapists, that offers couples experienced, marriage-friendly counselors.

Koh receives 2008 Neubeck Award

Bibiana Koh, a Ph.D. student in the Department of Family Social Science, is the recipient of the 2008 Neubeck Scholarship for Professional Development.

This travel award is available annually for a student presenting a paper at the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) or at other professional conferences in the family field. Koh will present her paper at the NCFR Adoption Initiative conference this November. Currently the award is $600.

Willoughby to publish in JAR

Family Social Science graduate student Brian Willoughby had his refereed paper entitled "The Decline of In Loco Parentis and the Shift to Coed Housing on College Campuses" selected for publication in the Journal of Adolescent Research.

The Effect of Marital Attitudes, Sexual Experience and Dating Behavior

Brian Willoughby, FSoS graduate student received the Wes Burr Student Paper Award for best student paper in the Family Science section for National Council on Family Relations. The paper is entitled: "The Effect of Marital Attitudes, Sexual Experience and Dating Behavior on the Practice and Endorsement of Cohabitation."

The Decline of In Loco Parentis and the Shift to Coed Housing on Campus

FSoS graduate student, Brian Willoughby, had his refereed paper entitled “The Decline of In Loco Parentis and the Shift to Coed Housing on College Campuses�? selected for publication in Journal of Adolescent Research.

October 24, 2008

2008 Neubeck Award

Bibiana Koh, FSoS Ph.D. student, is the recipient of the 2008 Neubeck Scholarship for Professional Development.


This travel award is available annually for a student presenting a paper at the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) or at other professional conferences in the family field. Bibana will present her paper at the NCFR Adoption Initiative conference this November. Neubeck ScholarshipCurrently the award is $600.

October 23, 2008

Marriage friendly therapy

Bill Doherty, FSoS professor, describes what he means by "marriage friendly therapy" and learn why he and his colleague started a website, www.marriagefriendlytherapists.com, that offer couples experienced, marriage friendly counselors.


October 22, 2008

Axtell and Meyer appointment to the graduate faculty

The graduate faculty voted to approve the nominations of Sara Axtell and Cynthia Meyer to M2 Member/Advising status on the graduate faculty at its meeting held September 15, 2008.
Congratulations Sara and Cynthia!

The criteria for membership is established by the Graduate School Social Sciences Policy and Review Council: Criteria for Membership: M2 (Member/Advising) and M (Member).

Those faculty members receiving M2 (Member/Advising) and M (Member) status should hold the Ph.D. or terminal Professional degree (e.g., MSW or JD) in the field of appointment, or a closely related field, and should be able to teach graduate courses in the appointing program. Additionally, M2s are expected to be active in research and publication, or other appropriate creative or professional activity, and to have the potential for graduate-level advising. It is expected that most recently completed Ph.D.s will be appointed at the M2 level. At the discretion of the appointing program and with a Senior Member of the program, faculty holding M2 appointment may co-advise doctoral students.

M status includes the following responsibilities: teaching; service as an examining committee member for masters’ and postbaccalaureate certificate (PBC) students; and service as a thesis reviewer for masters’ students. In minor-only programs and at the discretion of the appointing program, M status may also include service as a committee member and thesis reviewer for doctoral students, representing the field of the minor. M2 status may additionally include advising master's students; service as an examining committee member and thesis reviewer for doctoral students, and co-advising doctoral students. M2s and Ms may participate in governance of the graduate program.

U hosts international art exhibit

The Minnesota Daily covers the Iraqi art exhibition hosted in main office of Family Social Science (room 290). Read the full article.

October 21, 2008

Paydirt: A chance for a lesson

Sharon Danes gives suggestions on how to talk to your kids about what's been happening in the financial news in the Star Tribune article Paydirt: A chance for a lesson.

Doherty mentioned in article on birthdays

Professor Bill Doherty's (Family Social Science) Birthdays without Pressure is mentioned in a recent article.

Finding balance in the season of birthdays
The Jewish Daily Forward (N.Y.) Oct. 16, 2008

Danes: Use crisis as lesson for kids

Professor Sharon Danes (Family Social Science) discusses ways to use the recent economic turmoil to teach children about finances.

Paydirt: A chance for a lesson
Star Tribune (Minn.) Oct. 18, 2008

October 14, 2008

Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET) Trauma treatment for survivors of war and torture

Seminar: Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET) Trauma treatment for survivors of war and torture

Claudia Catani, Ph.D., Expertise: Neurophysiology of stress reactions; epidemiology and treatment of trauma related disorders of organized and family violence, Board member of vivo Germany and Italy and Frank Neuner, Ph.D., Expertise: Psychotherapy of torture victims; clinical and neuroscientific research, Member of vivo Germany, Italy and Uganda will conduct a seminar on Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET) Trauma treatment for survivors of war and torture. Cantani and Neuner are visiting from the Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Bielefeld, Germany.

As part of the International Mass Trauma program of research in the Department of Family Social Science, this seminar is presented by Cantani and Neuner, its originators from Germany and vivo Foundation. NET is an evidence based intervention developed for the treatment of PTSD implemented worldwide to those affected by traumatic events resulting from war, organized violence and natural disasters. It incorporates cognitive-behavioral exposure therapy and testimony therapy, explicitly addressing the sociopolitical aspects of healing. The seminar will address the cognitive and neuroscientific background of NET, the procedure and the current state of evaluation research with asylum seekers, refugees, and war survivors in conflict regions.

This event is free and open to the public.
DATE:
Monday, November 10th, 2008
TIME:
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (seminar)
12:00 p.m. to 1 p.m. (refreshments and Q&A)
LOCATION:
University of Minnesota, St. Paul Campus, 274 McNeal Hall, 1985 Buford Avenue

For more information contact Dr. Liz Wieling

Co-sponsored by the Department of Family Social Science and the Center for Victims of Torture

October 13, 2008

Rosenblatt talks about upcoming teleconference

Professor Paul Rosenblatt (Family Social Science) will be a panelist at the Hospice Foundation of America's 16th annual National Bereavement Teleconference "Diversity and End-of-Life Care." Here is a brief YouTube clip of Paul discussing the event.

The teleconference will be broadcast Wednesday, April 29 from 1:30 to 4:00 p.m ET. The program will focus on ways of understanding diversity and how cultural histories, traditions, and beliefs can affect end of life care.

Rosenblatt to speak at St. Olaf

RosenblattProfessor Paul Rosenblatt (Family Social Science) will visit St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, on October 24 to discuss his book Two in a Bed: The Social System of Couple Bed Sharing.

The event, which is part of the "Discovering Families" lecture series, will be held at 7 p.m. in Dittmann 305 on the St. Olaf campus. For more information contact Kari VanDerVeen at 507-786-3970.

FSOS grad students receive AAMFT fellowship

Family Social Science graduate students Kimberly Diggles, Kara Erolin, and Laurelle Olsen received the 2008-2009 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) Minority Fellowship.

The 2008-09 class includes all of the inaugural students plus three additional students, totaling 23 fellows.

Funded by a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), AAMFT has created the Minority Fellowship Program to support the training of practitioners or practitioner/researchers in mental health and substance abuse services, treatment, and prevention. This fellowship program is directed at marriage and family therapy doctoral students who are committed to research about and service to ethnic minority and underserved populations.

The AAMFT Minority Fellowship Program’s objective is to expand the delivery of culturally competent mental health and substance abuse services to underserved minority populations and to increase the number of culturally competent ethnic minority marriage and family therapists. Their goal is to provide financial support and professional guidance to individuals pursuing doctoral degrees in marriage and family therapy.

Congratulations Kimberly, Kara, and Laurelle!

Rosenblatt video on Diversity and EOL Care Panelist

Hospice Foundation of America 16th annual National Bereavement Teleconference "Diversity and End-of-Life Care" will be broadcast Wednesday, April 29 from 1:30p-4p ET. The program will focus on ways of understanding diversity and how cultural histories, traditions and beliefs can affect end of life care.

Panelist Paul C. Rosenblatt, PhD, speaks about HFA's 2009 Teleconference, Diversity and End-of-Life Care, airing on April 29, 2009.
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Video production by Limelight Communications, Inc.

October 10, 2008

Stop stealing the sheets!

University of Minnesota Professor of Family Social Science Dr. Paul Rosenblatt will visit St. Olaf Oct. 24 to discuss his book Two in a Bed: The Social System of Couple Bed Sharing. The event, which is part of the "Discovering Families" lecture series, will be held at 7 p.m. in Dittmann 305.
For more information contact Kari VanDerVeen at 507-786-3970.

October 8, 2008

FSoS graduate students received the 2008-2009 AAMFT Minority Fellowship

Kimberly Diggles, Kara Erolin, and Laurelle Olsen have received the 2008-2009 AAMFT Minority Fellowship. The 2008-09 class includes all of the inaugural students plus three additional students, totaling 23 fellows.
Funded by a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), AAMFT has created the Minority Fellowship Program to support the training of practitioners or practitioner/researchers in mental health and substance abuse services, treatment and prevention. This fellowship program is directed at Marriage and Family Therapy doctoral students who are committed to research about and service to ethnic minority and underserved populations.

The AAMFT Minority Fellowship Program’s objective is to expand the delivery of culturally competent mental health and substance abuse services to underserved minority populations and to increase the number of culturally competent ethnic minority Marriage and Family therapists. Their goal is to provide financial support and professional guidance to individuals pursuing doctoral degrees in Marriage and Family therapy.

An MFP fellowship is more than a simple scholarship that only provides financial support. An MFP fellowship is a professional training appointment into a community of other students and professionals who hold similar professional interests. Indeed, the MFP provides stipends, or living allowances, to students who hold the fellowships. However, we also facilitate professional development and provide professional guidance with the aim of moving students towards high achievement in areas related to minority mental health research and services.

FSoS Graduate - candidate for Mahtomedi School Board

FSoS graduate, Mary Deters, is running for a seat on the the Mahtomedi school board. Read the full artilce.

October 3, 2008

Mom and Pop go over the top

William Doherty, FSoS professor, contributes to the Star Tribune's Opinion Exchange stating "There's a trend toward excessive parenting, often expressed through youth sports. The detritus of this obsession: Injury, burnout, even lesser achievement." Read the full article.

October 2, 2008

How to build assets

Catherine Solheim, FSoS professor, discusses how to build assets, interviewed by Brad Sattin of KSTP Channel 5. Listen to the full Critical Mention article.

Talking to kids about the economy

If children sense your stress about the economy, try the approach suggested by Catherine Solheim, FSoS Professor. Read the full Washington DC WTOP article

Troubled economy means serious talks for parents

If there's one bright side to growing economic problems, it may be that it's forcing parents to sit down and have the talk with their kids. Cathy Solheim, FSoS Professor, is quoted in the Canadian Press, read the article.

September 29, 2008

Solheim: Take control while Wall Street doesn't

With Wall Street crippled, the housing market in shambles and the cost of living rising, American families are facing some uncertainty and need thriftier ways to manage their finances. Family social science associate professor Cathy Solheim says an effective first step is to get creative and budget with help from regular old envelopes.

Download the fully produced :90 feature or download the raw interview audio.

Doherty comments on overscheduled children

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) comments on overscheduled children in a recent Washington Post article.

For Some Busy Kids, It's All Good
Washington Post (D.C.) Sept. 28, 2008

September 25, 2008

University of Minnesota Moment: Take Control While Wall Street Doesn't

With Wall Street crippled, the housing market in shambles and the cost of living rising, American families are facing some uncertainty and need thriftier ways to manage their finances. University of Minnesota family social science associate professor Catherine Solheim says an effective first step is to get creative and budget with help from regular old envelopes. Listen to audio: Take Control While Wall Street Doesn't

September 23, 2008

Hurd to partcipate in HECUA Metro Urban Studies

Gabrielle Hurd, an undergraduate student in the Department of Family Social Science, has been invited to participate in HECUA's Spring 2009 Metro Urban Studies term.

She is examining issues of poverty and inequality in the Twin Cities. She will work with nonprofit organizations, community activists, and politicians (among others) who will provide her with a context for understanding her readings/studies about economics, housing systems, education, welfare, government policies, urban sprawl, regional race and class segregation, and institutional discrimination.

Higher Education Consortium for Urban Affairs (HECUA) is an organization of 19 liberal arts colleges, universities, and associations dedicated to education for social justice. HECUA programs combine a unique approach to classroom-based work with an experiential, reflective, and critical look at the important social issues of our program sites. Their classrooms combine discussion, readings, and reflection with ongoing field experience through internships, field-work, and research projects. Because social problems and social change are complex issues, their approach to understanding them draws on multiple academic disciplines, the integration of theoretical material with experiential learning, and ongoing holistic reflection.

Danes comments on emotion behind money loss

Professor Sharon Danes (Family Social Science) discusses the emotional ramifications of a sudden loss of income.

Learning to reach lower for happiness
International Herald Tribune (France) Sept. 19, 2008

FSoS undergrad invited to participate in HECUA Metro Urban Studies

Gabrielle Hurd, FSoS undergraduate student, has been invited to participate in HECUA's Spring 2009 Metro Urban Studies term. She is examining issues of poverty and inequality in the Twin Cities. She will work with non-profit organizations, community activists, and politicians (among others) who will provide her with a context for understanding her readings/studies about economics, housing systems, education, welfare, government policies, urban sprawl, regional race and class segregation, and institutional discrimination.

Higher Education Consortium for Urban Affairs (HECUA) an organization of 19 liberal arts colleges, universities and associations dedicated to education for social justice. HECUA programs combine a unique approach to classroom-based work with an experiential, reflective, and critical look at the important social issues of our program sites. Our classrooms combine discussion, readings, and reflection with on-going field experience through internships, field-work, and research projects. Because social problems and social change are complex issues, our approach to understanding them draws on multiple academic disciplines, the integration of theoretical material with experiential learning, and ongoing holistic reflection.

September 22, 2008

Learning to reach lower for happiness

Sharon Danes, an economist and professor at the University of Minnesota Family Social Science, who advises family businesses, is quoted in the International Herald Tribune. Sharon likens the emotional reaction to a suddenly reduced income to the loss cycle in mourning a death. Read full story

September 16, 2008

Building prosperity through self-employment

When low-wage workers are facing layoffs or reduced hours, they become more resourceful and find many ways to earn money on the side to supplement their income. Further, individuals who are unable to find work are turning to their "side jobs" as their main source of income and now face the complexities of being "self-employed."

1-Day Conference
November 18, 2008
9 am to 4 pm
Continuing Education &
Conference Center
University of Minnesota,
St. Paul Campus

Conference details and registration Download file
The goal of this conference is to arm professionals, who work with these individuals, with tools and resources for navigating self-employment to build family stability and prosperity.

September 12, 2008

First FSoS Roundtable Meeting for Fall 2008

The first fall 2008 FSoS Roundtable meeting will be Tuesday, September 16th at 4:20 in 146 McNeal Hall.

FSoS Roundtable is a great way to create a sense of identity within the Family Social Science Department, establish networking opportunities, promote healthy relationships, and take part in hands-on community service and involvement.

Should you have specific questions about this growing undergraduate student organization, please contact co-presidents, Laura Skubic, Jill Moran or Amanda Matzek, undergraduate adviser.

We look forward to seeing you at the first meeting!

MN Family Formation Project-Couple Connection Event

On September 11, Bill Doherty led a talk on “Sharing Appreciation�? for couples and mentors participating in the Minnesota Family Formation Project. The monthly event is part of an initiative that works with unmarried and married new parents who want to form stable families in which to raise their child. After the talk, the couples and their mentors formed into small groups to discuss how to show appreciation to their partner and why showing appreciation is important to building a healthy marriage.

The Minnesota Family Formation Project takes a community organizing approach by engaging seasoned leader couples and unmarried new parents to form stable families and healthy marriages. The project matches couples with an experienced mentor couples who can help support unmarried new parents along their journey. The next couple Connection Event theme is focused on dealing with money issues as a couple.

September 11, 2008

Families try present-free parties

Bill Doherty was interviewed for an article on present-free parties in the Washington Times .

September 10, 2008

Ph.D. Preliminary Oral Examination

Karen Kramer and Kristin Schneider Dillon, both passed a preliminary oral examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Family Social Science.

Kristin Schneider Dillon’s committee:
Jodi Dworkin (Chair), Abigail Gewirtz, Martha Rueter, and outside member, G J August (Professor of Psychiatry)

Karen Kramer’s committee:
B. Jan McCulloch (Chair), Jean Bauer,
Catherine Solheim, and outside member, Erin Kelly (Associate Professor of
Sociology)

Congratulations to both!!!

2008-2009 Family Social Science Colloquium Kick-off

On Wednesday, September 10 in 278 McNeal Hall, Cathy Solheim, kicked-off the 2008-2009 FSoS Colloquium series with a short video of Tony Robbins discussing "Why we do what we do and how we can do it better" from TED.com, an Internet-based resource which brings together thought leaders and doers "who are challenged to give the talk of their lives."

After the video, graduate students and faculty reflected on the ideas Robbins presented - the invisible forces that motivate our actions - and how they relate to our roles as people, students, faculty, staff, citizens, family members, etc. There were lively discussions were both entertaining and thought-provoking.

About the FSoS Colloquium:
The Department of Family Social Science at the University of Minnesota hosts a weekly Colloquium Series. During this hour-long forum, we invite colleagues from the university and community to share their scholarship and experiences, typically in some form of presentation. This is followed by a time for questions and dialog. Our goals are to learn about a wide variety of topics from diverse perspectives, to stretch our thinking beyond our usual comfort zones, and to engage in respectful dialog about topics related to families in their local and global contexts.

September 5, 2008

Trauma Focused Parent Coaching

Ambit Network has begun hosting a yearlong learning collaborative on Trauma Focused Parent Coaching. The twelve participants in the learning collaborative represent mental health providers from a variety of community agencies including Center for Victims of Torture, Centro Cultural, Tubman, and three agencies working directly with Minneapolis Public Schools: La Familia, Mental Health Collective, and African Aid. Mental health providers from these agencies will participate in 18 full days of interactive training that will prepare them to facilitate parent groups of Trauma Focused Parent Coaching beginning in fall 2008.

Trauma Focused Parent Coaching, developed by Dr. Abi Gewirtz and colleagues, is an adaptation of Parenting Through Change (PTC), a 14-week group-based parent training intervention that has been designated a National Registry of Effective and Promising Practices ‘model practice’. Developed by Dr. Marion Forgatch, PTC was originally designed as a preventive intervention to improve adjustment and curb the emergence of behavior problems among children of newly single and separating mothers (Forgatch & DeGarmo, 1999). Trauma Focused Parent Coaching seeks to build on PTC effectiveness for traumatized populations by enhancing curriculum focus on emotion socialization, emotion regulation, and mindfulness.

Dr. Gewirtz, project director of Ambit Network, will be delivering the training and ongoing coaching, together with Laura Rains of Oregon Social Learning Center. Drs. Crystal Cullerton-Sen and Dawn Reckinger will be coordinating the yearlong learning collaborative.

photo: Role Playing
PMTO-014.jpg

September 3, 2008

Reduce harm caused by tobacco in MN’s S.E. Asian communities

On Saturday, August 23, 2008 50 members of the Cambodian, Hmong, Lao and Vietnamese communities gathered at Lao Family Community of Minnesota in St. Paul as part of the ClearWay Southeast Asian Tobacco Intervention Project (SEATIP). The purpose of the half-day retreat was to bring leaders and community members from four SEA together to celebrate the work of SEATIP, discuss the preliminary results of Dr. Zha Blong Xiong's research on community engagement around tobacco intervention, and explore the next steps each of the four communities can take to implement culturally appropriate smoking intervention strategies. Organizational leaders from Lao Advancement Organization of America, Lao Family Community of Minnesota, United Cambodian Association of Minnesota and Vietnamese Minnesotans Association and their invited guests from their communities participated in the retreat, which was one of the first times all four communities came together to share knowledge and collaborate on a common goal. At the retreat, 20 attending community leaders who had participated in the community leadership groups were acknowledged and awarded certificates of appreciation. Both the research project and the retreat were funded by ClearWay Minnesota. View image

September 2, 2008

Welcome the 2008 FSoS Cohort!

2008CohortsBlog.jpg

Left to Right
front row:
Roberta Daigle (Student Support Services Assistant), Jennifer Sampson (Ph.D. MFT), Xiaohui Li (Ph.D.), Erica Kanewischer (Ph.D. MFT), Laurel Davis (MA/Ph.D.), Juyoung Jang (Ph.D.), Han-NahKim (MA/Ph.D.)
back row:
Max Zubatsky (Ph.D. MFT), Jean Bauer (Professor, Director of Graduate Studies & Extension Specialist), Tisa Thomas (Ph.D.), Meaghan Nelson (Ph.D.)

August 22, 2008

Sam Rieks passed her national MFT licensing exam

Congratulations to graduate student Sam Rieks who passed her national MFT licensing exam in June. She is now a Licensed Associate Marriage and Family Therapist.

August 13, 2008

More news on birthday parties

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) is quoted in an article on alternatives to elaborate children's birthday parties.

Forget the Joneses

Washington Times (D.C.) August 13, 2008

August 12, 2008

Doherty discusses Edwards' affair

Professor Bill Doherty discusses possible motivations behind former Senator John Edwards' extramarital affair on WCCO news.

August 11, 2008

Doherty discusses Edwards' affair

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) discusses possible motivations behind former Senator John Edwards' extramarital affair.

'U Of M' doctor explains Edwards' admitted affair
WCCO (Minn.) August 8, 2008

August 8, 2008

Turner writes Obama bill for food safety

Professor William Turner wrote a food safety bill introduced by Senator Barack Obama. The Improving Food-borne Illness Surveillance and Response Act of 2008 would improve information sharing and collaboration between public and private agencies and other organizations to effectively address food safety challenges. William had great help in writing the bill from the Centers for Disease Control, former directors of the Food and Drug Administration, and the nation's top researchers on food-borne illness, including Dr. John Besser of the Minnesota Health Department. For more information about the bill download the news release. Download file

August 7, 2008

Turner writes Obama bill for food safety

Professor William Turner (Family Social Science) recently wrote a food safety bill that was introduced by Senator Barack Obama. In addition, the Wall Street Journal is doing an in-depth story on the biill for an upcoming issue. The Improving Food-borne Illness Surveillance and Response Act of 2008 would improve information sharing and collaboration between public and private agencies and other organizations to effectively address food safety challenges. William had great help in writing the bill from the Centers for Disease Control, former directors of the Food and Drug Administration, and the nation's top researchers on food-borne illness, including Dr. John Besser of the Minnesota Health Department. For more information about the bill download the press release.

August 5, 2008

Ambit Network: new branding reflects mission

Minnesota Child Response Center is now Ambit Network. Ambit means circuit, compass and a sphere of action or influence. Network was chosen because it represents the array of resources and people at work in the organization.

Ambit Network provides insights for therapists, social service providers and frontline mental health workers who serve children and families exposed to traumatic events. The research and knowledge of Ambit Network benefits organizations through technical assistance, training, evaluation and case consultation.

Project Team:
Abigail Gewirtz, Ph.D., LP, Project Director
Dawn Reckinger, MPH, Ph.D., Associate Director
Mary Jo Avendano, PhD, LMFT, Clinical Director
Crystal Cullerton-Sen, Ph.D., Clinical Program Manager
Heidi Flessert, Program Associate
Karen Kramer, Graduate Assistant
Libby Plowman, Graduate Assistant

splash.jpg

August 4, 2008

More on Doherty's Birthdays Without Pressure

Take the stress out of birthday parties
Tehran Times (Iran) August 2, 2008

July 30, 2008

Yang selected for Hmong women leadership program

Pa Nhia Yang, a doctoral student in the Department of Family Social Science, has been selected to participate in the Hmong Women's Leadership Institute. The Institute provides emerging Hmong women leaders with the opportunity to develop their leadership in a supportive, nurturing environment. Fifteen women were selected to participate in culturally appropriate leadership development training from August 2008 through December 2008. Participants will learn how to use and practice their leadership in a way that creates lasting change on a personal, family, organizational, and global level. They will receive monthly group mentoring and/or coaching and will organize a community project that helps the Hmong community to build sustainable, systemic wide changes around social change, particularly gender issues.

Congratulations Pa Nhia!

July 14, 2008

Turner to speak on health policy

Professor William Turner (Family Social Science), Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow for Senator Barack Obama, will address the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science on Friday July 18, at the Keck Center Auditorium in Washington, D.C. The title of his presentation is “Beyond Access: Expanding our Definitions of Health Policy."

Lassig wins outstanding student paper award

Sara Lassig, a doctoral student in the Department of Family Social Science, was chosen to receive the 2008 Graduate Outstanding Student Paper Award from the National Council on Family Relations’ Association of Councils.

Congratulations Sara!

July 1, 2008

Doherty to speak at upcoming marriage conference

Family social science professor Bill Doherty will be speaking at an upcoming conference on building healthy marriages.

'Smart' marriage evolves
Washington Times (D.C.) July 1, 2008

June 26, 2008

Doherty talks dads in two recent articles

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) and his research on fathers has been mentioned in two recent articles.

Lack of dad critical for School 9 students
Democrat & Chronicle (N.Y.) June 23, 2008

What moms can learn from dads
USA Today (Va.) June 24, 2008

June 25, 2008

Doherty discusses marriage trends

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) was featured in a recent Minnesota Monthly article on the troubled state of marriage.

A more perfect union
Minnesota Monthly (Minn.) July 2008


June 16, 2008

Dikkers and Solheim win DMC funding

Lecturer Amy Garrett Dikkers (Educational Policy and Administration) and Professor Cathy Solheim (Family Social Science) have been named 2008-09 Digital Media Center (DMC) Faculty Fellows. Each will receive funding in the amount of $10,000 to be used in support of their projects.

Congratulations Amy and Cathy!

June 11, 2008

Stum gives tips for passing on personal belongings

Professor Marlene Stum (Family Social Science) offers tips to families on dividing the personal possessions of deceased loved ones.

Home & Family Finance Radio: Who Gets Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate?
Credit Union National Association (D.C.) Feb. 10, 2008

June 10, 2008

Doherty: Build memories with family vacations

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) comments on family vacations, and their ability to build lasting memories.

Vacations are good for you, medically speaking
New York Times (N.Y.) June 7, 2008

June 6, 2008

U of M Moment: Youth drinking class for parents

With the recent string of young adult alcohol-related deaths across the state, the University has started to offer its online alcohol education class to concerned parents everywhere. Jodi Dworkin, an assistant professor of Family Social Science, is involved in the program and says the need is out there to help parents talk about alcohol with their kids.

Download the interview [MP3]

June 4, 2008

Caron receives posthumous award from MAMFT

Wayne CaronThe Minnesota Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (MAMFT) recognized Wayne Caron's work as a professor, supervisor, colleague, therapist, and friend with a 2008 Annual Award. Wayne, a faculty member in the Department of Family Social Science, passed away suddenly on August 24, 2007 (see the Minnesota Daily article on Wayne and his many accomplishments or visit his memorial Web site).

June 3, 2008

Battaglia chosen for HECUA program

Laura Battaglia, an undergraduate student in the Department of Family Social Science, has been invited to participate in the Higher Education Consortium for Urban Affairs' (HECUA) Fall 2008 Metro Urban Studies program. Laura is currently examining issues of poverty and inequality in the Twin Cities. As part of the HECUA program, she will work with nonprofit organizations, community activists, and politicians who will provide her with a context for understanding her readings and studies about economics, housing systems, education, welfare, government policies, urban sprawl, regional race and class segregation, and institutional discrimination.

HECUA an organization of 19 liberal arts colleges, universities, and associations dedicated to education for social justice. HECUA programs combine classroom-based work with experiential, reflective, and critical looks at the important social issues of their program sites.

Congratulations, Laura!

May 29, 2008

Promotion for Dworkin

Jodi Dworkin, a faculty member in the Department of Family Social Science, has been promoted from assistant to associate professor. The change will become effective in August.

Congratulations, Jodi!

Doherty advocates for family vacations

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) comments on the value of family vacations.

Help protect the family vacation
The Columbian (Wash.) May 29, 2008

May 28, 2008

Kramer wins Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship

The Minnesota Population Center has selected Family Social Science student Karen Kramer to receive a one-year Interdisciplinary Doctoral Fellowship, to begin Fall 2008.

This $22,000 fellowship includes tuition and fringe benefits for the academic year. Karen will work with the Minnesota Population Center and Erin Kelly, an MPC faculty fellow, on her dissertation research. This is the first year of this University-wide interdisciplinary doctoral fellowship. The fellowship provides a unique study opportunity for outstanding Ph.D. students whose research and scholarly interests complement those of one of the University-wide, interdisciplinary research centers or institutes. Students are expected to devote a substantial amount of their time to developing their current or proposed dissertation topic during the fellowship year.

Congratulations, Karen!

Doherty comments on kids' birthday parties

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) comments on "supersized" children's birthday parties.

I want my party now
Toronto Star (Canada) May 28, 2008

May 27, 2008

Doherty quoted in eco birthday article

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) is quoted in an article on eco-friendly children's birthday parties.

Some parents trying to make kids parties less wasteful
Austin American-Statesman (Tex.) May 19, 2008

FSoS students win funds

Several students from the Department of Family Social Science were awarded funds for this summer and the upcoming school year:

  • Jaerim Lee was selected for AAUW International Fellowship. Seventy eight (78) were selected out of 1050 applicants. Jaerim will not accept the award because she has already received the University's Dissertation Fellowship award (see below).

  • Receiving Graduate School Dissertation Fellowships were Brian Willoughby and Jaerim Lee. The Dissertation Award is for $22,000 stipend for academic year and full benefits.

  • FSoS Block Grant awards for summer research activities were awarded to 3 students: Katie Brewton, Bibiana Koh, and Amanda Matzek. This award is for $5,000.

  • Waller Summer Fellowships for research activities were awarded to14 students: Brooke Skinner Drawz, Clinton Gudmunson, Karen Kramer, Jaerim Lee, Jinhee Lee, Tomoko Ogasawara, Ella Packingham, Dorothy Rombo, Polina Sheldeshova, Seohee Son, Jessie Evert Tripoli, Brian Willoughby, Janet Yeats, Julie Zaloudek. This award is for $5,000.

Congratulations to all of these outstanding FSoS students!

May 22, 2008

William Turner invited to board and to publish

Family social science professor William Turner has been invited to join the Family Process Institute board of directors. The institute is a multidisciplinary, multinational organization dedicated to the development and exchange of new theory and research about families, systems, and adaptive change.

Family Process Institute also publishes Family Process, a unique journal comprising contributions from multiple disciplines related to clinical practice, theory, quantitative and qualitative research, and training in the family and family therapy fields. The nearly 40-year-old publication caters to individuals across the professional life span.

Turner has also been invited by the Royal College of Psychiatrists London division to contribute to a volume of Psychiatrists as Professionals in the 21st Century, published by Oxford University Press. The 167-year-old Royal College of Psychiatrists is the professional and educational body for psychiatrists in the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland.

May 12, 2008

In pictures: FSoS Senior Portfolio Review Day

The Department of Family Social Science's Senior Portfolio Review Day took place on May 7. See the attached PDF for photos and captions describing the event.

Download file [PDF].

May 7, 2008

Doherty comments on lavish birthday parties

Family Social Science professor Bill Doherty is quoted in an article on lavish children's birthday parties.

Parents, unite! Ban birthday party blowouts
Stuff (New Zealand) May 7, 2008

Zaloudek receives Fichter grant

Family Social Science student Julie Zaloudek’s proposal "BEM sex role inventory and Christian Protestants’ perceptions of God (Jesus)" will receive a 2008 Fichter Research Grant equaling $10,325.

The Fichter Grant is awarded by the Association for the Sociology of Religion (ASR), an international scholarly association that seeks to advance theory and research in the sociology of religion. The Association encourages and communicates research that ranges widely across the multiple themes and approaches in the study of religion, and is a focal point for comparative, historical, and theoretical contributions to the field.

Congratulations, Julie!

Gilbert and Axtell to co-chair Transgender Commission

Field Coordinator MJ Gilbert (Social Work), along with Sarah Axtell (Family Social Science) has accepted the position of co-chair of the University's Transgender Commission. The commission is associated with the GLBTA Programs Office, and reports to the Vice President and Vice Provost for Equity and Diversity.

The University of Minnesota Transgender Commission works to create equity, access, and an inclusive environment for people of all genders through education, advocacy, and institutional change. The Commission strives to honor transgender people and celebrate gender diversity; make visible the systems of gender that profoundly affect all our lived experiences; and eliminate the discrimination faced by transgender and gender non-conforming students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community members.

More information about the Transgender Commission can be found at http://glbta.umn.edu/trans. Anyone interested in the work of the commission, or in becoming involved, should contact MJ at 612-624-4259 or mgilbert@umn.edu.

April 29, 2008

Bauer quoted in affluenza article

Family social science professor Jean Bauer is quoted in an article on affluenza and money management.

$urviving the Economy: Dig out of debt
KARE 11 (Minn.) April 29, 2008

Doherty to parents: Don't act on your favorites

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) comments on the potentially damaging effects of parents playing favorites with their children.

Good question: Is it wrong to play favorites?
WCCO (Minn.) April 28, 2008

April 28, 2008

In pictures: Grotevant retirement party

As those of you who attended last week's College Awards ceremony know, Family Social Science professor Hal Grotevant is retiring from the department to join the faculty at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Below is a link to download pictures from Hal's April 18 retirement party. Enjoy!

Download photo album [.pdf].

April 21, 2008

Boss to speak at Gray tribute

Professor Emeritius Pauline Boss (Family Social Science) is speaking at UC Berkeley’s Tribute to Jim Gray on May 31. Jim Gray, a Silicon Valley legend, is known for his groundbreaking work as a programmer, database expert, and Microsoft engineer. Gray’s work helped make possible such technologies as the cash machine, e-commerce, online ticketing, and deep databases like Google. Jim Gray disappeared without a trace on a sailing trip to the Farallon Islands on January 28, 2007.

Speakers at the tribute will address the attributes and accomplishments that contributed to Gray’s world renowned reputation.

April 16, 2008

McCulloch and Lassig to speak at gerontology conference

Professor B. Jan McCulloch and doctoral student Sara Lassig, both from the Department of Family Social Science, are invited speakers at the Minnesota Gerontological Society’s 2008 Annual Conference “Aging and the Family . . . It’s all in the Genes!" on April 25. Their topic is Rural Issues in Caregiving.

March 27, 2008

More press on birthdays gone wild

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) offers comment in another article on super-sized children's birthday parties.

Birthday presents get a timeout from parents

Boston Globe (Mass.) March 27, 2008

March 26, 2008

Craft wins President's Faculty Multicultural Research Award

Assistant Professor Shonda Craft (Family Social Science) is a winner of the 2008 President's Faculty Multicultural Research Award. The award, sponsored by the University's Office for Equity and Diversity, is designed to encourage and support research on issues related to people of color, particularly in a North American context.

Congratulations Shonda!

March 19, 2008

McCulloch and Dworkin elected to NCFR

The National Council on Family Relations (NCFR), the oldest multidisciplinary non-partisan professional organization focused solely on family research, practice, and education, has elected two members from the Department of Family Social Science:

Professor and Department Head B. Jan McCulloch has been named Chair of the NCFR Family and Health section. The mission of the Family and Health Section is to promote the health of diverse families and their members through interdisciplinary activities that facilitate excellence in family health practice, research, education, and policy development.

Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist Jodi Dworkin has been elected Secretary/Treasurer of the Education and Enrichment section. The Education and Enrichment section shares information on effective family life education, teaching materials and methods, and marriage enrichment interests. Focus Groups include Marriage and Family Enrichment, Certified Family Life Educators, Sexuality, Parent Education, Families and Grief, and Peace.

Congratulations Jan and Jodi!

March 13, 2008

FSoS student comments on upcoming election

Kellie Holt, a junior in the Department of Family Social Science, recently commented on the implications of being an African-American woman choosing between Barack Obama and HIllary Clinton.

Clinton-Obama race producing 'delightful dilemma' for black women
MinnPost (Minn.) March 13, 2008

March 7, 2008

Rosenblatt comments on male housework study

Professor Paul Rosenblatt (family social science) commented on a recent study that links men doing housework to increased sexual intimacy with their partners.

Men who do more housework may get more sex
KMSP (Minn.) March 6, 2008

March 3, 2008

Doherty discusses lavish kids' parties

Bill Doherty.jpgProfessor Bill Doherty in the Department of Family Social Science comments on the rise in lavish children's parties in this article from the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Goody bags gone bad
Cleveland Plain Dealer (Ohio) March 3, 2008

Parents giving 'out-of-control birthday parties' left holding the bag

Sun Journal (ME) March 13, 2008

February 27, 2008

Craft shares research on women, HIV, and pregnancy

According to research by Shonda Craft, assistant professor of family social science, about one in four women who have tested positive for HIV expect pregnancy and motherhood to be a part of their future.

About one-quarter of women with HIV want to become pregnant
ScienceDaily (Md.) Feb. 27, 2008


February 21, 2008

Zuiker: Students should learn budget basics

Virginia Zuiker, associate professor of family social science, comments on the need for students to learn more about financial management.

Loan refunds: Spend on spring break or rent?
Minnesota Daily (Minn.) Feb. 21, 2008

January 30, 2008

In memoriam: Gerhard (Gerry) Neubeck

NeubeckNCFR.jpgIt is with great sadness that we say goodbye to our dear friend, colleague, and mentor Professor Emeritus Gerhard (Gerry) Neubeck (Family Social Science). Gerry began his professional career at the University in 1948 after already experiencing a lifetime of fortune and tumult.

As a Jewish teenager from Dortmund, Germany, Gerry nearly qualified for the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games in the 3000m run. Soon after, he realized he had to leave his home country. After immigrating to the United States with his wife Ruth in the late 1930s, Gerry became one of the nation’s foremost leaders in the fields of human sexuality and marriage and family therapy (MFT). He served terms as president both of the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) and the American Association of Marriage and Family Counselors (AAMFT). After graduating from Columbia University, he went on to accomplish a number of ‘firsts’ in his field. In the 1960s he taught the first college course on human sexuality.

Profiled in Look magazine, this course gained Gerry scores of attention for his work. He is credited for being the first to use group sessions for marriage therapy and also was the first to pen a book on the topic of extramarital affairs. In 1972 he joined the Department of Family Social Science, where for many years he ran the marriage and family therapy (MFT) program. Over the course of his tenure, Gerry was pivotal in training countless MFT experts including David Olson and Jim Maddock.

After retiring in 1986, Gerry and his wife Ruth spent much of their time keeping busy with their long-time hobbies. Gerry was a prolific writer of poetry and Ruth a potter (they were dubbed the “Poet and the Potter"). Some of Gerry’s poetry has been published and crossed over into the academic world to appear in textbooks focusing on family relations.

Since his retirement, Gerry has remained a regular around the department. He read his poetry at everything from new graduate student welcoming functions to faculty retirement parties. Gerry said during a 2004 interview: “Family social science has always stood on the strength of great faculty. Not only the talent of the faculty—including multiple NCFR and AAMFT presidents—but also the intimacy. The faculty has always been very close.? Gerry will be greatly missed.

Excerpt from Gerry’s poem "Affairs of the Heart", published in 1998:

I want to find me
that I lost long, long ago
when I was a child
in a world that was all grown up.
It would be nice indeed.
To become acquainted again
With that me, the me of my youth.

Read an article about Gerry.

January 18, 2008

FSoS emerti named NCFR Fellows

Family social science professors emeriti M. Janice Hogan and David Olson have been named National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) Fellows. Fellowship status in NCFR is an honor awarded to relatively few members of NCFR who have made outstanding and enduring contributions to the field of the family in the areas of scholarship, teaching, outreach, or professional service, including service to NCFR. By definition, outstanding contributions are those that have had a broad impact on the field and are enduring over time. Congratulations Jan and David!

December 19, 2007

CEHD faculty help revise U tenure policy

Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) and Assistant Professor Karen Miksch (Postsecondary Teaching and Learning) served on the University's 2006-2007 Academic Freedom and Tenure committee, a group charged with revising the University's tenure policy. The new "Procedures for Reviewing Candidates for Tenure and/or Promotion: Tenure-Track and Tenured Faculty" went into effect in October.

"Tenure policy revised in historic effort"
UMN Brief (Minn.) Dec. 19, 2007

Bill Doherty.jpgMikschK-2007[1].jpg

Danes comments on family-owned businesses

DanesS-2007[1].jpgSharon Danes, a professor and extension specialist in the Department of Family Social Science, is mentioned in an article on the management challenges of family-owned businesses.

"Marriages may hurt businesses, vice versa"
Springfield Business Journal (Fla.) Dec. 17, 2007

December 4, 2007

Parent-child communication important, says Solheim

SolheimC-2007.jpgFamily social science professor Cathy Solheim commented on the importance of parent-child communication in a recent article on baby boomer history classes for college students.

Boomer course closes generation gap
USA Today (V.A.) Dec. 3, 2007

November 28, 2007

Buckholz to enter leadership program

Nikki Buckholz, a senior in the Department of Family Social Science, has been selected to participate in the 2008 Tom Burnett Advanced Leadership Program. Each spring 15 University of Minnesota students are chosen to participate in the advanced leadership development program. This program features life and career mentoring, weekly leadership workshops, and in-depth assessment of each student's personality traits, potential career paths, and leadership skills, so that each one can make a difference one person at a time. Associate Professor Cathy Solheim nominated Nikki for this program.

October 31, 2007

Gewirtz suggests uses for Halloween candy

Assistant Professor Abigail Gewirtz (family social science) offers tips for using Halloween candy to teach children self-control. What to do with all that Halloween candy (KARE-11 News)

October 30, 2007

Grotevant quoted in open adoption article

Professor Harold Grotevant (family social science) and his research on openness in adoption was mentioned in a recent New York Times Magazine article.

October 29, 2007

Family meal time important, says Doherty

Bill Doherty.jpgFamily social science professor Bill Doherty was quoted in a St. Cloud Times article this past Friday. The article was on a new cooking class in the St. Cloud area for preschoolers and their families. Doherty commented on the importance of family meal time to healthy child and family development.

October 22, 2007

Boss and ambiguous loss featured in Seattle Times

Pauline Boss.jpgProfessor Emeritus Pauline Boss (family social science) and her work in ambiguous loss were featured in a recent Seattle Times article.

Olson receives award for outstanding leadership

Congratulations to Trish Olson (family social science), who was presented with the Outstanding Leadership Award at the 2007 Minnesota Extension Fall Program Conference. Trish is the area program leader of Family Resource Management and director of the Center for Personal and Family Financial Education in St. Paul. This award recognizes her work connecting the external community with University resources and forging vital relationships at all levels of the organization.

October 8, 2007

Doherty's research mentioned in 'Generation M' article

Bill Doherty.jpgFamily social science professor Bill Doherty's research on children's free time was mentioned in a recent Eagle Tribune article on Generation M (where M stands for media).

October 5, 2007

Students cut it close with money, says Solheim

SolheimC-2007.jpg Family social science professor Cathy Solheim commented on college students' financial habits in a Star Tribune article.

October 1, 2007

Doherty offers tips on activist children

Bill Doherty.jpgProfessor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) offers tips on parenting activist children in a recent Wall Street Journal article.

Anxious parents fuel consulting industry, says Doherty

Bill Doherty.jpgFamily social science professor Bill Doherty comments on the rise of professional parenting consultants in this San Francisco Chronicle article.

September 24, 2007

"Children's parties out of control," says Doherty

Bill Doherty.jpgFamily social science professor Bill Doherty published an editorial in yesterday's Newsday. The topic of the editorial was on the recent proliferation of lavish children's parties.

September 10, 2007

Doherty comments on sane schedules for children

Bill Doherty.jpgProfessor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) is briefly quoted in a Patriot Ledger article on managing children's schedules.

August 31, 2007

MN families under stress from bridge collapse, says Boss

Pauline Boss.jpg
Professor Emerita Pauline Boss (Family Social Science) comments in a Star Tribune article that Minnesota families are under enormous emotional stress from the recent bridge collapse.

August 29, 2007

In memoriam: Wayne Caron

Wayne Caron.jpgAs many of you already know, Assistant Professor Wayne Caron in the Department of Family Social Science passed away suddenly on Friday, August 24. The department has established the online Wayne Caron Memorial Page to give Wayne's many friends, colleagues, and family members a space in which to share their memories, tributes, thoughts, poems, pictures, or links to external Web sites. As Wayne's colleague Professor Hal Grotevant notes, "Wayne was such a lover of technology--we think he would approve." Send your posts to caron@umn.edu. (This is not Wayne's personal e-mail account. It was set up specifically for entries for the memorial page.)

An August 28 Star Tribune article remembers Wayne's many contributions to the Alzheimer's community, and gives details about funeral arrangements.

August 21, 2007

Men and women approach problems differently, says Doherty

Bill Doherty.jpgIn a recent Washington Post article, Professor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) comments on the different problem-solving techniques employed by men and women.

August 15, 2007

Boss discusses coping strategies after bridge collapse

Pauline Boss.jpgProfessor Emerita Pauline Boss (Family Social Science) appeared on MPR Midday this week to discuss the bridge collapse. With divers still searching the river for bodily remains, several families are coping with ambigous loss, Boss' primary area of research. Listen to her radio appearance by clicking on this link.

August 13, 2007

Doherty discusses open marriage

Bill Doherty.jpgProfesssor Bill Doherty (Family Social Science) discusses the history of open marriage in this ABC News article.

July 30, 2007

Trembly, program to air on TPT

For those of you who missed it back in March, you now have a second chance to view "Pets Caught in the Crossfire of Family Violence," a program that was taped at "Building a Bridge of Hope: Interdisciplinary Conference on Family Violence and Animal Abuse." The conference, a joint effort between the University's College of Veterinary Medicine, Partners for Violence Prevention, the American Humane Association, and Minnesota's Department of Human Services, was co-chaired by none other than our own Holli Trombley, a graduate student in the Department of Family Social Science. Twin Cities Public Television (TPT) will air "Pets" on August 4 at 8pm. TPT is on channel 17.

July 27, 2007

Doherty: Don't overschedule your child

In a recent article in the Evansville Courier & Press, family social science professor Bill Doherty cautions parents against overscheduling children.

July 23, 2007

Stum awarded GSA fellow status

The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) has awarded fellow status to Professor Marlene Stum (Family Social Science). GSA Fellows represent the highest class of membership and are recognized by their peers for outstanding contributions to the field of gerontology.

GSA is the oldest and largest national multidisciplinary scientific organization devoted to the advancement of gerontological research. Its membership includes some 5,000 researchers, educators, practitioners, and other professionals in the field of aging. The Society’s principal missions are to promote research and education in aging, and to encourage the dissemination of research results to other scientists, decision makers, and practitioners.

June 25, 2007

Doherty comments on supersize grad parties

DohertyW.jpgBill Doherty, professor of family social science, comments on the rise in lavish graduation parties in this Star Tribune article.

May 29, 2007

Roadside memorials help ease grief, says Boss

In a recent Star Tribune article, Professor Emerita Pauline Boss (family social science) comments on the rising popularity of roadside memorials to commemorate traffic fatalities.

May 24, 2007

Mr. Turner goes to Washington

William Turner, professor of family social science, has been awarded a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship, to begin September 1. The fellowship allows Turner to work in Washington, D.C. for a year with federal agencies and legislators on health policy matters, and then return to the University to pursue his own work in health policy.

Yang inducted into Phi U

In March graduate student Pa Nhia Yang (Family Social Science) was inducted into the Phi Upsilon Omicron Honors Society. The society honors academic excellence in family and consumer sciences.

May 23, 2007

Lassig wins gerontology scholarship

Graduate student Sara Lassig (Family Social Science) has been awarded the Bloedow Scholarship as an outstanding graduate student in the field of gerontology. The award was presented by the Minnesota Gerontological Society.