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Recently posted in Movement Science

Professor of kinesiology StoffregenT-2013.jpgDr. Thomas A. Stoffregen and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) gave an invited talk at the University of Caen, France on Monday, January 6. The title of his talk was "La mer et le corps."

A group of students from Minneapolis Southwest and Minnetonka High School, who are part of their school's exercise science courses, came to visit two of the School of Kinesiology's research facilities on December 11. Students went to the Center for Clinical Movement Lab and the Human and Sport Performance Lab to get first-hand experiences and connect what they are learning in class with what occurs in the laboratories. Students then had the chance to take part in testing and research while asking questions and interacting with the researchers.

wade-china.jpgProfessor Michael Wade, Ph.D., recently visited the American Cultural Center for Sport at Tianjin University of Sport (TUS) and gave a lecture, "Life time motor development: Movement by design and movement that informs," to over one hundred graduate students and faculty members.

TUS President Yao Jiaxin was Wade's translator when he visited China in 1989. The visit served as a reunion and reflected a long history of academic exchange between the two countries. During the visit, Yao showed the old photos and letters of their previous meeting over two decades ago.

ElangovanN-2013.jpgNaveen Elangovan, doctoral student and trained physical therapist, served as the lead author in an article titled, "Assessing proprioceptive function: Evaluating joint position matching methods against psychophysical thresholds." The research compared three different methods for assessing proprioceptive function in humans.

The article is set to publish in Physical Therapy, a prestigious journal with an impact factor of 2.78. Co-authors of this article include Amanda Herrmann (M.S., '12) and Dr. Juergen Konczak, professor of kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Lab (HSCL).

Juergen.jpgJürgen Konczak, Ph.D., professor of kinesiology and director of the Human Sensorimotor Control Laboratory, spoke at the the University of Minnesota Graduate Program in Neuroscience Colloquium Series on Novemeber 6. His talk was titled, "Somatosensory deficits as markers of basal-ganglia disease." Dr. Konczak is also a faculty member of the Graduate Program in Neuroscience.

Professor of kinesiology StoffregenT-2013.jpgDr. Thomas A. Stoffregen and his research as director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) was featured in the Star Tribune in an article titled, "A simulator at the U of M is rethinking motion sickness."

In the article, Stoffregen explains a new theory for why people get motion sickness, attributing it to body sway, not to the inner ear. "The way that you sway is predictive of whether you're susceptible to motion sickness," Stoffregen said.

Read the entire piece here as well watch a video of Stoffregen explaining his research.

Professor of kinesiology StoffregenT-2013.jpgDr. Thomas A. Stoffregen and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) gave an invited colloquium at the University of Minnesota Center for Cognitive Sciences on October 24. The title of his presentation was, "The Devil's Spectacles." Dr. Stoffregen spoke about the intimate relations between science, philosophy, religion, and technology over the past 3,000 years. He explained how they relate to behavioral sciences in general and more specifically to the theories of vision.

Professor of kinesiology StoffregenT-2013.jpgDr. Thomas A. Stoffregen and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) is quoted in, "Why Do Humans Get Motion Sickness?," an article published in Mother Jones.

In the article Stoffregen describes his perspective on motion sickness, "because you lose your equilibrium, you get motion sick." Stoffregen has accumulated a lot of evidence surrounding the topic and has more recently gained recognition for it.

Professor of kinesiology StoffregenT-2013.jpgDr. Thomas A. Stoffregen and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) gave insight into which category he felt should be added to the Nobel Prize.

The article, "What's missing from the Nobel Prize? Scientists weigh in," includes a poll conducted through LiveScience where scientists from around the world responded with categories they thought should be incorporated. Stoffregen explained that behavioral science should be added because a high volume of critical, deserving work is being accomplished in the field.

Professor of kinesiology Dr. Thomas A. Stoffregen and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) was quoted in the Live Science article, "Is iOS 7 Making You Feel Sick? Here's Why."


Stoffregen, one of the experts, said that he was not surprised that many people using iOS 7 were feeling motion sickness and added, "As imaging technology develops across platforms, and we get greater frame rates and resolution, we find an increasing tendency for it to make people sick."

Stoffregen also remarked on motion sickness in the article, "Apple Inc's iOS 7 Users Report Motion Sickness After Prolonged Use of iOS 7 iPhone, iPad; How to Reduce Parallax Effect," an article featured in International Business Times. He explains that motion sickness may become worse as people continue to use digital devices.

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