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National Politics


64 Percent of 9/11 Legislators Are Out of Congress

Only 36 percent of the 531 U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives in office on September 11, 2001 are still in Congress.

African-American US Representatives by the Numbers

Maryland has elected blacks to the U.S. House at the highest rate in the nation since 1870; 25 states have yet to elect any African-Americans to the chamber.

Meet the 9 US Representatives without Campaign Websites

Election Day is only 442 days away, but these members of the House of Representatives still don't have their reelection websites up and running...

House GOP Leader Highlights Obama Connection

Although a frequent critic of the president and Obamacare, Chief Deputy Whip Peter Roskam proudly underscores his old relationship with Obama on his House website.

36 US Representatives with Spanish-Language Web Pages

31 Democrats and five Republicans provide some Spanish-language content on their official U.S. House websites.

Will Democrats Run a Candidate in Every 2014 US Senate Race?

Democrats have failed to field a U.S. Senate candidate in as many races since 2000 as they did from 1930 through 1999 (eight).

George H.W. Bush: Hater of Broccoli

Obama may love the food, but the 41st President used his distaste for the green vegetable as a punchline dozens of times during his four years in office.

Yankee Doodle Dandies: 40 Members of Congress Born on July 4th

Over the past 284 years, 40 eventual U.S. Senators and Representatives from 22 states were born on the 4th of July.

To Serve or Represent? Website Taglines of US Representatives

How do 435 men and women use linguistic snippets on their House websites to distinguish themselves and what they do?

Scoreboard: Navy 21, Army 14 (Presidential Commencement Addresses)

Although it is 43 years its junior, the Naval Academy has hosted 50 percent more commencement addresses by sitting U.S. Presidents than West Point.

Tired of 'Scandals?' Try These Words On for Size

Some broadcast reporters and commentators have departed from the standard nomenclature and opened a thesaurus to give viewers a break from the Obama 'scandals.'

Are Eric Holder's Days Numbered?

The 82nd Attorney General already has the ninth longest tenure of any AG in U.S. history.

Off the Radar? Chechnya Never Mentioned in Public by Obama

Bill Clinton and George W. Bush discussed the troubled region nearly 100 times over a 10-year period that saw two Chechen wars and high-profile terrorist acts that killed several hundred Russians.

Obama Has Mentioned Terrorism Nearly 1,500 Times as President

Although accused by some of being too gun-shy in using the term, the president has mentioned terrorism (and terror-derived words) an average of one time per day while in office.

When Will Obama Stop Using the Term "Illegal Immigrant?"

The Associated Press has now officially dropped the term, but the President has mentioned "illegal immigrants" 28 times since taking office, including as recently as two months ago.

Who's #1 (Part II)? The Media's 2016 Democratic Field

Hillary and Joe are ranked 1-2 in eight of 11 outlets under analysis with Andrew Cuomo solidly in third.

Who's #1? The Media's 2016 Republican Field

Twenty-three GOPers have been listed as 2016 contenders across a dozen media outlets; only two candidates appear on all 12 lists (Rubio and Christie).

And the Most Notable First Lady Is...Laura Bush?

Laura Bush receives a 29 percent longer write-up than any other First Lady on the White House website's official bio pages.

Clockwatchers: Capitol Hill Republicans Showcase 'Debt Clocks' on Websites

Twenty percent of Republicans on the Hill incorporate "debt clocks" on their official congressional websites, compared to just one Democrat; GOPers also feature clocks related to the Keystone Pipeline, gas prices, and Raúl Castro.

Will Obama Become the Next William Howard Taft?

Did the president hint at his potential career ambition of becoming a Supreme Court justice during a recent news conference?



Political Crumbs

Small Club in St. Paul

Mark Dayton is one of just three Minnesotans ever elected to three different statewide offices. Dayton, of course, had previously served as State Auditor (1991-1995) and U.S. Senator (2001-2007) before winning the governorship in 2010. At that time, he joined Republicans Edward Thye and J.A.A. Burnquist on this very short list. Burnquist was elected lieutenant governor in 1914 but then became governor after the death of Democrat Winfield Hammond in 1915. He then won the gubernatorial elections of 1916 and 1918 and eight terms as attorney general two decades later (1939-1955). Thye was similarly first elected lieutenant governor of the Gopher State and became governor after the resignation of fellow GOPer Harold Stassen in 1943. Thye won one additional full term as governor in 1944 and then two terms to the U.S. Senate (1947-1959). Twenty Minnesotans have been elected to two different statewide offices.


Respect Your Elders?

With retirement announcements this year by veteran U.S. Representatives such as 30-term Democrat John Dingell of Michigan, 20-term Democrat George Miller of California, and 18-term Republican Tom Petri of Wisconsin, it is no surprise that retirees from the 113th Congress are one of the most experienced cohorts in recent decades. Overall, these 24 exiting members of the House have served an average of 11.0 terms - the second longest tenure among retirees across the last 18 cycles since 1980. Only the U.S. Representatives retiring in 2006 had more experience, averaging 11.9 terms. (In that cycle, 10 of the 11 retiring members served at least 10 terms, with GOPer Bill Jenkins of Tennessee the lone exception at just five). Even without the aforementioned Dingell, the average length of service in the chamber of the remaining 23 retirees in 2014 is 10.2 terms - which would still be the third highest since 1980 behind the 2006 and 2012 (10.5 terms) cycles.


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