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leex3176

  • Commented on Question Submission 14 (Last One)
    The idea of seeking an explanation of a phenomena within a layer with the simplest or most fundamental pieces at a particular level is intriguing. However, I think you're right that it does seem this view would pay much attention...
  • Commented on Question Submission 14 (Last One)
    Professor Waters states that, "The chief arguments offered in favor of layer-cake antireductionism in genetics fail to correspond to the actual science." The reasons pro layer-cake antireductionists give for the view that classical genetics will never be reduced, eliminated, or...
  • Commented on Question Submission 13
    In Wimsatt's essay, "Reductive Explanation: A Functional Account," he talks about successional reduction and replacement. He states that, "Replacement and successional reduction are opposites. But for explanatory reductions, replaceability is closer to and is by many treated as a synonym...
  • Commented on Question Submission 12
    I also think that statement is false. I haven't taken genetics yet, but I am a biology student. In general biology courses, many aspects of genetics are talked about, such as chromosomes, DNA and RNA, genes, etc. Because of that,...
  • Commented on Question Submission 12
    Hull brings up the idea of 'revolutionary science' and 'normal science.' I don't really see a need for the distinction between 'revolutionary' and 'normal' science. In both cases, changes are happening in the sciences. A theory is either getting completely...
  • Commented on Question Submission 11
    Schaffner talks about the first attempts at constructing reduction functions and how connections between entities in two theories are introduced at first, while others are introduced later as the reduction is further developed. He states, "This non-simultaneous establishment of reduction...
  • Commented on Question Submission 10
    Thursdays lecture got me thinking. I was surprised when Professor love said that the scientific method is taught to students incorrectly. I didn't even know there were other ways of teaching the scientific method. I thought the scientific method I...
  • Commented on Question Submission 9
    The statements you quoted from Morange, intrigued me when I read them. Morange probably has different reasons for making his claim of genetics developing from it's separation from other disciplines. Genetics definitely received a "boost" when it separated from other...
  • Commented on Question Submission 8
    I don't think Professor Waters is saying that one type of mapping is more valid or more important than the others. I think the idea of locating certain genes is just as important as the other types of mapping. Different...
  • Commented on Question Submission 8
    In Chapter 3 of Professor Waters' manuscript he states that, "The typical philosophical approach to analyzing a body of scientific knowledge places so much stress on theory, explanation, and modeling, that it obscures the nature of the body of scientific...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    I don't think that fact poses a problem to the discipline of scientific study. Even though science may be less knowledgeable than they put on, we are still able to do great things with it. Like you said, lives have...
  • Commented on Question Submission 7
    My question is from Chapter 3 of Professor Waters' manuscript. Professor Waters states that, "The research program of classical genetics can't be understood by viewing it through a theory-biased lens of traditional epistemologies of science. Then from class on Tuesday,...
  • Commented on Question Submission 6
    You bring up a good question about what reproduction is. I don't think that, "calling reproduction the actual act of replicating the DNA which leads to a new organism" is an oversimplification of reproduction. It seems to me that, instead...
  • Commented on Question Submission 6
    During Professor Griesemer's lecture on Thursday, he spoke about the idea of looking at material overlap in terms of resolution. When one looks at the retrovirus in terms of high resolution, there is overlap, but when one looks at the...
  • Commented on Question Submission 5
    My question comes from the Godfrey-Smith reading, "Reproduction and Individuality." I'd like to bring up the "quaking aspen" tree. According to Mitton and Grant, "What look like hundreds or thousands of distinct trees scattered across many acres will in fact...
  • Commented on Question Submission 4
    This brings up an important/interesting fact about science. Progress can't really be made unless a person thinks differently and/or questions the established norms in science. I think Boveri was doing what great minds like Darwin and Einstein did by raising...
  • Commented on Question Submission 3
    My question comes from reading William Wimsatt's 2006 paper. In Wimsatt's paper, he brings up Jaegwon Kim, a person that deals with metaphysics and the like with theories like the psycho-physical identity theory, dualism, and epiphenomenalism. Wimsatt makes the comment...
  • Commented on Question Submission 2
    During lecture last Thursday, someone brought up the fact that Mendel isn't necessarily a geneticist. After reading Gregor Mendel's Experiments on Plant Hybridization, I have to say that I'm a little confused about whether or not Mendel was indeed into...
  • Commented on Question Submission 1
    I think that a little bit of both had to do with Darwin not applying evolution to man in his book, On The Origin of Species. Being religious, Darwin didn't want to upset religious people by applying evolution to man....
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