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kling202

  • Commented on Question Submission 12
    Toward the beginning of Chapter 1, Hull claims that after forming rigorous definitions of "reductionism", philosophers are unable to classify any scientific movement as solely undergoing reduction. However, he also says that many scientific revolutions have taken place. He does...
  • Commented on Question Submission 11
    On page 332 of the Schaffner article, he says, "When reductions between theories occur, terms in the reducing and reduced theories often change their meaning: they now have new connections and the referents are characterised in a more general way."...
  • Commented on Question Submission 10
    woops, I have no idea how that happened! Sorry for the double post....
  • Commented on Question Submission 10
    I have had the same question in my mind for a while and now have it slightly better formulated after this week's reading. What is scientific success and how does one measure it? I ask this question partially looking for...
  • Commented on Question Submission 10
    I have had the same question in my mind for a while and now have it slightly better formulated after this week's reading. What is scientific success and how does one measure it? I ask this question partially looking for...
  • Commented on Question Submission 9
    On page 8 (the Introduction) of Morange's A History of Molecular Biology, he states, "Too great a distance from the material also explains the biased interpretation that some historians have made of David Bloor's principle of symmetry, which argues that...
  • Commented on Question Submission 9
    On page 8 (the Introduction) of Morange's A History of Molecular Biology, he states, "Too great a distance from the material also explains the biased interpretation that some historians have made of David Bloor's principle of symmetry, which argues that...
  • Commented on Question Submission 8
    The Questions: As a biology student, I am struggling to connect many of the philosophical concepts in Water's manuscript to present day research. He says in chapter 3 "Historians and philosophers tend to assume that the abstract models of science...
  • Commented on Question Submission 8
    I am very interested in what Waters says in the last paragraph of section 3.4 of his book manuscript. (This paragraph starts "What's philosophically interesting about there representation structures...".) Generally, I would like to hear more about how Water's came...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    Brooke's question: In Tuesday's lecture, Professor Waters was describing the different scientific domains (theory centered and practice conception). For the theory centered domain, there is some theory that that can explain a wide variety of problems. Water's practice conception, consists...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    This question is from Kitcher's "1953 and all That. A Tale of Two Science". On page 352 he says, "Second, we think of genetic theory as something that persisted through various versions: what is the relation among the versions of...
  • Commented on Question Submission 6
    Chris' question: Prof Waters suggests that many developments in science occur not as a result of theorizing & discussions about theory as well as possible/plausible accounts for observed phenomena; but rather, as a result of pragmatic moves/techniques/ made by the...
  • Commented on Question Submission 6
    I have two questions from this week's reading. On p. 2 of Chapter 1, Waters says, "This epistemology is developed in the context of experimantal sciences centered on DNA, but has something to say about the nature of scientific knowledge...
  • Commented on Question Submission 5
    This is probably odd, but I am going to respond to my own question since Griesemer cleared some things up for me. On page 82 of "Reproduction and Individuality" (from Peter Godfrey-Smith's book Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection), he writes,...
  • Commented on Question Submission 5
    On page 82 of "Reproduction and Individuality" (from Peter Godfrey-Smith's book Darwinian Populations and Natural Selection), he writes, "And the most familiar cases of reproduction to us--human sexual reproduction--feature an obvious role for genetic novelty." However, Godfrey-Smith spends the chapter...
  • Commented on Question Submission 4
    Will's question: This question concerns "Tracking Organic Processes: Representation and Research Styles in Classical Embryology and Genetics" by Griesemer. I liked this paper for its success in articulating a view of conceptual change in genetics, development, and heredity that goes...
  • Commented on Question Submission 4
    In Griesemer's chapter 12, he emphasizes the importance of the mathematical expression of a combination series and notation in Mendel's work. On page 386, he sates, "Mendel's first mention of the concept of a developmental series makes it clear that...
  • Commented on Question Submission 3
    Molly's question: My question has to do with Dr. Wimsatt's paper Reductionism and its Heuristics, in particular centering around the role that heuristics play. Wimsatt writes that "[p]hilosophers start in the wrong place to understand most debates in the complex...
  • Commented on Question Submission 3
    As a note, this reading was very difficult for me to understand. Hence, it is entirely possible that my question will make absolutely no sense or be answered elsewhere in the reading. On page 450 of Wimsatt's article, he states,...
  • Commented on Question Submission 2
    Brooke's Question: In Gregor Mendel’s Experiments in Plant Hybridization, it is stated that there is evidence that the hybrids are not an intermediate form between the two parent species. Sometimes one parent’s characteristics are shown in a greater quantity in...
  • Commented on Question Submission 2
    Previously, in Origin of Species, Darwin emphasized the popularity of the categorization of different species and varieties. In this endeavor, as well as in the study of heredity, it seems as though scientists were focused on observable differences. However, in...
  • Commented on Question Submission 1
    Perhaps I am missing what exactly it is you are referring to, however, as I interpret those quotations: Aristotle claims that we inherit character from both of our parents and Darwin states, more specifically, that traits are usually passed on...
  • Commented on Question Submission 1
    In class on Thursday, I recall a small part of the lecture referencing the fact that, "Darwin was in fact embarrassed by too much perfection, which would have been seen as evidence for a creator, and so delighted in pointing...
  • Commented on Trial Run
    Mendel...
  • Commented on Trial Run
    RUN, TRIAL... RUN!!!!!! Mendel...
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