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Nick Zampa

  • Commented on Question Submission 14 (Last One)
    Thanks for the response Chris. I'm interested in what you say about theories, mostly that they can be inappropriately applied outside of their explanatory range once they have become successful (and thus entrenched) within their proper explanatory range. First, let's...
  • Commented on Question Submission 14 (Last One)
    First, I believe the shift between molecular and classical genetics is marked by a much thicker line than pre/post double helix, though I do not think Waters would disagree (no sharks here, I just need this information to help set...
  • Commented on Question Submission 13
    I think this particular thread is interesting. First, look at Will Bausman's response earlier in this thread to get a good idea at what it means to look at science in two different ways (dynamic vs. static). I'm not sure...
  • Commented on Question Submission 13
    I am unsure what to make of the following quote, "None of the philosophers currently writing on this topic are suggesting inadequacies in the kinds of mechanisms postulated by molecular geneticists for the explanation of more macroscopic genetic phenomena" (Wimsatt...
  • Commented on Question Submission 12
    I think the following may clear up why reduction is sometimes pursued in philosophy of science. At the very least, the following quote answers why taking a stance on reduction or at least thinking about reduction is important to philosophy...
  • Commented on Question Submission 12
    Hull's analysis of the reduction of Mendelian Genetics to molecular genetics ignores what I think may be a central issue in discussions of reduction in biology. Essentially, Hull attempts to describe the reduction of one entire domain, modern transmission genetics,...
  • Commented on Question Submission 11
    I would have to read Donna Haraway's paper myself, but she doesn't seem to be talking about reduction in the same sense that philosophers talk about reduction. "Reducing" biodiversity to genetic diversity is an experimental heuristic, innately fallible and incapable...
  • Commented on Question Submission 10
    I am interested in what others make of the following distinction. Morange writes, "The techniques can be used with two rather different aims: an analytical objective...or a preparative objective..." (p.93) Robert Kohler in his book, Lords of the Fly, makes...
  • Commented on Question Submission 9
    I wonder with what criteria do we specify a scientific domain? Obviously there are non-arbitrary criteria for doing this such as asking with what basic theory did a given school operate, and with what investigative strategies. This bears directly on...
  • Commented on Question Submission 8
    Patrick's questions were answered in part by Prof. Waters in class. In short, Prof. Waters said that scientific knowledge is contextually situated in the way described by his paper. But, I found Patrick's questions interesting if looked at in a...
  • Commented on Question Submission 8
    In Chapter 3 - The Practice of Classical Genetics, Prof. Waters explains the several investigatory strategies not centered around explaining inheritance patterns. That is, those in the Morgan school were often after explanations of different phenomena such as chromosomal mechanics,...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    Emily writes, "Waters' representation shrinks the explanatory scope of scientific theories, but couldn't the old paradigm remain intact with a more widely encompassing conception of "explanation"?" Here, I wonder what exactly you mean when you call for a more encompassing...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    In class, I asked Prof. Waters to re-describe what he meant by the "success" of classical genetics. That answer is clearly found in the following quote, "The success of experimental science involves establishing practices that generate better and better methods...
  • Commented on Question Submission 6
    Prof. Griesemer's discussion of counter-examples is illuminated as follows. Prof. Griesemer does not attempt to give an in principle analytic claim about what it must be for anything to be a reproducer. That is, he is not saying that his...
  • Commented on Question Submission 6
    After reading the recommended part of the introduction and chapter 2 of Prof. Waters' manuscript, I am confused about why we must be anti-realists. First, I agree that if a scientific practice correctly describes some entity, then this entity need...
  • Commented on Question Submission 5
    Chris Perdoni asks, "The question, then, is whether it is plausible to explain evolutionary transitions and the overall progression of evolution in terms of the continual distancing of interactor and replicator roles within an organism?" I found this question particularly...
  • Commented on Question Submission 5
    At the end of Chapter 4, Peter Godfrey-Smith concludes that relaxing the concepts of individuality and reproduction will allow one to accept, as reproduction, the cases that challenged the intuitive conception of reproduction, so long as we constrain ourselves to...
  • Commented on Question Submission 4
    I found this question particularly interesting. I initially had the very same worries and questions about false models, but slowly developed a different perspective. Chris asks the following: "If, sticking to false models can be fruitful; should scientists, when...
  • Commented on Question Submission 4
    In Tracking Organic Processes: Representation and Research Styles in Classical Embryology and Genetics, Dr. Griesemer levies the claim that the study of genetics and the study of development seek to explain the same causal process (p.378 – 379). Moreover, Prof....
  • Commented on Question Submission 3
    In Prof. Wimsatt’s 2006 paper, he demonstrates the empirical fruitfulness of inter-level identifications and localizations. That empirical fruitfulness is not achieved by mere correspondence statements. Prof. Wimsatt shows that making a strong identity claim between chromosomes and Mendelian factors, even...
  • Commented on Question Submission 2
    Mendel's generalizations about hybrid development in peas depend on a true breeding parental generation. A question arose as to whether any of his pea plants really could have been shown to be true breeding after the F2 generation. First, true-breeding...
  • Commented on Question Submission 2
    In every biology textbook from high school through college, Mendel is credited with devising certain biological laws of inheritance, namely, the law of segregation, and the law of independent assortment. However, Mendel’s original paper does not make any reference to...
  • Commented on Question Submission 1
    In response to Emily's questions though particularly the following: "And if matter is an expression of immaterial forces (energy), then the distinction between entity and force is merely an illusion." I found this question and the series of questions leading...
  • Commented on Question Submission 1
    In various sections of the first four chapters of On the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin attributes general biological characteristics to species and populations of organisms. For example on pg. 102, Darwin claims, “A large amount of inheritable and diversified...
  • Commented on Trial Run
    mendel...
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