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ihlef015

  • Posted Yesil-Blog Post to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    I found this reading incredibly interesting. The idea of security cameras being everywhere to prevent crimes and acts of terror for "the good of the people" has always made me rather uncomfortable even though it's not like a camera would...
  • Posted Sender & Sullivan-DQ to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    In the article, it is stated that both of the shows that are discussed, especially The Biggest Loser, associates being overweight with laziness and poor self esteem, yet the shows are made out to be in the interest of "bettering...
  • Posted Worlds Apart-Blog to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    While reading the article I kept thinking about the British series An Idiot Abroad. The show has a somewhat similar concept as World's Apart, except it seems much less problematic to me. In this show, Ricky Gervais and one of...
  • Posted Blog Post-Joyrich to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    Though this reading was very dense and at times hard for me to follow along with without being distracted by a whirlwind of difficult language, I did still find it enlightening. One segment of the article that interested me was...
  • Posted Becker-DQ to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    In his article, Becker discusses how homosexual plot lines in television became popular in the 90s and early 2000s because people found them "funny" and "hip" because of their need to be seen as "socially liberal". Many comedies dedicate specific...
  • Posted Blog Post-Violent White Masculinity to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    This article discusses how the media and advertisers perpetuate the stereotype of white male violence and "manliness" through a variety of techniques. I found this article very interesting. Something that jumped out at me was the point made about how...
  • Posted Sex and the City-Discussion Question to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    In "Rereading Sex and the City: Exposing the Hegemonic Feminist Narrative", Rebecca Brasfield criticizes society's celebration of Sex and the City as a powerful, feminist television show by exposing the oppressive and problematic ways it perpetuates racism, classism, homophobia, transphobia,...
  • Posted Blog Post-Girls Gone Antifeminist to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    While I really liked this article and found it very interesting, the comments left on the post were verging on infuriating. I cannot understand why so many women are proudly considering themselves "anti-feminists" like the people commenting here and on...
  • Posted Bettie: Blog Post to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    In her article, Julie Bettie focuses on the ways the television program Roseanne went against the characteristics of other situational comedies at the time by showing realistic experiences of working class families from the perspective of a working class mother...
  • Posted Richard Butsch-Discussion Question to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    In his article, Butsch argues that one of the reasons for the lack of class diversity on television is because networks feel the need to produce content that is suitable for advertising because their main concern is revenue. With more...
  • Posted Blog Post-Lena Dunham to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    I found the interview with Lena Dunham particularly interesting. Since my biggest aspiration is to write for a television show, I have always respected her success in the field even though I do not watch her show 'Girls'. From reading...
  • Posted White Privilege Blog Post to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    The readings this week were very interesting to me. I especially liked Stuart Hall's article and his criticism of the way different cultural groups are portrayed stereotypically in the media. Last semester, I took a class called Diversity in the...
  • Posted Producing Identities Discussion Question to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    In the article, the author says that there has been an underrepresentation of certain social groups such as Blacks and Latinos because advertisers assume these groups are "less desirable" audiences. He goes on to say that as the desirability changes,...
  • Posted Hegemony or Concordance Blog Post to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    Despite being a little on the wordy side, I found that Dana Cloud's article was extremely interesting and enlightening to me. Though I have put time into thinking about how celebrities and the people surrounding them create their image/persona that...
  • Posted Encoding/Decoding-DQ to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    In his article, Stuart Hall discusses how everyone perceives messages different based on their personal experiences and other factors. Though this reading was a little heavy for me to comprehend completely as I've never really been introduced to semiotics before...
  • Posted The Big 5-Discussion Question to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    This article discusses how 50 media conglomerates became only 5 in a very short period of time and then goes into the background of how it happened. Since only 5 corporations own nearly every major media output source, how does...
  • Posted Blog Post: Harry Potter and the Commodity Fetish to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    This article seeks to point out the contradicting ideas that J.K. Rowling conveys In the Harry Potter series about class status and consumerism. I have mixed feelings about this article as a whole as a VERY big Harry Potter fan,...
  • Posted Carr and Shirky Blog Post to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    While reading each of the articles, I found myself using the techniques of the "believing game." I read Carr first, and though I was skeptical of some of his, in Shirky's words, Luddite-esque complaints, I still thought he made some...
  • Posted Discussion Question 1: Elbow and Berube to Media Literacy Spring 2014
    Though Elbow thinks both "The Believing Game" and "The Doubting Game" are important ways to view arguments, he seems to favor The Believing Game, describing it as "the disciplined practice of being as welcoming as possible to every idea we...
  • Posted Power of Authority to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    After all I've learned throughout the Psychology 1001 course, what I will definitely remember 5 years down the road is the Milgram Experiment and its results. I thought it was absolutely shocking how many people went along with the experiment and administered higher and higher voltages of shocks to the learner even when he stopped responding and they knew how dangerous the shocks could be. I think learning about this experiment will help me make decisions in the future. It will help me remember that I should never blindly follow or listen to a figure of authority without asking questions first. Just because someone looks and dresses like a scientist does not mean that they have an infallible concept of morals. I think everyone should learn about this experiment because it is very eye-opening as to how authority can affect humanity. I think it is especially important because it is still relevant. Even though the original experiment took place in the 60s, the recent reenactment of the experiment by the British television show proved that the results obtained today are very similar to those obtained back then, so people are not any less obedient to authority figures today. Blind obedience is something that can lead this world down the wrong path, and everyone should be aware of its effects....
  • Posted Does Criminal Profiling Work? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Criminal profiling is a relatively new scientific field making its way into law enforcement. The goal of criminal profilers is to gather evidence from crime scenes and victim reports to try to put together an accurate description of the offender. Profiling has worked on multiple occasions. In one case, a profiler put together a probably description of the "mad bomber" of New York City, saying that he is most likely not married, foreign, and around the age of 50. This description turned out to be right on, and the cops found the offender a lot faster than they would have without the profiler's description. But does criminal profiling actually work? Or is this just an anecdotal occasion? Robert Homant, PhD, of the University of Detroit Mercy thinks criminal profiling is lacking in external validity. When put to the test in an experimental situation, criminal profilers wrote more detailed descriptions of offenders, but they were not always more accurate than other group's descriptions were. They were given both a rapist and a murder case, and the criminal profilers gave more accurate descriptions of the offender in the rapist case, but no more accurate descriptions than other groups of the offender in the murder case. In another experiment, criminal profilers did well at describing offenders, but did not prove to be consistently good at their jobs. The profilers showed the most variance in their ability to profile criminals out of any of the groups who were tested. The group who did the second best at profiling was a group of college students in science, which leads many to believe that overall logical reasoning is required to be skilled in profiling. Links: http://www.apa.org/monitor/julaug04/criminal.aspx http://www.apa.org/monitor/julaug04/profiling.aspx...
  • Posted How does Violence in the Media Affect Families? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    The effect media violence has on families and the general public is an ongoing debate. Some scientists insist that violence in the media directly influences and shapes children's personality. Michael Suman, the Coordinator of the Center of Communications Policy at the University of California at Los Angeles, did a study on the effects of violence in media and drew a few conclusions. His conclusions were that violence on television increases violent behavior in people, desensitizes people from violence, and increases fear, and that children are more vulnerable to all these negative effects. However, many scientists would argue with Suman's claims and say that he could be confusing correlation and causation. It is possible that viewing violent television may cause people to have more violent behaviors, but it is also true that people with more violent personalities are more likely to watch violent television. Some of the claims are also hard to falsify. For instance, the claim that violent television increases fear in people would be extremely hard to falsify, because there are so many different things that could contribute to a person being fearful. Suman's exact claims can be found here: http://www.christiananswers.net/q-eden/edn-f012.html...
  • Posted Lucid Dreaming In Inception to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    When I first read about lucid dreaming in chapter 5 of the Lilienfeld textbook, my mind immediately jumped to the concept behind one of my favorite films directed by Christopher Nolan, "Inception". I decided to look further into lucid dreaming because of how much it intrigued me. The textbook describes lucid dreaming as the experience of becoming aware that one is dreaming. The book also says that a survey showed 72 percent of people who lucid dream are able to control what happens in their dream. After further investigating lucid dreaming, I found a website that acts as a "how to" guide. The first steps are to start remembering dreams by waking up slowly and immediately recalling your dreams. You are then supposed to start recording your dreams in a journal. After you get better at recalling dreams, you must become increasingly familiar with the characteristics of your dreams. Most people have specific people, places, and situations that reoccur within their dreams, and recognizing these "dream signs" will further improve dream recall. After that, a person must pay attention to their surroundings in real life to become more aware, which will in turn make them more aware within their dreams. When you finally do become consciously aware during a dream, there are certain ways you can check to make sure that you are actually in a dream. The "common sense" technique is the most useful, which consists of observing your surroundings and seeing if there is anything that could obviously not occur in real life. The "reading check" technique is another really easy check to do. To do it, you look at something with writing on it, look away, and then look back. If you are in a dream, the content of the writing will most likely be different when you look back the second time. This somewhat crappy quality video shows how "Inception" describes the "memory check" method, where a person thinks back to see if there are any inconsistencies within their recent memory. Cobb explains that people often can't remember the beginning of their dreams, because they always wind up in the middle of the action. He then asks Ariadne if she remembers how they got to the cafe they are at during the scene. to "How to Lucid Dream"...
  • Posted Do Smarter People Have Less Sex? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Rosemary Hopcroft, a sociologist at the University of North Carolina, has made the claim that "intelligence is negatively associated with sex frequency". Her claim is proven true by the most recent National Survey of Family Growth, in which men with college degrees reported to have had a significantly lower number of sexual partners in the past year than men with only a high school diploma. A health scientist at the Center for Disease Control, Anjani Sandra, and a professor at UNC, Carolyn Halpern, have both looked into this observation. Halpern's studies have shown that many teenagers with the highest intelligence are also virgins, and she assumes these tendencies carry on into adulthood. She says that the reason for this tendency may be because these teens are aware of the consequences promiscuity might have on their future. Chandra, however, says that while this makes sense for these teens not having sex, it does not account for the fact that the same teens are also less likely to have kissed someone, since kissing would obviously not have a negative effect on their future. Chandra also says this reasoning only makes sense for scholarly teenagers, not intelligent adults who already have jobs and are also having less sex. In my opinion, it is incredibly hard to make assumptions based on the observation that smarter people have less sex. Halpern may be confusing causation with correlation in that the assumes these individuals are having less sex because they are intelligent, when in fact a third factor could account for both. For instance, it is entirely possible that these people felt pressured my authority figures growing up to do well academically and abstain from having sex, and these tendencies stayed with them through adulthood. It also could be that the more intelligent people spend more time doing other things, such as studying or working, and feel like they have less time for engaging in sexual behavior. It is also a possibility that in the case of the national survey, men with college degrees were for some reason less likely to admit to having as many sexual partners as men with only high school education, or maybe the men with a high school education lied and said they had more sexual partners than they actually had. The link to the article can be found here More statistics on the matter can be found here...
  • Posted Serial Killers Shaped by Society? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    A sociologist and criminologist at the University of Alberta, Kevin Haggerty, claims his new research proves that serial killers are not shaped by psychological factors, but by society. Haggerty says that as a whole, psychology has made little to no progress in understanding serial killers. He claims that in his research he has found that in many cases, serial murderers choose their victims based on the individuals that society deems unwanted. The example he gives is Robert Pickton from Vancouver, who chose victims who all happened to be female prostitutes. Haggerty also says that the fame serial killers get from the media may provoke more fame-seeking individuals to pursue the act of killing. Many, including myself, would disagree with these findings completely. In the case of society playing a factor in how serial killers choose their victims, Haggerty may be confusing correlation with causation. Just because society alienates a certain group of people, and some serial killers victimize that same group of people, does not mean that the serial killers victimize these people BECAUSE of their alienation. It very well could be that the two factors have little to do with one another. Also, Haggerty's "research" on the effects of fame on serial killers is not very replicable. Eric Hickey, a sociologist and criminal psychologist, pointed out that only some serial killers seem to be motivated by fame and society. He gives examples of killers like Jeffrey Dahmer and Gary Ridgway, both very well known serial killers who were not interested in their killings being publicized, to show that Haggerty's "findings" do not provide an explanation for why serial killers do what they do. It is more realistic to assume that serial killers do what they do based on a combination of factors relating to both nature and nurture. The article about Haggerty's ideas can be found here: http://news.discovery.com/human/serial-killer-society.html View a video about why some psychologists believe more men are serial killers than women here: http://investigation.discovery.com/videos/most-evil-secrets-of-murder.html...
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