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krebs120

  • Posted 5 years from now to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    5 years from now, the psychology concept I will most likely remember is the Dutton & Aron bridge study, maybe not the names of the psychologists who performed the study, but definitely the concept behind the study. The concept behind the Dutton and Aron bridge study is a useful one. It comes from the two-factor theory which is a "theory proposing that emotions are produced by an undifferentiated state of arousal along with an attribution (explanation) of that arousal (Lilienfeld 412). It says that situations that cause high states of arousal produce certain emotions. Dutton and Aron's bridge study helped prove this theory. They had a male-female encounter on either a stable bridge or a swaying bridge. The female asked the males a survey and then provided the males with her phone number in case they had any questions. 30% of males in the stable bridge condition called the female, and 60% of males in the swaying bridge study called her. This finding can be useful in everyday life. If trying to meet a lady or gentlemen, you may be so inclined to participate in arousing situations such as rock climbing, or snow boarding, or any activities which cause a large amount of arousal. If your current relationship is fizzling, it may help to do something exciting with your partner to reignite those flames....
  • Posted Attachment Theory to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    I am currently in a relationship and I found Attachment theory to be very interesting. The basis behind Attachment theory is the idea that humans need to develop and retain stable relationships. "According to attachment theory (Bowlby, 1969), infants and adults experience the same sequence of emotional reactions when separated from their attachment figures" (Lecture 11/18/11). This concept is important because it showed how couples interact after being separated. There were some unique findings from these studies done by Professor Simpson that showed that certain attachment styles led to more successful relationships than other attachment styles. This is what was particularly interesting to me. I believe I have a secure attachment style with my current partner, but at times I think I exhibit different attachment styles. My girlfriend actively seeks support and I give her support. So according to this, that would mean I have a secure attachment style with my girlfriend. I feel like in different situations and at different times in your life, people would have different attachment styles. People can learn to depend on others (secure) or learn that they cannot depend on others (avoidant). Maybe a couple has a really bad breakup and they have trouble trusting others and take on an avoidant attachment style. So wouldn't it make sense that someone could have all of these attachment styles at any point in their life? Someone has a secure attachment style with one close friend and an avoidant attachment style with another? So instead of just labeling a person as having a secure attachment style, shouldn't there instead be some sort of scoring involved, like in a personality assessment?...
  • Posted The Mozart Effect to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    The Mozart Effect is the supposed boost in intelligence after listening to classical music (Lilienfeld 377). This concept is important because I have learned of the Mozart Effect prior to this class and always thought of it to be true. Whenever I study, I usually listen to classical music, rather than music with lyrics or words in it, so as to boost my studying ability I guess. My Dad always has asked me if I listen to music when I study. Usually when I am doing math-based homework, I can listen to any type of music. When I am reading or studying for a quiz or an exam, I usually listen to classical music or instrumental music on a very low volume, kind of just background noise. I guess I have done this because my Dad has always suggested it. Further research on the Mozart effect has shown that it is hard to replicate and is falsifiable. The simpler explanation is that the music arouses the participant greater than listening to other composers or silence. So does studying with music allow you to perform better when having to retrieve information? Or is it better to study with no music? I guess it would depend on the person. In the book it says that it showed no long-term effect on overall intelligence. I could see how listening to music would not be helpful when you are studying because of stimuli overload, and you may get distracted. One may suffer from state-dependent or context-dependent learning when taking an exam if they studied while listening to music, which caused arousal because they wouldn't be able to listen to music while taking the exam....
  • Posted Infantile amnesia and false memories to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    According to the text, "Infantile amnesia is the inability of adults to retrieve accurate memories before an early age". I have this clear memory of a house we lived in when I was 0-1 years of age. I remember a pond in our backyard and these muskrats that occupied this pond. I told my parents about this and they said this was accurate. So according to infantile amnesia, this is not possible. So I am wondering where I got this memory. In the second paragraph on infantile amnesia, the text says, "it's almost certainly...a false memory". So according to the text, this memory of a pond in my backyard is a false memory. I do not remember when or where I got this memory. This is known as source monitoring confusion or as the Lilienfeld text says, "a lack of clarity about the origin of a memory". I may have seen a picture when I was younger of our old backyard and asked my parents about it, or my parents may have told me about this at a younger age. I am not sure. I wonder how many people have memories of before they were 2-3 and if they actually are trustworthy or not. Has anyone else experienced this, and what was the memory of? Are these types of memories usually episodic memories, explicit memories or implicit memories? My memory would be classified as an episodic memory I believe....
  • Posted Remembering Dreams to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    I rarely remember my dreams when I wake up in the morning, and I have always wondered why this was so. I heard a while back that REM sleep had a lot to do with dreaming. Most nights I usually wake up 4-6 times a night for short periods of time. I always thought that I was waking up right before REM sleep and that's why I wasn't dreaming. After reading the Stage 5: REM Sleep and Dreams section in chapter five in the Lilienfeld text, I found out a little more about my predicament. According to the Lilienfeld text, REM Sleep is the stage of sleep during which the brain is most active and during which vivid dreaming most often occurs. In a study where rats were deprived of REM sleep, the rats ended up dying within a few weeks. So my hypothesis already seems bogus because if I were actually being deprived of REM sleep I would eventually die. In the textbook, Lilienfeld talks about REM Rebound: when humans are deprived of REM sleep, the amount and intensity of REM sleep increases. When we have REM rebound, our dreams are very intense and vivid. So there is this natural response to REM deprivation that causes us to have even more vivid dreams. These REM rebounds are associated with great nights of sleep and I have had these, but I usually don't remember my dreams. In the text it says, a lot of people say they never dream. The text also says that when someone is woken up out of REM sleep, most of them report having vivid dreams. Maybe I don't wake up that often when I am in REM sleep. So I do not remember dreaming. In the text, there is a statistic that says that "children under the age of seven or eight recall dreaming on only 20-30% of occasions when awakened from REM sleep compared with 80 to 90 percent of adults. So this probably shows that I usually don't awaken during REM sleep, so I don't remember dreams I was just having....
  • Posted How antidepressants work to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Some antidepressants work by increasing neurotransmitters released (MAOIs). Some block neurotransmitter clearance (Tricyclics, SSRIs). Prozac, or Fluoxetine, is an SSRI, or serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, that reduces the reuptake of serotonin from the synapse. This makes it so the neurotransmitter stays in the receptor for a longer period of time, lengthening the overall effect of the serotonin. Serotonin plays roles in sleep cycles, aggression, and mood and temperature regulation. How antidepressants work is an important concept because many people are affected by depression. I know people close to me that have suffered from depression and have also been prescribed antidepressants, so this topic is very relevant to me. I know depression relates to a chemical imbalance in the brain, but is depression caused by this chemical imbalance? What are some other possible causes of depression? Could drug abuse relate to depression? Genetics may be a possible answer to the cause of depression. Some people may not produce as much serotonin or norepinephrine, which both affect mood. The prefrontal cortex is the part of the frontal lobe that is responsible for thinking. I know people who are depressed, often have this downward spiral way of thinking. They start thinking negatively about themselves and have a hard time getting out of that way of thinking. Maybe an underdeveloped prefrontal cortex relates to depression in some way. The limbic system of the brain is known as the emotional center of the brain. I would imagine that the limbic system could be linked somehow to depression....
  • Posted How antidepressants work to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Some antidepressants work by increasing neurotransmitters released (MAOIs). Some block neurotransmitter clearance (Tricyclics, SSRIs). Prozac, or Fluoxetine, is an SSRI, or serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, that reduces the reuptake of serotonin from the synapse. This makes it so the neurotransmitter stays in the receptor for a longer period of time, lengthening the overall effect of the serotonin. Serotonin plays roles in sleep cycles, aggression, and mood and temperature regulation. How antidepressants work is an important concept because many people are affected by depression. I know people close to me that have suffered from depression and have also been prescribed antidepressants, so this topic is very relevant to me. I know depression relates to a chemical imbalance in the brain, but is depression caused by this chemical imbalance? What are some other possible causes of depression? Could drug abuse relate to depression? Genetics may be a possible answer to the cause of depression. Some people may not produce as much serotonin or norepinephrine, which both affect mood. The prefrontal cortex is the part of the frontal lobe that is responsible for thinking. I know people who are depressed, often have this downward spiral way of thinking. They start thinking negatively about themselves and have a hard time getting out of that way of thinking. Maybe an underdeveloped prefrontal cortex relates to depression in some way. The limbic system of the brain is known as the emotional center of the brain. I would imagine that the limbic system could be linked somehow to depression....
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