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Dr. Donald Dengel, professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), is the lead author of an article published in Pediatric Blood & Cancer. The article is titled, "Signs of Early Sub-Clinical Atherosclerosis in Childhood Cancer Survivors," and it examined arterial blood vessel function in 319 childhood cancer survivors and 208 sibling controls. The results of this study demonstrated that early in life, childhood cancer survivors have changes in their arterial blood vessels that indicate an increased risk for premature atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

Professor of kinesiology StoffregenT-2013.jpgDr. Thomas A. Stoffregen and director of the Affordance Perception-Action Laboratory (APAL) gave an invited talk at the University of Caen, France on Monday, January 6. The title of his talk was "La mer et le corps."

wcr_2013-14_infographic.jpgTune in to CBS this Friday, January 10, at 8:30 a.m. to see a segment featuring high-profile female athletic directors discussing the lack of women in sport administration and coaching. The segment was inspired by the Tucker Center's recent release of the Women in Collegiate Coaching Report Card.

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Dr. Donald Dengel, professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP) [pictured above], and Tyler Bosch, doctoral candidate [pictured below] are recipients of the Scientific Manuscript Excellence Honor: Gary A. Dudley Memorial Paper for their article "Body Composition and Bone Mineral Density of National Football League Players." Their research, published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, examined the body composition of National Football League (NFL) players before the start of their regular season. The findings are a template for future studies examining fat, lean, and bone mass in NFL players.


The Gary A. Dudley Memorial Paper is one of the highest honors the National Strength and Conditioning Association gives for scholarship and is named after one of the pioneers in modern exercise physiology research.

ACH.jpg Dr. Zan Gao, assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab (PAEL), and Dr. Donald Dengel, professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP), are co-investigators of a recently funded Academic Health Center Seed Grant titled, "Effect of a Home-based Fitness Intervention on Cardiometabolic Risk Profile in Pediatric Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)." This seed grant is a pilot feasibility study to collect preliminary data for a large-scale exergaming intervention in children undergoing maintenance therapy for ALL.

Li Li Ji, Ph.D., director of the School of Kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene and Exercise Science (LPHES), recently received a nearly $200,000 grant from PepsiCo to study the bioavailability and healthy benefits of oat avenanthramides (AVA), a phytoalexins that exist predominantly in the hulled kernels of oat seeds. Phytoalexins are any of various antimicrobial chemical substances produced by plants to combat infection by a pathogen.

The research involves testing participants' ability to utilize AVA from dietary oat consumption to decrease systemic inflammation and muscle damage due to exercise as well as to increase antioxidant function and mental health indicators.

MarlattK-2013.jpgKara Marlatt, a doctoral student in the School of Kinesiology, is the lead author of an article published in the Journal of Pediatrics. Marlatt is a co-author with her adviser, Dr. Donald Dengel, professor of kinesiology and director of the Laboratory of Integrative Human Physiology (LIHP).

The full citation is: Marlatt KL, Steinberger J, Dengel DR, Sinaiko A, Moran A, Chow LS, Steffen LM, Zhou X, Kelly AS: Impact of pubertal development on endothelial function and arterial elasticity. The Journal of Pediatrics 2013,163(5):1432-1436.

wcr-group.pngIn the 40+ years after the passage of Title IX, female sport participation is at an all-time high but the percentage of women coaching women at the collegiate level has declined from 90+% in 1974 to a near all-time low today of 40%. In addition, though the number of collegiate coaching opportunities is also at a record high, only 20% of all college coaching positions for women's or men's teams are filled by women. To help stop the decline of and increase the percentage of women in the coaching profession, and to increase awareness and start a national dialogue on this issue, the Tucker Center for Research on Girls & Women in Sport commemorates its 20th anniversary in collaboration with the Alliance of Women Coaches by launching a cutting edge research series and report card aimed at increasing the number of women in the coaching profession. Learn more about the historic decline in the percentage of women coaches, why this research and women coaches matter, how minority status in the workplace can affect individuals, and see which of 76 select "big time" NCAA Division-I institutions, sports and conferences receive passing and failing grades based on the percentage of head women coaches of women's teams.

wcr-brennan-usat.jpgDr. Nicole M. LaVoi, teaching faculty in the School of Kinesiology and associate director of the Tucker Center, is quoted extensively in an exclusive USAToday article by columnist Christine Brennan, "Colleges doing poorly at hiring women coaches." The piece highlights two reports and an infographic authored by LaVoi on the decline in women coaches in collegiate athletics. The reports and infographic are available at the Tucker Center website.

Related story: Tucker Center kicks off women in coaching research initiative with two reports and infographic

Dr. Zan GaoDr. Zan Gao, assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology and director of the Physical Activity Epidemiology Lab (PAEL), has recently has been awarded a Grant-in-Aid from the University's Office of the Vice President for Research, for his work on exergaming.

Gao's work is titled, "Effects of Exergaming on Urban Children's Physical Activity and Body Composition," and was designed to examine the impact of exergaming on underserved urban children's physical activity levels and body composition, as well as mediating role of psychosocial beliefs on the effects of exergaming.

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