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kehne004

  • Posted Black Friday Mobs and Social Psychology to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/257674/20111129/black-friday-turns-deadly-hundreds-left-unconscious.htm (Check out the videos at the bottom of the link!) Every year the stories about Black Friday get scarier and scarier - crazy moms getting physical over Xbox consoles, people pepper spraying one another, workers getting crushed and killed by large stampeding crowds - and the list goes on. A social psychologist might ask themself - what causes these normally sane and well behaved citizens to act so outrageously? Chapter thirteen, Social Psychology, gives us the resources to analyze these behaviors from a social psychological standpoint. Social Psychology is the study of how people influence others' behaviors, beliefs and attitudes (Lillienfeld, 494). By studying how people influence one another we can understand how large groups of people can adverse affects on the individual. The following concepts help us better understand group behavior: 1) Deindividuation: tendency of people to engage in uncharacteristic behavior when they are stripped of their usual identities. 2) Diffusion of Responsibility: Reduction in feelings of personal responsibility in the presence of others. a. The more people present in a crowd, the less responsibility each person feels for the negative actions of the group. (Lillienfeld, chapter 13) By deidividuating and diffusing responsibility throughout a mob of black Friday shoppers it is easier to understand how people can get out of control. Other factors such as arousal and frustration can also lead people towards aggressive behavior....
  • Posted Divorce, and it's Long-Term Effects on Children to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Source: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.174-1617.1998.tb00519.x/pdf For this blog post I read the findings of a longitudinal study on the affects of divorce on children. For this study, the behaviors and attitudes of approximately 30 children who, at the time of separation, were between 2½ and 6 years old, were studied over a 25-year period. The researchers decided to study this age group because it is at this age that children are very dependent on their parents, both emotionally and physically, and they are less able to comfort themselves or seek out comfort elsewhere. All of the children came from families in northern California, and had no previous records of psychological issues. Before I tell you what the results were, I would like to point out an error in this study. Because the researchers chose children from the same geographical area, with similar backgrounds, the conclusions that they developed about how divorce affects children cannot be generalized to the entire population. Perhaps the parents of different cultures would act differently after the divorce, which would then affect the children differently. The results of this study are very interesting. The researchers found that: 1) Immediately after the parents separated, many of the children feared being abandoned by both parents. They felt that if the parents could leave each other, they could just as easily leave the child. They feared waking up to a deserted home, coming home from school to a deserted home, and other things such as starvation. a. Interestingly, these fears turned into reality for many of the children. In most families, the father was gone and the mother was forced to work full-time, leaving the children with strangers or older siblings. Many of the children reported feeling lonely. 2) As they reached adolescence, many children were vulnerable in dealing with their own sexuality and aggression. They were less resistant to drugs and alcohol and many of the women became sexually active in their early teen years. 3) Children who witnessed violence in their parents failing relationship tended to end up in abusive relationships later in life. The affects of divorce on the children in this study are very apparent and certainly hindered them as they grew older. This study suggests a reform to the legal system and better support for children who are dealing with divorce parents....
  • Posted Classical Condition in Popular Culture to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Learning is the change in an organism's behavior or thought as a result of experience). Classical conditioning is a form of learning in which an organism comes to associate stimuli. There are four components of classical conditioning: a) Unconditioned Stimulus: Stimulus that generates an automatic response b) Unconditioned Response: Automatic response to a non- neutral stimulus. c) Conditioned stimulus: Neutral stimulus that generates a learned response through repeated pairing of stimuli. d) Conditioned Response: Learned response which was previously associated with the non-neutral stimulus. In the case of Pavlov's dogs, the unconditioned stimulus was the meat powder, which stimulated the unconditioned response, salivation. The metronome, the conditioned stimulus, could generate a conditioned response, salivation, after being paired repeatedly with the unconditioned stimulus, meat. (Lilienfeld, 202). Watch: http://vimeo.com/5371237 Classical conditioning can be applied to the video found on the link above. The unconditioned stimulus (the non-neutral stimulus) is Jim asking Dwight if he wants a mint. The unconditioned response (the automatic response) is Dwight reaching out to get the mint. The conditioned stimulus (the neutral stimulus) is the beep on the computer which Jim paired repeatedly with asking Dwight if he wanted a mint. Finally (the conditioned response) the learned response, is Dwight reaching out for a mint after hearing the beep on the computer....
  • Posted Classical Condition in Popular Culture to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Learning is the change in an organism's behavior or thought as a result of experience). Classical conditioning is a form of learning in which an organism comes to associate stimuli. There are four components of classical conditioning: a) Unconditioned Stimulus: Stimulus that generates an automatic response b) Unconditioned Response: Automatic response to a non- neutral stimulus. c) Conditioned stimulus: Neutral stimulus that generates a learned response through repeated pairing of stimuli. d) Conditioned Response: Learned response which was previously associated with the non-neutral stimulus. In the case of Pavlov's dogs, the unconditioned stimulus was the meat powder, which stimulated the unconditioned response, salivation. The metronome, the conditioned stimulus, could generate a conditioned response, salivation, after being paired repeatedly with the unconditioned stimulus, meat. (Lilienfeld, 202). Watch: http://vimeo.com/5371237 Classical conditioning can be applied to the video found on the link above. The unconditioned stimulus (the non-neutral stimulus) is Jim asking Dwight if he wants a mint. The unconditioned response (the automatic response) is Dwight reaching out to get the mint. The conditioned stimulus (the neutral stimulus) is the beep on the computer which Jim paired repeatedly with asking Dwight if he wanted a mint. Finally (the conditioned response) the learned response, is Dwight reaching out for a mint after hearing the beep on the computer....
  • Posted Marijuana and the Brain: How it Works to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Lilienfeld gave us a lot of good information about marijuana on pages 193-194, but after reading this section I asked myself "How exactly does marijuana work?" I turned to the Internet, and this is what I found. Most of us are aware that the main chemical found in marijuana that affects users is called THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol). THC mimics the effects of anandamide, a neurotransmitter found naturally in our brains, by binding to the cannabinoid receptors. Cannabinoid receptors are vast in the hippocampus, cerebellum, basal ganglia, and the hypothalamus. As we have learned in previous chapters the hippocampus is responsible for memory, the cerebellum is responsible for balance control and coordinated movements, the basal ganglia is responsible for movement control, and the hypothalamus is responsible for motivation, emotion, and hunger regulation. Within seconds of inhaling THC, it has reached the brain and begins to attack these areas. This is why users have a hard time remembering things, controlling their emotions, and controlling their appetite....
  • Posted Conversion Therapy and Pseudoscience to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    When I Googled "list of topics characterized as pseudoscience" a large list came up ranging from Astrology to Feng Shui. One of these topics, conversion therapy, really interested me. According to the American Psychological Association, conversion therapy is a type of therapy aimed at changing sexual orientation. Conversion therapy's practices are based on the assumption that homosexuality is a mental condition. Through various techniques, such as electric shock to the hands and genitals, administration of nausea- inducing drugs in conjunction with homoerotic stimulation, social skills training, prayer, and group support, patients attempt to rid themselves of their homosexual attractions. Although this is practiced throughout many religious organizations, medical professionals and scientists agree that conversion therapy is virtually useless as well as potentially harmful. It is now considered pseudoscientific by most. According to a column written by Damon Suden, "The potential risks of 'conversion therapy' are great, including depression, anxiety and self-destructive behavior, since therapist alignment with societal prejudices against homosexuality may reinforce self-hatred already experienced by the patient." The idea that conversion therapy is a pseudoscience is strengthened by the fact that it is very reliant on anecdotal claims, lacks review and replication, and does not connect to other research. For example, it is widely accepted that homosexuality is not a mental condition and cannot be scientifically proven to be one. Sources: http://tech.mit.edu/V119/N11/col2.11c.html http://abcnews.go.com/2020/story?id=3634484&page=1 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conversion_therapy...
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