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butle428

  • Posted It Makes Sense In My Head to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    In chapter thirteen of the Lilienfeld text it covers the subject of conformity. We discussed this topic in discussion, but we focused a lot on the aspect of action conformity. If you recall we watched the video with the people in the elevator who conformed to the odd facing direction. I thought that was very interesting, but what is even more interesting to me is conformity that is not so public and more a personal conformity.. This is hard to put into words and may seem but confusing, but maybe I can bring you to my level of thinking for a while. The man conforming in the elevator displayed his conformity publicly, people could see it, but right now I'm focused on an inner conformity. Here is an example from the text. When Walt Disney died, many people believed that he had himself frozen to be thawed and brought back to life in the future when technology permitted it (Lilienfeld, 2010). Now, a lot of people believed this, and even I had caught wind of this rumor and thought it was legit for a while. But when I heard this and believed it, there was no one around me to pressure me into believing it, I simply accepted it because it seemed logical. Disney had an enormous fortune to his name, and could pay for any such procedure. This leads me to believe that conformity, though part of SOCIAL psychology, doesn't always need to be in a social situation. Conformity appears to be prevalent in a multitude of personal situations. To conclude I want to point out and make sure that what I'm trying to convey, is conveyed. Many people believe that conformity only happens in social, group settings. Someone does something, and another person conforms to that. But, I'm trying to point out that it seems many people will conform to something, even when there is nobody anywhere near them... it's hard for me to explain, but it makes sense in my head....
  • Posted Collective Unconscious: Nothing More Than an Idea to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    In chapter 14 we covered the subject of personality; and who knew that there could be some much involved. One thing that jumped out to me was Jung's idea of a "Collective Unconscious". The book's described this idea as the shared storehouse of memories passed down to us across generations (Lilienfeld, 2010. pg 554). This was interesting to me because it reminded me of a popular video game series called Assassin's Creed. The idea of the game is that a machine accesses memories from a subject, memories encrypted in his DNA that have been passed down through the generations; just like Jung's theory. However, this idea of collective unconscious is not sitting well with me; it doesn't seem possible. Memory is not part of our genetic makeup; memory is created through repetitive stimulation of particular areas of the brain. If it were part of our genetic makeup, you would think that most people would be born with particularly good language skills. Also, Jung's theory isn't even falsifiable, so it really can't even be a scientific theory. The idea is interesting to think about. At first thought it makes complete sense. It would definitely explain why birds know how to fly south in the winter. Unfortunately, if we just apply basic scientific thinking principles, the idea is nothing more than an idea....
  • Posted Being Prosecuted as an Adult to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    While reading chapter ten I came across a particular section and immediately bookmarked it for this blog post. The section was on the cognitive changes in adolescence and it dealt with how the brain develops with age. More importantly though it touched on the subject of how some adolescents are "pardoned" for their crimes because their brains are not fully capable of making good decisions. To this idea I definitely agree. However, I sometimes don't agree with how the law handles this. The law generally considers adults as eighteen years of age and older, but sometimes younger teens can be convicted as adults depending on the case, and how hard the prosecutors push to try the defendant as an adult. The way I believe it should work is that there should be rules "set in stone" about how this works. I believe that for certain crimes, committed at certain ages, it should be required that the defendant be prosecuted as an adult. For example, many teens 16-17 years old commit attempts of murder every year, and find themselves using the excuse of "my brain isn't fully developed yet" as a way of getting barely anytime in jail, and back on the streets. If there were more specific rules on age and crime serious crimes like attempted murder could be dealt with more effectively. Any normally developed teen at the age of 15, 16 or 17 should know that killing somebody is wrong, and if they decide to try and kill somebody, they should be punished like somebody who is 20, 30, 40, etc....
  • Posted We GIve them Less Credit Than They Deserve to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    In chapter 6 we learned a great deal about the processes and types of learning. There were several examples in the text that focused on how animals learn. When I read these sections about animals, I found it funny how the authors of the text made animals sound less intelligent than humans. An example is from page 228 when it states " a genius of an ape named Sultan, who easy especially adept at solving puzzles. (Lilienfield 2010) My point in this is we give animals less credit than they deserve sometimes. I mean, would we consider a human a "genius" for solving simple tasks? Most likely the answer is no. In my opinion we give animals much less credit than they deserve. So I thought I would look for cases that display evidence that animals can be better learners and problem solvers than humans. In my search I found two good examples in which primates outsmarted a human, in one case the human was me. The first video I found was of a chimp named Ayumu. Ayumu was able to learn Arabic numerals, and then outsmart, or outperform a human in a short term memory task. The task was this. Numbers would appear on a touch screen computer. The numbers would then disappear soon after being displayed, Ayumu than had to touch squares where the numbers appeared in ascending order of the numbers that were previously in that location. When watching the video you can see clearly that the human struggles far more than Ayumu in this task. The second video was very simple. A chimp in given a peanut in a tube that is fixed to the ground. The tube is too long for the chimp to reach with its fingers. As I watched it I had no idea how this chimp would get the peanut out. I thought maybe breaking the tube would be an easy way to do it; but if the tube is to sturdy, and I couldn't break it, than I would have no way of getting the peanut. The chimp however, wasn't as stumped as me. The chimp thought to get water from its drinking supply, and spit the water in the tube, making the peanut float. This in my opinion is an excellent display of animals' intelligence. So the point again is, I think animals are given much less credit than they deserve. For the most part, yes animals are less intelligent than humans, but there are many situations that primates can out smart us in....
  • Posted Waking up in the middle of the night? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Every year there are numerous accounts of people reporting that an alien or something strange visited them in their sleep. These people often wake up from their sleep and report that they had feelings of something pressing down on them, or they felt an eerie presence in the room. This phenomenon is known to psychologists as sleep paralysis. Sleep paralysis in short is the inability to move after falling asleep, or immediately waking up. The condition is often associated with feelings of extreme anxiety and fear. I think this concept of psychology is a very important one to study because so many people suffer from it, and do no not know what to do about it. In my personal experience I have had numerous accounts of waking up in the middle of the night, and not being able to move because I was so terrified that something was in my room. I thought I was going crazy until about a month after when a friend of mine reported having very similar experiences. It was good to know that this isn't an abnormal experience, but I was still inquisitive to what was going on. After some basic studying in the text and some support online, it seems that a basic hypothesis to what happens during sleep paralysis is available. In the simplest terms, what happens is, part of your brain wakes up from the sleep cycle, giving you conscious awareness, but the rest of your brain that controls motor functions is still sleeping. This results in the inability to move which can seem so terrifying, especially in the middle of the night. So next time if you wake up in the middle of the night and think there is something in your room watching you, try to remember that you are most likely suffering from sleep paralysis, and there is nothing to really fear....
  • Posted Facebook to start Charging? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    http://urbanlegends.about.com/b/2011/09/23/facebook-to-start-charging-hoax.htm With social networking on a constant rise, hoaxers see popular sites such as Facebook, twitter, and the more outdated MySpace as good places to attack. If you have a Facebook account, you may have just noticed a viral status floating around that reads "IT IS OFFICIAL. IT WAS EVEN ON THE NEWS. FACEBOOK WILL START CHARGING DUE TO THE NEW PROFILE CHANGES. IF YOU COPY THIS ON YOUR WALL YOUR ICON WILL TURN BLUE AND FACEBOOK WILL BE FREE FOR YOU. PLEASE PASS THIS MESSAGE ON, IF NOT YOUR ACCOUNT WILL BE DELETE ID YOU DO NOT PAY". Not long after this post became viral, another post very similar arose. It seemed to hold stronger "evidence" by declaring the price grid for the new Facebook membership. Many people fell for this trickery, but if they would have just analyzed the situation, and applied the concepts of critical thinking, they would have been able to tell it was a fake. A person could start with the concept of Extraordinary Claims. Is there extraordinary evidence to support this extraordinary claim? The answer is no. The post said, "IT IS OFFICIAL. IT WAS EVEN ON THE NEWS. FACEBOOK WILL START CHARGING DUE TO THE NEW PROFILE CHANGES". The closest thing to evidence in this part of the post is that it says "it was even on the news". This however, is incorrect. One could simply use the internet to find a news website and prove this statement false. There is also evidence that contradicts the entire post completely. The login screen for Facebook says. "It's free and always will be". So next time you see or hear about one of these posts think critically before deciding to pass it on. Be a scientific skeptic and look for the evidence that proves it. Or just remember "it's free and always will be....
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