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mamro004

  • Posted Unintentionally Remembering to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    When I took psychology in high school, and when I took it here this semester, one subject has always been my favorite and has caught my eye: Inattentional Blindness. We have all seen the video where you are supposed to count the amount of basketball passes made during a short clip. While you are busying counting, a gorilla walks by, and goes unnoticed due to your focus on counting. To me, it seems remarkable how we can so easily overlook strange happenings when our attention is focused elsewhere. While I was still in high school, around Christmas time, I was at the mall with my girlfriend at the time. Yea I know it sucked, but a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do. My girlfriend was looking at boots through a store window. Clearly she was very focused on them because while she was looking, Aaron Rodgers walked by in front of us and she didn't even notice him! (I went to high school in Green Bay) She loves Aaron Rodgers and is familiar with what he looks like. She did not recognize him due to inattentional blindness. My curiosity is, how many strange or extraordinary things might we see in our lifetime that we don't even recognize due to inattentional blindness? http://www.google.com/imgres?q=i+bet+you+didn%27t+notice+the+godzilla&num=10&hl=en&safe=off&gbv=2&biw=1366&bih=667&tbm=isch&tbnid=mGUuEWzRvhNltM:&imgrefurl=http://pigroll.com/811_i-bet-you-didnt-notice-the-godzilla.html&docid=3LREa8gQQS8Q4M&imgurl=http://pigroll.com/img/i_bet_you_didnt_notice_the_godzilla.jpg&w=448&h=580&ei=eSjbTvHdNo3VgAersNzpDA&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=206&vpy=137&dur=3251&hovh=256&hovw=197&tx=78&ty=153&sig=118055108855659728039&sqi=2&page=1&tbnh=171&tbnw=132&start=0&ndsp=22&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0...
  • Posted Defense Mechanisms In Sports to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Defense Mechanisms: Unconscious maneuvers intended to minimize anxiety. According to Freud, our ego engages in using defense mechanisms to deal with anxiety. People use these in everyday life in order to feel better about themselves. If something bad happens to you, just forget it. If you did something wrong, you can blame it on something else. Us, as human beings, subconsciously deceive ourselves so that we can emotionally feel better. This is extremely common in sports. Professional and Varsity athletes are under huge amounts of pressure to perform well. If a professional football player plays poorly, he will not get signed to a contract, and lose out on millions of dollars. If a high school football player plays poorly, he will be the laughing stock of the school and will not score that hot prom date. In order to deal with failures in sports, athletes unconsciously use defense mechanisms. In a football game last year. Wide Receiver, Steve Johnson, dropped the winning touchdown pass. He later went on to blame God on his Twitter account. Asking how "God could do this to me." He is displacing his poor play onto God so he does not feel as bad. As a former high school football player, I have experienced defense mechanisms first hand. I remember players looking at their hands as if they did something wrong after dropping a pass. Personally, I took a hard helmet to helmet hit after catching a pass during a game. This caused me to fumble the ball. I don't know if it was the concussion causing me to forget the play, or my ego trying to REPRESS it, but either way, I do not remember it very well....
  • Posted Emerging Adulthood: College Students to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Emerging adulthood is defined as the period in our lives from the ages 18-25. This is the stage in life where many aspects of emotion develop. This stage particularly applies to college students like us. Although changes in personality also occur, the Emerging Adulthood stage is still different from earlier adolescence. In adolescence, the primary internal conflict is "identity vs. role confusion." For example,in adolescence prior to the Emerging Adulthood stage, I solidified who my friends are, that I still see today. I also could be labeled with an identity as I played sports in high school. Emerging Adulthood is different from earlier adolescence because it deals with internal personal development rather than how we are seen by others in the environment. http://wearemoviegeeks.com/wp-content/animal-house.jpg So right now, it is normal for us to be preoccupied with our own internal personal developments. The Emerging Adulthood stage is categorized by a solidity in personality and life goals. I know for certain that I (at 19 years old) think about my life goal each day. This stage may be due to the fact that it is the age in which we, as colleges students, determine our profession that will impact the rest of our lives. My main question is that if this stage can change based on cultural input. For example, would people living in a culture where youth assume more responsibility at an earlier age undergo the Emerging Adulthood stage earlier in life. Like 15 or 16. Or is the solidity of personality and identity due to biological reasons not occurring until later years. (18-25)...
  • Posted True Life: I've Been Classically Conditioned to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    By now, you already know the concept of classical conditioning. But I'm going to tell it to you anyways. An unconditioned stimulus (US) causes and unconditioned response (UCR). By associating a conditioned stimulus (CS) with a (US), one can achieve a conditioned response (CR). Most of us probably see this as a very simple concept that would only work to teach less intelligent species. This works with dogs (think Pavlov), other animals, and babies (think Baby Albert and his fear of white rats). Most people probably believe that they are "too smart" to fall for this or not to recognize when they are being classically conditioned. However, classical conditioning is all around us; in advertisements, especially. Because of higher-order conditioning, companies can make us feel a certain way towards their product by associating it with something else. This commercial advertises for Old Spice. It uses approval of attractive women as a conditioned stimulus in order to make the consumer want to buy their product. Although most of us don't think about how advertisements try to condition, consumers are affected daily. Humans can apparently be classically conditioned on lower levels too. In this video from the office, Jim classically conditions his co-worker, Dwight. Sorry for the bad video quality. I'm on a horse....
  • Posted Extreme Sleepwalking Stories and the Psychology Behind the Phenomenon to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    On May, 23 1987, Kenneth Parks, a twenty-three year old man with a wife and an infant daughter, drove 10 miles to his in-laws house and killed his mother-in-law as well as injuring his father-in-law. In court he was found NOT GUILTY of murder because he was "unaware of his actions" due to sleepwalking. Now this seems ridiculous. How can someone walk out of their house, drive a car 10 miles, and kill someone? http://www.oddee.com/_media/imgs/articles2/a96680_a448_killedinlaws.jpg Usually when people sleepwalk, they do not engage in any other actions other than walking. When someone is sleepwalking, it usually looks like they are walking normally (maybe a little more clumsily). So for someone to drive a car and commit murder is something extremely uncommon. But with 6 billion people in the world and with 4 to 5% of adults and up to 30% of children having experienced sleepwalking, there are some cases of "extreme sleepwalking." One man is able to create beautiful artwork (but only when he's sleepwalking.) One women has sex with strangers in her "sleep". People have sleepwalked out of their bedroom windows. This website has more examples of extreme sleepwalking. http://www.oddee.com/item_96680.aspx Sleepwalking occurs in the non-REM stages of sleep. Usually in stages 3 and 4 (the deepest stages of sleep.) Sleepwalking is a real thing and occurs naturally. It even occurs with animals. My dog run while he is sleeping, and here is a funny video of a sleepwalking dog. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2BgjH_CtIA Whether you believe that a man could really drive a car and kill someone while still being asleep, or believe that there must be other motives, you cannot deny that sleepwalking is a real, psychological phenomenon....
  • Posted Nature vs. Nurture: What is Responsible for Our Behavior? to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    What shapes human behavior and psychological makeup? Is it genetics, or one's environment? This is the Nature vs. Nurture "debate" that has been such a key idea in psychology. What is the reason for human actions? Does someone become a criminal because they were raised to, or were they inherently born to become one? The answer is both. The Nature vs. Nurture debate is essentially dead, because psychologists have identified both elements to be important in shaping human behavior. For example, I am not a criminal, nor have ever seriously considered committing a crime. Is that because I was born to resist criminal actions, or was it due to the way my parents raised me? I would agree with most psychologists that both of those are reasons for my lack of criminality. Over the summer, I had a real dank part-time job of being a valet for important and ritzy events. I would park wealthy peoples' expensive cars for them. Very cool job. However, what is to prevent me from driving off in a $200,000 Bentley? I would attribute it to two causes: nature and nurture. Nurture because: Both my parents are hard-working and have taught me that stealing is wrong. Also, they have raised me in the Catholic faith, which teaches to "do right" and "thou shall not steal". Nevertheless, while I am sitting in an all leather, tinted windows, decked-out Bentley, I am thinking "Hell yea I want this car!" For a brief moment I think "what would happen if I was to drive off? I would have about a five hour head-start. I could drive to California and sell the car for thousands." But those thoughts are hollow. I would never actually steal the car. I would think that it is morally wrong and I was BORN with enough sense to realize this would not be a smart decision. Most people born with at least an average intelligence would realize the consequences of stealing a car. While I may be able to escape and even sell it, I would be a wanted criminal, and eventually would be caught and wind up in jail. Even if I was never caught, The money would eventually run out, then I would have no source of income opposed to much more income over my career if I continue with schooling. Intelligence is the genetic, nature reason. Environment is the Nurture Reason. This theory (that behavior is caused by both Nature and Nurture) can be applied to every person. We already discussed the Bogle family in class. A family of criminals. All children are born with similar genetics and raised in an abusive environment. Another example is Adam Sandler's character in the movie Billy Madison. He is born to a wealthy family and has everything he could ever need. However, he did not even pass grade school. Why? Due to nature and nurture. He was not born with high intelligence, however he was still very capable of passing grade school. His environment...
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