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fenlo012

  • Commented on Final Blog entry
    I completely agree with your point that we must look at this issue from the perspective of other people. I had never really been challenged to think that much beyond my own experiences and I'm so happy that this class...
  • Posted Final Blog to Engaging Justice GWSS 1005
    I am so happy I decided to take this class this semester. Before taking it, I discovered that I had a very limited knowledge about justice. In one of my first blogs I mentioned a quote from the U.S. Department...
  • Posted Last Entry to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    The aspect of psychology I will remember most five years from now is the sections we covered in human development. My major is child psychology and I am very interested in the development of children. What I find especially interesting is the process of social development in children and the process of learning language. I will remember this aspect of psychology because it interests me and because it really stuck out for me. I find it very interesting that all children tend to develop in very similar ways. I will use this knowledge in a future career working with children in a psychological sense. I believe that knowing how development occurs is an important part of understanding how and why humans act certain ways. With this background, I think that what I learned in Psychology 1001 will help me in future Child Psychology classes. I am very excited for my psychology class next semester and I feel especially prepared now that I was able to learn about certain parts of human development. I am happy to have a basic understanding of parenting styles and the emotional development in adolescence. I will use the concepts I learned this semester and apply them to my future education and career....
  • Posted Are SAT and ACT scores reliable? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    The use of ACT and SAT scores in the college admissions process has always been debated. Considering the correlation between admissions tests and college grades are typically below .5 as the Lillenfield text points out, I can see why the use of such scores is so criticized. Many students, like Danielle Rettinger who was interviewed in an NPR report (see link), feel that the tests do not adequately show academic performance. The College Board argues that standardized tests are necessary for colleges to use considering the number of applications they review. Those who argue against the use of SAT and SAT scores say that the number is not an adequate predictor of a student's ability and that the test is particularly biased against women and minorities. I see a problem in the reliability of standardized testing. For example, those who do not do well on the SAT usually score a better equivalent score on the ACT. The SAT and ACT also vary on what they test. Although they test in some similar subjects, the SAT focuses more on grammar than the ACT whereas the ACT tests harder math skills than the SAT. Some colleges have chosen to do away with the ACT and SAT requirement. Bates College in Maine has found that the difference in graduation rate between students who submit scores and those who do not is less than .1 percent indicating that the tests may not be the best predictor of success. I do not think that SAT and ACT scores should be the sole predictor of one's intelligence. As Howard Gardner illustrated, intelligence can come in many forms. Some students are not successful at test taking but might show high intelligence in a different area of academics. Although it would be more difficult during the admissions process, I believe that ultimately, colleges could find more value in looking at overall intelligence rather than a number scored on a standardized test. NPR article about ACT and SAT scores...
  • Posted Disability and Inequality to Engaging Justice GWSS 1005
    Throughout our discussion about disability and ableism, I kept thinking about the severe inequalities disabled individuals face in the United States. What I find very striking is the number of disabled veterans who face difficulties like poverty and homelessness because...
  • Posted Should IQ be the only basis of Intelligence? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    I have always struggled with the idea that a single number can determine the intelligence of an individual. After reading chapter 9 and watching the following video, I realized that IQ should not be used as a single marker of one's overall intelligence. Although IQ scores are valid, there are aspects of IQ testing that must be looked at closely. IQ can predict some aspects of human intelligence. For example, good health literacy and success at mentally demanding occupations both have a positive correlation with IQ. And IQ tests are also valid because the correspond with other modern tests. However, when considering the reliability of an IQ test, we must be very careful. In general, IQ scores remain stable throughout adulthood. But IQ scores are not set and can drastically change over time. So as the man in the video states, it is unfair to set the standards for a student's education based on his standardized test scores from one point in time, in this example, fourth grade. In order to make the testing more reliable, the tests must follow test-retest reliability. In this instance, a student's future could be determined by his scores on one IQ test, but it would be more fair for scores to be taken many times in order to insure reliability. I have personally experiences the difficulties one time IQ tests can cause for an individual. For high school I was asked to take an entrance exam which would ultimately place me in the "correct" math and science classes. I was placed in the middle level math class when in reality, I could have taken the upper level math class. Because my placement was based solely on one test, it became an unreliable marker of my ability. In this situation, I was unfortunately set back because I didn't score well enough on one test. While IQ is helpful and usually a good marker of intelligence, it is important to remember some of the basic scientific thinking principles. Tests must be replicated to ensure reliability and to limit the number of confounding variables, such as specific difficulties on test days due to illness or personal situations....
  • Posted Blog #5 Human Trafficking to Engaging Justice GWSS 1005
    Had it not been for a social justice project in high school, I would never have known the human trafficking industry was so active in the United States. The whole idea of a person being sold for a fixed price...
  • Posted CSI and Complete Amnesia Blog #3 to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    The following is a brief synopsis and video from an episode of CSI: Miami: "A man, wanders through Miami covered in blood but claiming total amnesia, except that he had killed someone. The blood is from insider trading-accused Mitch Crawford, his wife and their daughter, who were seen leaving by car early that day by courier Walter Leeson, who 'borrowed' their luxury pool. The amnesiac's only memories allow Eric to guess the triple knife murder site. His bloody wallet identifies Doug Benson, whose hammer on site wasn't the murder weapon. Using victim shots as a memory stimulus links with Doug's youth trauma. Horatio finds and links two other suspects." As we read and learned in Chapter 7 about Memory, amnesia does not mean that all memories are lost. Retrograde amnesia is a loss of past memories and anterograde amnesia is the loss of encoding abilities, meaning that we cannot remember new experiences. In reality, the amnesia that T.V. and movies portray is considered general amnesia and it is very rare that this type of amnesia occurs. When I saw this episode of CSI the first time, I wasn't aware that amnesia could not usually result in complete loss of one's identity and complete loss of all memories. After learning this chapter, I realized that the way in which CSI depicts amnesia is incorrect. Complete memory loss only occurs in very rare situations. So the suspect would not forget his actions, in this case, the murder. Unfortunately, the T.V. and filmmaking industry, give society an incorrect interpretation of what amnesia is. In some cases, individuals have tried to fake complete amnesia with the incorrect understanding that this frequently occurs. Before being taught that amnesia essentially comes in two main forms, I was also unaware that amnesia doesn't just automatically mean a complete loss of all memories, including one's own identity. Society should be informed about the situations of H.M. and Clive Wearing because amnesia is a real problem that causes difficulties in the lives of everyday people. In Clive Wearing's case, he forgot the last time he saw his wife. Media outlets do a poor job of depicting the impacts amnesia has on people. Instead, it has turned it into a way to cause drama and interest....
  • Posted The United States and Terrorism (Blog #4) to Engaging Justice GWSS 1005
    A particular quote sticks out to me in the article "Abu Ghraib and U.S. Sexual Exceptionalism" by Jasbir Puar. She writes "Amid Bush's claims to the contrary, the actions of the U.S. military in Saddam's former torture chamber certainly narrows...
  • Posted Blog #2 Faith vs Thinking to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    An article published by the American Psychological Association provides an interesting look at the relationship between intuitive thinking and faith. Scientists at Harvard University studied the hypothesis that more intuitive thinkers have stronger religious beliefs. The article explains that intuitive thinking means going with ones first guess and coming to conclusions quickly. In opposition, a reflexive thinker is one who thinks deeply about a decision before coming to a conclusion. For example, reflexive thinkers are the type who would second-guess their initial answer to a question on a test. Researcher Amitai Shenhave explains that they were testing to see how religious beliefs were influenced when a person relied on instincts or if they required more thinking beyond what their instincts originally tell them. In a sample of 882 U.S. adults, participants were asked to take a survey about their beliefs in God before taking a cognitive test that rated how intuitively they thought. They were asked trick-like questions that tested how much they relied on intuition. The study shows that individuals who replied intuitively to the questions were one and a half times more likely to have strong faith in God. Intuitive thinkers were also shown to have increased belief in God over their lifetimes. In another study of 373 participants, scientists noticed that faith levels could be temporarily influenced when intuitive or reflective thinking was focused on. One group was asked to write about a time in which they used intuition, the other, a time in which they used reflective thinking. The group who wrote about intuition showed a greater belief in God after writing the essay than the group who was asked to write reflectively. At the end of the article the author brings up an important point that should be considered in all correlational studies; that correlation does not show causation. He reflects that the studies show a causal link between intuitive thinking and faith but not which causes which. Although these studies tested the effects of intuitive thinking on faith, they acknowledge that an opposing situation could be true. In this case, faith could actually cause intuitive thinking. This study is an example of the importance of remembering that correlation does not show causation. There is an obvious correlation between intuitive thinking and faith but we cannot be certain of which causes which. article link: http://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2011/09/thinking-god.aspx...
  • Posted Gender Identity (Blog #3) to Engaging Justice GWSS 1005
    Our discussions in class about gender identity have made me realize just how complicated the whole idea of gender classification can be. Quite honestly, I was often confused when reading the article "I Know What I Am" because I would...
  • Commented on Marginalization
    Okay that was me that brought this up and I want to make it absolutely clear that I was not saying we were "marginalized" because we were asked to pay more for health insurance. I was saying we were marginalized...
  • Posted Correlation Between Heat and Crime to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    After studying the six principles of scientific thinking, I came across an article that demonstrates the principle that correlation does not mean causation. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/08/06/AR2006080600809_2.html A common correlational study compares the rates between changes in temperature and the number of crimes committed. As we know however, it cannot be automatically assumed that an increase in air temperature directly causes an increase or decrease in crime. In an article published by the Washington Post, journalist Shankar Vedantam discusses the correlation and possible causations of a decrease in crimes after long periods of heat. He notes that crime and high heat show a curvilinear shape, meaning that crime increases initially during a heat wave but then fell. But he also does a good job of recognizing that temperature is not the only factor in crime. For example, population density and time of year can effect criminal action. He also delves deeper into some other possible explanations for why temperature might not necessarily be the cause of an increase in crime. The possible explanation I found most interesting regarded increased alcohol consumption. When the heat goes up, so does alcohol consumption. When this happens, increased crime, especially assaults can take place. Yet another possible explanation, shows a potential reason why crime eventually falls during a particularly long heat wave. Psychologist Paul Bell states that "at a certain point, people prefer to leave rather than fight." Essentially, people might feel extra aggressive due to heat, but after a certain amount of time, the heat becomes too overwhelming. All of these potential explanations for changes in the crime rate when there is an increase in heat show why it is important not to assume causation. The correlation-causation fallacy must be prevented so that we do not lose sight of outside variables. In this case, alcohol consumption can cause an increase in crime rather than the traditional belief that people become more aggressive when it is hot....
  • Posted Blog Two: What is Justice? to Engaging Justice GWSS 1005
    What is justice? Until we started discussions in class, I didn't realize just how complex this question is. The U.S. Department of Justice has a mission statement that reads: "To enforce the law and defend the interests of the United...
  • Posted Assignment #1 - Aly Fenlon to Engaging Justice GWSS 1005
    Hey Everyone! I'm Aly from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I'm a freshman at the U and very excited for this class. I'm currently majoring in child psychology but I'm considering becoming a psychology and GWSS major. I really became interested in Women's...
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