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Minnesota


Can Dayton Catch Lightning in a Bottle Twice?

Minnesotans have elected a Democratic governor with a Democrat in the White House in just four of 28 cycles since statehood - with none in their second term.

Buyer's Remorse? Franken Loss Would Make History in Minnesota

Minnesotans have never flipped a U.S. Senate seat in back-to-back-to-back elections.

Marty Seifert's Political Hiatus: Not a Problem

A new study suggests Seifert's three years out of government should not decrease his chances of winning the Republican gubernatorial nomination.

Plurality Blues: Governors on the Hot Seat

Since 1900, less than half of plurality-winning governors who were eligible for another term were reelected to their seat in the next cycle.

Tim Pawlenty: The Forgotten Man?

During Jeopardy's Teacher's Tournament, three educators could not name the capital city from where Tim Pawlenty governed for eight years.

Veterans Represented in Minnesota US House Delegation for 102 Straight Years

Minnesota has elected at least one candidate with military service to the U.S. House since 1910.

12 Reasons Minneapolis' Mayoral Election Is More Interesting Than Yours

35 candidates. Two Bobs, two Marks, two Christophers, two Johns, two Jameses. Captain Jack Sparrow and The Rock. Ranked choice voting. Welcome to elections in the City of Lakes.

Back to Back to Back? Will Another Minnesota US Rep Fall in 2014?

It's been 50 years since the last time incumbents from the Gopher State U.S. House delegation were defeated in three consecutive cycles.

Collin Peterson's Fundraising Numbers Not a Retirement 'Tell'

Although Democratic alarm bells are ringing, Peterson's off-year fundraising tally is actually up in 2013 compared to his average hauls over the last decade.

On the Hot Seat: US Senate Plurality-Vote Winners

Nearly 40 percent of plurality vote winners of U.S. Senate contests have lost their seat in the next election; three are on the ballot in 2014 (Begich, Franken, Merkley).

100 Years of Minnesota Republican Gubernatorial Primaries

Gopher State Republicans have not had a competitive gubernatorial primary since 1924.

Minnesota Republican US Senate Primaries by the Numbers

The GOP is coming off its most competitive Senate primary since 1934; Julianne Ortman will become the 10th female GOP U.S. Senate primary candidate if she wins (or ignores) her party's endorsement.

Harry Byrd's Death Leaves 167 Living Ex-Senators

Minnesota has the most living former Senators with eight while six states have only one (Hawaii, Mississippi, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, Wyoming).

Bachmann Raised More Than $1K Per Day After Retirement Announcement

Bachmann raised more than $1,000 per day in large donor contributions after May 29th - aided by a misleading fundraising message on her campaign website.

The 10 Oldest Freshmen US Representatives in Minnesota History

If Don Shelby ran for the 3rd CD seat and won in 2014 he would be the 4th oldest first-term Minnesota U.S. Representative among the more than 130 to serve the state.

Minnesota's Aging US House Delegation

Minnesota's eight U.S. Representatives are the second oldest delegation in state history and odds are strong they'll set the record in 2014.

John Kline: Six Going on Seven?

Nearly 90 percent of six-term Minnesota U.S. Representatives have been successful in their bids for a 7th term since statehood.

Democracy in Action: Major Party Competition in US House Elections

Indiana has placed Democratic and Republican candidates on the ballot in a nation-best 180 consecutive U.S. House races, with New Hampshire, Minnesota, Idaho, and Montana all tallying 100 or more.

Bachmann's Little Secret: Not Fixated on God, Guns, and Gays

Only one percent of the congresswoman's nearly 600 press releases since 2007 have focused on the "3 Gs" collectively, as well as just one percent on abortion.

How Many Republicans Will Run for Minnesota's 6th CD in 2014?

Less than 5 percent of the 208 Minnesota Republican U.S. House primaries over the last 50 years have fielded three or more candidates on the ballot (and only 7 percent of races without a GOP incumbent).



Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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