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Chris Perdoni

  • Commented on Question Submission 14 (Last One)
    "Does this seem like an effective approach to take; having a disconnection over which time period the parts contributing to cancer are focused? Seeing that most contemporary cancer research methods take a reductionist approach, maybe they should consider subsequently studying...
  • Commented on Question Submission 14 (Last One)
    After reading Prof. Waters’ ‘Beyond Theoretical Reduction and Layer-Cake Antireduction,’ I’m having difficulty in piecing together the two main discussions. The first discussion deals with how the two opposing views of theoretical reduction and layer-cake antireduction go astray – Waters...
  • Commented on Question Submission 13
    Would changing the definition of biology to 'structures/systems of chemicals' alter biology in any critical ways? That's an interesting question, and one I've thought about often over the course of this semester. I don't think it would alter biology in...
  • Commented on Question Submission 13
    In Professor Wimsatt’s “Reductive Explanation: A Functional Account,” it is discussed to what extent reductionism fits into the general scope of scientific inquiry. Wimsatt states, “While Schaffner (1974b) has questioned whether trying to accomplish the reductionist program per se is...
  • Commented on Question Submission 12
    1) I disagree that genetics is 'ruled by biology.' If evolution is a process of natural selection - that is, a process that gives organisms with a higher fitness an increased chance of reproduction - then it would be contradictory...
  • Commented on Question Submission 12
    Using the guidelines set forth by Schaffner, Hull lays out numerous examples throughout Chapter 1 of his 1974 book to demonstrate the difficulty in reducing Mendelian genetics to molecular genetics. Although certain examples meet Schaffner’s specifications, there are many that...
  • Commented on Question Submission 11
    When Schaffner says that biology can be reduced to chemistry and physics, my impression was that he meant a consecutive reduction - that is, from biology to chemistry and from chemistry to physics. While on the biological level it may...
  • Commented on Question Submission 10
    Now that the blog is up and running again, I'll post my question response from Week 10 as a formality. 'Does our strong desire to follow the scientific method, and use it as a means to scientific discovery, sometimes get...
  • Commented on Question Submission 11
    Schaffner (1969) states that the goal of his paper is ‘to argue that the development of the implications of the Watson-Crick model have given us persuasive scientific reasons for believing that biology is nothing more than chemistry (p. 326-7).’ Although...
  • Commented on Question Submission 10
    The discovery of DNA’s double-helix structure in 1953 by Watson and Crick (or Franklin, if you prefer) was without question an important finding in the history of not only molecular biology, but for science as a whole. However, providing the...
  • Commented on Question Submission 9
    What good is a theory, even if it points in the correct direction, if no one knows about it?) This is an interesting question. I think the importance of a theory is, in fact, dependent on who knows about it...
  • Commented on Question Submission 9
    The work of George Beadle and Edward Tatum in the early 1940’s implied that each step in a metabolic pathway is controlled by a single gene as well as a single enzyme – leading to the one gene-one enzyme hypothesis...
  • Commented on Question Submission 8
    Based on my understanding of what the wild-type phenotype represents, it's not necessarily used as a link between what's found in the lab and what occurs in nature (i.e. when scientists use a wild-type phenotype, they aren't doing so in...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    In Chapter 3 of Prof. Waters’ manuscript, differences are drawn between theory-driven research and exploratory research. Theory-driven research is set up in a way that restricts the ranges of intervention by the experimenter(s) and seeks to relate the observed phenomena...
  • Commented on Question Submission 6
    Since you're referring to a causal relationship within a small population group that contains specific characteristics, I think it would be extremely difficult to apply those relationships to any population that contains a different set of characteristics. Your group of...
  • Commented on Question Submission 6
    Professor Waters’ depiction of Morgan and co.’s experimental procedure states that it didn’t ‘depend on indentifying the material make-up, mode of action, or general function of the underlying purple gene (Waters, manuscript pg. 6).’ Rather, Morgan’s approach was only concerned...
  • Commented on Question Submission 5
    I believe that in order for a process to have material overlap, there needs to be actual physical pieces that get inherited from one point to the next. The mechanisms the virus use in order to enter its genome into...
  • Commented on Question Submission 5
    My question arises from Prof. Griesemer’s ‘The Units of Evolutionary Transition’ paper and his lecture last Thursday. The lecture states that an evolutionary transition ‘is the evolution of a new biological organization,’ e.g. the transition to a multi-cellular organism state...
  • Commented on Question Submission 4
    While sex is technically determined upon fertilization, it isn't discernible until later on in embryonic development, as you noted. The general reasons for this, as far as I've been taught, is that the first regions to develop in the embryo...
  • Commented on Question Submission 4
    This submission deals more with a question about the content of Griesemer’s passage rather than a particular implication stemming from the reading. As stated in the beginning of the section ‘Mendel as a Developmentalist,’ Griesemer states that his goal is...
  • Commented on Question Submission 3
    My interpretation of Boveri's statement on chromosomal numbers is that he believed an organism could develop normally as long as it contained the minimal number of chromosomes which carry the essential qualities of that organism. Any additional number of chromosomes...
  • Commented on Question Submission 3
    Boveri’s work in the early 1900’s, as mentioned in class, was a later foundation for a number of different hypotheses/predictions. Not only were his results significant, but his methodological approach to the experiment was quite ingenious. The only manipulations Boveri...
  • Commented on Question Submission 2
    It's interesting to think about how the momentum shifted in the late 1800's from observational differences to similarities. I'm not sure any one thing 'created' this momentum shift, but it seems to be the byproduct of what was being sought...
  • Commented on Question Submission 2
    While Mendel’s work with pea plants was undoubtedly important to the pioneering concepts of genetics, Mendel himself was interested in the science of hybridization. As a result of this, he designed his experiment using plants that would best display dominant...
  • Commented on Question Submission 1
    I cannot speak on behalf of Darwin, but my impression of his intentions for applications of his theory seem mainly descriptive. He seemed driven to understand the mechanisms in nature that resulted in speciation and to give current examples for...
  • Commented on Question Submission 1
    As mentioned in the 'Explanation and Evolution Among the Greeks' handout (p. 2), Aristotle believed that a binary branching tree of species could be established using the concepts of 'essential' (defining) and 'accidental' (other) traits of a particular organsism. Characteristics...
  • Commented on Trial Run
    Mendel...
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