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golo0029

  • Commented on Appreciation for What We Have
    It is interesting how you mentioned valuing parents and the older generation. This is definitely an interesting concept that is not often discussed. I think this is especially relevant considering the aging population and how health care and technology are...
  • Posted Ironic Answer to Sex, Politics, and Global Hip Hop 2014
    What is the most important issue facing new generations of young people globally? The question itself addresses a major change facing today's youth-globalization. Today's young generations are growing up in a global economy and global world. With technology, transportation, and...
  • Commented on Hip Hop as a Tool for Political Activism
    Thanks for sharing the insightful information about Lowkey. It is great to hear of artists discussing relevant political and social issues. Which songs are your favorites? I would be interested in listening to some anti-war based lyrics. When I was...
  • Posted Global Hip Hop to Sex, Politics, and Global Hip Hop 2014
    My musical knowledge of hip-hop artists is very limited. After reading the prompt for the blog, I realized I could not easily list one non-U.S. artist. Thus, this seemed like a perfect opportunity to research a hip-hop artist from...
  • Commented on A Dancer's Perspective
    Your admiration for female rap artists including Nicki Minaj, provided a great new perspective. To enter a male dominated field, would be challenging for any woman. These artist are role models for young women and prove that an individual's sex...
  • Posted The N-word, Misogyny, and Oprah to Sex, Politics, and Global Hip Hop 2014
    The article by Jeffrey Ogden incorporated ideas such as authenticity and use of the N-word. He states, "While gaining credibility is important to all MCs, few white ones have been able to achieve the ultimate 'ghetto pass': free usage of...
  • Commented on My Story of Hip- Hop
    My parents have also significantly influenced my music choices. They are not advocates of rap music, and would never allow this music genre to be played. Thus, I only started listening to hip-hop music once my older brother started driving...
  • Posted Similarities and Hip Hop to Sex, Politics, and Global Hip Hop 2014
    My understanding of hip hop is limited as I possess minimal knowledge on the subject. Prior to our first day of class, my naive view suggested hip-hop as a music industry only. It clearly has social and political relevance and...
  • Posted Do you remember? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    There are a lot of concepts in psychology that are extremely useful in daily life given that psychology is the study of behavior. Yet, there is one concept I will never forget. The idea that we only remember events that stand out (events we want to remember) seems obvious, but in fact, is a hidden mystery of life. I think this is critical for everyone's lives not only in eliminating and fighting stereotypes/prejudice, but socially. For example, when coming to a new place, such as the University of Minnesota, everyone was anxious to meet new people and form a close group of friends. However, not only do you want to make friends, but in general, people prefer a mutually 'beneficial' relationship. By this, I mean a relationship in which both people are invested. Therefore, in this case, both individuals would make an effort to maintain the friendship. Typically, when I talk to people they are always 'making the effort' to make new friends. However, I think this is because you only remember when you initiate the conversation. This may be due to the fact that it takes a conscientious effort to start the conversation and therefore is easier to remember. (A Rival Hypothesis?) Similarly, when people are frustrated that other individuals are unfriendly and neglect to say hello, they need to recall their position as well. Did they say hi? Have they initiated a friendly greeting? Do we only remember our own seemingly non trivial actions? When will we be able to recognize and remember those same actions in others? In my opinion, this will start when people make an effort to recognize not only their actions but others as well. I think this basic idea has the potential to ease anxiety when it comes to relationships....
  • Posted Are you honest? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Intelligence is a very difficult topic to discuss. This is because some people are naturally better at solving problems and can process information faster than their peers. Yet, we know that intelligence is highly influenced by genetics. Therefore, is it fair to test people based off of their genetics? As we have discussed in lecture, there are multiple views on intelligence. Some people look at overall intelligence while others believe it is a multifaceted construct. Yet, I am not sure we will ever know exactly how to define intelligence. Testing intelligence can be a rather touchy subject especially for juniors and seniors in high school taking the ACT or SAT tests. A low test score could mean rejection from a potential university. I think this raises the following question. If every job is important and every individual unique, why do people always get rewarded for being the most intelligent? Is that really fair? Yet, is that really the question society faces? Sometimes I wonder if it is our priorities that we need to realign. Typically when describing an individual people describe their career and that's how they define success. What if we started defining people through other terms, such as honesty, compassionate, and selfless? Would this change how society views mental/school like intelligence? Furthermore, if society bases success on career, than it seems socioeconomic status which highly correlates with career would also be influenced. Then I wondered, does this influence people's self esteem? If your success is based off career and thus socioeconmic status, will this affect an individual's daily life? To see if there is a correlation between socioeconomic class and careers (intelligence) I decided to do some research. It ends up that Jean Twenge who works in the Psychology Department at San Diego State University, studied self esteem and socioeconomic class. She found that an individual's economic status has a small but significant relationship with self esteem. She also noticed that the effect is very small in young children but continued to grow until age sixty. Therefore, next time you ask someone to describe themselves, maybe try asking something other than their profession. What if society changed and asked something totally different: are you honest?...
  • Posted Is love addictive? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Emotions and Relationships Being in college, relationships including romantic relationships are commonly on the forefront of many people's minds. As we discussed in psychology class, people are romantically attracted towards people similar to themselves, in contrast to the well known proverb that opposites attract. Understanding relationships and behavior between individuals is a primary goal of many psychologists. Yet, how far can we go in studying relationships? Some psychologist have already developed a method to predict if couples will stay together. Furthermore, we have already determined, people of similar wealth, race, religion, attractiveness and education will typically come together. Yet, what types of scientific findings are there in romantic relationships? Are they studying what happens when people are "in love"? In fact, it seems there is scientific research on romantic love being carried out by Helen Fisher. Check out the following link to see a very interesting video. http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/helen_fisher_studies_the_brain_in_love.html Fisher is studying people in love. She has taken fMRI images to see what is happening when people see their loved one. She has found that the Ventral Tegmentum Area (VTA) and Nucleus Accumbens a part of the brain responsible for reward is activated. She compared people in love to those who were recently separated from their loved one. She found that these same areas in the brain had heightened activity in both groups of people. Helen Fisher has decided that love acts on the brain like an addiction. This helps explain why it is so hard for people to forget their old relationships and ex partners. Fisher's next project will also be very interesting. She is going to try to determine why two people fall in love. As we noted in psychology class, proximity and similarity make a difference. However, what if we could determine if two people would make a good match because of their biology? Overall, it seems love still remains a mystery....
  • Posted Alzheimers to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    In psychology lecture we have been discussing memory. Memory is something we typically take for granted. Yet, it is possible to lose our memory. An example of a man that tragically lost his memory is Clive Wearing. Clive suffers from both anterograde and retrograde amnesia. As his wife says, he lives in the moment. His case is very unfortunate. However, we have learned quite a deal from his case. (You can see Clive Wearing interacting with his wife in the link to the video below.) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vwigmktix2Y Even though Clive's condition is relatively uncommon, memory problems afflict numerous people. For instance, Alzheimers condition is relatively widespread effecting approximately 4.5 million Americans today. In 2050 this number is expected to increase to a total of 16 million Americans. Alzheimers leads not only to "personal losses" and hardship, but provides economic hardship as well. Caring for people suffering from Alzheimers in the United States alone costs around $100 billion a year. Therefore, finding the cure/treatment to this disease will not only provide relief to those afflicted with this disease and their loved ones, but it could also eliminate a major financial burden. After learning this, I decided to research what the University of Minnesota is doing to prevent this devastating condition. I learned that the University has a research lab led by Karen Hsia Ashe who has had made important discoveries in Alzheimers research. For example, in 1996 her lab was the birthplace of a transgenic mouse that mimicked the early stages of the disease. This mouse had both memory loss and amyloid-beta plaques , one of the hallmarks of the disease, and is now the most widely used mouse for Alzheimers research in the world. Hopefully the research here at the University of Minnesota and around the world will help mankind tackle this terrible disease. I have seen a family member suffer from Alzheimers and hope this disease will be cured in the future. However, for now, we should learn that memories are never guranteed and that we should not take this amazing phenomenon for granted....
  • Posted Why do we sleep? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Title: Why do we sleep? The biology of sleep is a fascinating subject. The author of the text starts the discussion of sleep with a fact stating that humans spend as much as 1/3 of their lives sleeping. As we determined in our last discussion section, unfortunately, many college students are deprived of this mysterious, yet wonderful phenomenon. However, do we really understand the long term effects of sleep deprivation? What is the significance of sleep? We know short term effects include drowsiness, trouble concentrating, and a possibility of increased vulnerability to irritation and frustration. However, are there long term consequences? In the text it states different ideas as to why sleep is so critical. It may be for memory consolidation, important for the immune system, or merely a conservation of energy. Yet, if the purpose of sleep is to help with a basic biological function, why do we dream? Probably one of the most mysterious yet intriguing topics is dreaming. Why do we remember some and forget others? Do they have meaning in our everyday conscious lives? Is it possible to control our dreams? Or make conclusions from them? So far, it doesn't seem that any type of dream analysis is commonly accepted by the scientific community. Yet, there is research on dreaming. Research is being more accessible because of technology such as EEG and fMRIs. We are able to determine the electrical activity in the brain and see differences in brain waves. It has been determined that the area of the brain most active during dreaming is also the area that controls emotion. (There are still other areas of the brain associated with dreaming.) Yet, even with today's technology we have much to discover. However, the good news is that today people are less likely to make conclusions similar to ancient societies in which dreams were viewed as prophetic messages....
  • Posted The small things in life. to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Every time I learn more science I am always fascinated. I always figured complicated processes were driven by even more complicated "parts." Yet, it is amazing how very basic laws and ideas can produce a very complex system. Take the nervous system as an example. The brain and nervous system combined is arguably the most complex machine in the world. It retains memories, makes new memories, develops, changes, and has a vast amount of potential. Yet, in the end, part of the communication process is due to positively and negatively charged ions and electricity. How can something so basic allow for such complex function? Another amazing concept introduced in the text is the idea of neuroplasticity. The idea that the nervous system can change due to thought, activity, and learning gives every individual the potential to better themselves. It is almost like a "leveling tool." Even though some people are born with extremely high IQs and others with amazing talent for music, maybe there is unknown potential to change what we start with. I wonder, to what extent can we change the brain? Could neuroplasticity be the key to treating learning problems? Finding treatments for neurological disorders? Is there a limit to this seemingly unlimited potential for improvement? I am very excited to see what future research will find. How will both current and new research take advantage of this opportunity? Maybe it will start in education or medicine and become widespread. Take a look at the Arrowsmith school in Canada. It utilizes this idea to help with learning! (check out the video at http://www.arrowsmithschool.org/video-broadband.htm) The woman who founded this school was Barbara Arrowsmith. She herself had many challenges to overcome including poor spatial understanding, a poor working memory, and a difficult grasping concepts. She applied her research on neuroplasticity to improve her life. She even utilized Donald Hebb's theory in which neurons that fire wire together along with the idea of use to improve it. Overall, her approach to therapy is to utilize the parts of the affected brain area to strengthen its original function. After improving her learning ability she founded the Arrowsmith School and is helping kids overcome their learning setbacks. This is a great example of how science and psychology can drastically improve people's lives....
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