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schle346

  • Posted What I will remember five years from now... to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    The concept that I will most likely remember five years from now is biological psychology. This was the most interesting topic for me. I really learned a lot about structures in the brain, where certain functions take place, etc. Another concept that I will most likely remember that is very closely associated to biological psychology and the brain is memory. That was also very interesting to learn because memory is a very unpredictable. The reason I will probably remember these subjects better than any of the others is because I want to be a surgeon. As you know, doctors are very interested in the anatomical side of things. The biological side of things is very interesting and easy for me to learn. Memory isn't necessarily related to the specific field I want to study but like I said before, the variability and uncertainty of memory is what makes it such an interesting concept to study. I'm not saying I'll forget all of the research and facts that we've learned about other areas of psychology. I'm saying that the two areas that I will remember the most about is biological psychology and memory....
  • Posted College Admission Tests to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    I think one very relevant and highly debated topic is college admissions tests like the SAT and ACT. A lot of people have wondered how well these tests actually predict academic success in college. Sometimes I don't think my score predicted much of anything. According to an article I found on ABC News, the University of California president wants to get rid of the test as a requirement for admission to their school. I would tend to agree because there have been many problems found with these tests. Such problems are culturally or ethnically biased questions, class biased questions, etc. And, as also stated in the textbook, "...the correlations between these tests and college grades are often below .5 and in a few cases zero." Therefore implying that these tests don't do a very good job of predicting college academic success. So why do colleges still require these tests? These tests miss out on some very key aspects of success in college that should be examined. They don't measure very accurately how well someone is going to be able to adapt socially. Alone, that can sometimes make or break some of your college classes and overall experiences. While some of the aspects measured by the SAT may help you in college success I still think there should be less emphasis placed these tests and more emphasis placed on other characteristics of personality when reviewing an application....
  • Posted College Admission Tests to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    I think one very relevant and highly debated topic is college admissions tests like the SAT and ACT. A lot of people have wondered how well these tests actually predict academic success in college. Sometimes I don't think my score predicted much of anything. According to an article I found on ABC News, the University of California president wants to get rid of the test as a requirement for admission to their school. I would tend to agree because there have been many problems found with these tests. Such problems are culturally or ethnically biased questions, class biased questions, etc. And, as also stated in the textbook, "...the correlations between these tests and college grades are often below .5 and in a few cases zero." Therefore implying that these tests don't do a very good job of predicting college academic success. So why do colleges still require these tests? These tests miss out on some very key aspects of success in college that should be examined. They don't measure very accurately how well someone is going to be able to adapt socially. Alone, that can sometimes make or break some of your college classes and overall experiences. While some of the aspects measured by the SAT may help you in college success I still think there should be less emphasis placed these tests and more emphasis placed on other characteristics of personality when reviewing an application....
  • Posted Eating Disorders to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    I was flipping through the book trying to decide what to write about for this blog entry and stumbled upon eating disorders. So, I went online and typed in eating disorders. As I was scrolling down the page an interesting article appeared. It was an article written by Britt Farwick in the psychology department at Vanderbilt University. This article was about whether or not there is a correlation between people with eating disorders and obsessive compulsive disorder. If you even just think about the characteristics of both of these disorders you can come to some sort of conclusion that most eating disorders and OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) have a strong correlation. Through out the article Farwick found very strong evidence to help support her claim. But, what I found most interesting in the article is that there was another point addressed. It was that since these diseases have such a strong correlation and have very similar characteristics, they could and/or should be classified under a " "family" of disorders called obsessive compulsive spectrum disorder" as stated by the article. In my opinion these should only be classified under one overarching condition if it has been shown that the said person has been diagnosed with an eating disorder, such as anorexia, bulimia, etc. AND has been diagnosed with OCD. As for treatment regarding this "obsessive compulsive spectrum disorder" condition, medical professionals are trying to create one drug that patients would have to take. There have been several tests with a drug called fluoxetine but it hasn't shown effective yet. In summary, this break through would be very helpful in cutting down the amount of medications people with both of these diseases have to take. But, as with many psychological claims, further tests need to be done. Article: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/psychology/health_psychology/ocd.htm...
  • Posted Memory and Amnesia to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    Our textbook defines memory as our ability to retain information over time. Some of us have very good memories and can remember tons of the tiniest details. On the other hand, some of us have terrible memories. At any moment you can have your memory seriously damaged by being in an severe accident that can damage your brain and memory. Amnesia is one of many conditions that could arise from such trauma to the brain. There are two types of amnesia, retrograde and anterograde (Psychology; From Inquiry to Understanding). Retro grade amnesia is where we lose memories from our past. Anterograde is where we lose the ability to form new memories. As stated in our textbook, one myth of amnesia is that most people with amnesia suffer from retrograde amnesia but, in reality, anterograde amnesia is much more common. Also, I believe it to be more difficult to deal with than retrograde amnesia. With that being said how does this type of amnesia affect the people with it and their family and friends? I thought of this question when I was watching an episode of Private Practice last week. A couple came in for an appointment. As it turned out, the wife is pregnant AND she has anterograde amnesia. She can't form any new memories. She is always surprised by the fact that she is pregnant. Long story short, her husband finds this condition emotionally draining on himself and decides to leave her after they have the baby. He figures that she won't remember anything anyways. This is just one example of the effects of amnesia on people. Is it morally right? Maybe not. But, regardless stories like this always leave me thinking...what would you do if someone you loved had anterograde amnesia? How would you deal with it?...
  • Posted Sleep Apnea to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    According to our textbook, Psychology: From Inquiry to Understanding, Sleep Apnea is a serious sleep disorder that affects roughly 2-20% of the general population. It is caused by a blockage of the airway during sleep resulting in fatigue, weight gain, night sweats, and irregular heart beat. Of course this is only some of the affects of sleep apnea and there are many more short and long term effects. What I am most interested in is what are the most popular and/or effective treatments for sleep apnea? Again, according to the textbook, most doctors recommend weight loss because this disorder is associated with being overweight. But, also mentioned in the book is the use of the CPAP machine. CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure. I was curious as to how it worked so I found a simple video on sleep apnea and how CPAP works: http://youtu.be/6QcmK24ZNyQ Still curious as to what treatment was better, I found an article from the American Sleep Association on CPAP and other sleep apnea treatments. They stated that the CPAP machine is the more popular treatment and potentially the most effective. Weight loss, as pointed out by the ASA, is still a very viable treatment, but it is a very slow process. So, most patients who are trying to lose weight are also put on CPAP to help open up their airways right away. So I guess, in a way, I've answered my question. CPAP is the more popular and effective treatment for sleep apnea if it's essentially being used not matter what. article from the American Sleep Association: http://www.sleepassociation.org/index.php?p=whatiscpap...
  • Posted Correlation Studies to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    We have talked some about correlational studies. Correlational studies are designs meant to examine the extent to which two variables are related. There are three types of correlation; negative, positive, and zero correlation. Negative is when one variable goes up the other goes down or in the opposite direction. Positive is when both variables go in the same direction. A zero correlation means that neither of the variables are related. I believe this is very important in psychology because psychologists do numerous studies and it is important to be able to find out whether two variables are correlated or not. In psychology we can't always be sure that two variables are correlated. Of course there are studies, like the one we did in class, where we graphed the correlation of quiz scores to exam scores. If you think about it, those two variables make sense. In most cases the higher the quiz scores the higher the exam score. But, sometimes there are outrageous correlations that don't make any sense. For example, eye color and math exam score. There would most likely be a zero correlation and those two things are pretty ridiculous to correlate in the first place. Sometimes there are studies that you just can't tell and that is when the research and experiments can help to support your claim. Here is an article about an interesting correlation study I found: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/21/divorce-causes-hair-loss-_n_974544.html...
  • Posted Correlational Studies to Psych 1001 Section 010 and 011 Fall 2011
    We have talked some about correlational studies. Correlational studies are designs meant to examine the extent to which two variables are related. There are three types of correlation; negative, positive, and zero correlation. Negative is when one variable goes up the other goes down or in the opposite direction. Positive is when both variables go in the same direction. A zero correlation means that neither of the variables are related. I believe this is very important in psychology because psychologists do numerous studies and it is important to be able to find out whether two variables are correlated or not. In psychology we can't always be sure that two variables are correlated. Of course there are studies, like the one we did in class, where we graphed the correlation of quiz scores to exam scores. If you think about it, those two variables make sense. In most cases the higher the quiz scores the higher the exam score. But, sometimes there are outrageous correlations that don't make any sense. For example, eye color and math exam score. There would most likely be a zero correlation and those two things are pretty ridiculous to correlate in the first place. Sometimes there are studies that you just can't tell and that is when the research and experiments can help to support your claim. Here is an article about an interesting correlation study I found: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/21/divorce-causes-hair-loss-_n_974544.html...
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