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Troy Knight

  • Commented on Question Submission 14 (Last One)
    I agree, to me it seems that modern science is engaged in an effort to reduce classical genetics, but the thing is that this is more of a result of the current direction of science and not a main goal...
  • Commented on Question Submission 14 (Last One)
    Waters explains that the cardinal argument in support of layer-cake antireductionism and the idea that “classical genetics will never be reduced, eliminated, or explained away because its central theory explains kinds of phenomena that are best explained at the level...
  • Commented on Question Submission 13
    So are today’s emerging biotechnologies, such as synthetic biology and bionanotechnology giving increasingly more fuel to the reductionist point of view? To me it seems that some of today’s emerging biotechnologies reinforce the reductionist’s account while others further reinforce the...
  • Commented on Question Submission 13
    In “The Structure3 of Biological Science” Rosenberg invokes the fact that Mendelian genetics cannot be reduced to molecular biology, and that synonymous terms between the two sciences are lacking, as evidence that a theory of reduction does not hold water....
  • Commented on Question Submission 12
    I agree; the distinction between ‘revolutionary science’ and ‘normal science’ seems arbitrary and their use unnecessary. To me, it makes more sense to refer how much a science has changed as a result of new information/discovery. Attempting to determine if...
  • Commented on Question Submission 12
    Hull explains Kuhn’s definitions of the terms ‘revolutionary science’ and ‘normal science’ attributing sweeping, replacement changes to the former and more plodding, minor changes to the latter term. Hull offers the example of Aristotelian physics ultimately being replaced by Newtonian...
  • Commented on Question Submission 11
    I find this question interesting. I do agree that it often seem that physisics cannot be applied to biology but the more i think about it, i think that in fact it does tend to apply to biology it just...
  • Commented on Question Submission 10
    Reflecting on the discussion at the end of class on Tuesday regarding the scientific method, focusing primarily on the process forming a hypothesis, I have this nagging thought: Does the construction of a pre-experimental hypothesis provide any benefit to the...
  • Commented on Question Submission 10
    In chapter 9 Morange gives a history of how the tools of centrifugation, electrophoresis, and the utilization of isotopes to purify and label macromolecules were developed and incorporated into biological research. Additionally, Morange explains some obstacles that had to be...
  • Commented on Question Submission 9
    “…where would we be if physicists didn’t think they could solve problems they have no real understanding of?” I found this question interesting for the fact that I believe some would hesitate to clam, as Marange does, that a physicist’s...
  • Commented on Question Submission 9
    Morange’s writing, although is a little bit heavy at times, is easy enough to understand for someone with even a scant background in science, i believe.I think it’s worth noting his ability to boil down what are complex and confusing...
  • Commented on Question Submission 8
    I find this this question interesting: “Does the dtructure of the chromosome and the genes located on it not represent just the thought process of the scientist(s) while they manipulated reality in order to produce results that went in accordance...
  • Commented on Question Submission 8
    In chapter 3 of his manuscript, Professor Waters makes a case for the inherent problem with determining the physical relationship between different alleles on a chromosome via genetic linkage mapping through studding rates of recombination. The problem, as Waters reveals,...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    I don’t actually believe an epistemological approach to science would hinder science in the direct sense; I really meant it as a rhetorical question eliciting a prompt rebuke... with a tinge of cynicism. But now I’ve thought about it, there...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    I believe that the notion that “experimental conclusions at some point need to tie to pre-existing theories” relies on an assumption that I don’t believe one has enough evidence to make; that is, the premise that there needs to be...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    **sorry about the grammatical typo that snuck past me ;')...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    Professor Waters explain how the vantage points of the preformation interpretation and the transmission interpretation are flawed because they both possess a theory bias; that is, they rely and build upon an incomplete and certainly imperfect theoretical account of science....
  • Commented on Question Submission 6
    Looking through an epistemological lens while questioning how much science truly knows about biology and how much science thinks it knows, it is evident that the theories, and even models, that modern scientists use to understand the natural world are...
  • Commented on Question Submission 5
    It seems to me that if reproduction and evolution were/ could be completely independent of one another that ted definition of reproduction would be so vague such that it would have encompass systems that seen intuitively distinct from reproduction....
  • Commented on Question Submission 5
    Godfrey-Smith's views on the relation between individuality and reproduction in chimeras reminded me of an article I read awhile back on the experimentation stemming from the work of (i believe) Dr. White in Australia decades ago when a goat-sheep chimera...
  • Commented on Question Submission 4
    My question challenges whether we actually know what we are relatively certain we know about the origin of hereditary and variation. In Morgan’s work along with Sturtevant, Bridges, and Muller the model organism Drosophila melanoganster was used during experimentation in...
  • Commented on Question Submission 3
    I found this question helpful for thinking about the relationship between what science actually knows from an experiment and what science things it knows from the results of an experiment. I agree with the assessment that Boveri’s conclusion provided by...
  • Commented on Question Submission 3
    William Wimsatt’s makes the case in his 2006 article that a heuristic approach can be utilized to reach a more complete and accurate understanding of complex biological processes such as the genetic inheritance of alleles and chromosomes that in turn...
  • Commented on Question Submission 2
    In response to Joe’s question, I think he makes a great point in understating and representing the fact that what we consider to be good science today differs from what was considered to be good science back when Mendel was...
  • Commented on Question Submission 2
    Sept. 20 2010 In Chapter 2 of Heredity and Development, “The Cellular Basis of Inheritance”, Moore discusses ‘cell theory’ and how its realization in the mid 17th century was critical to understanding the actualities of the nature of biological heredity....
  • Commented on Trial Run
    Mendel...
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