Go to HHH home page.
Smart Politics
 


U.S. House


The Shortest Tenures of Louisiana US Reps in History

Vance McAllister's political half-life may be running out, but he won't quite have the briefest stint in the U.S. House from the Pelican State - that would be Effingham Lawrence at just one day.

Vance McAllister: In His Own Words

If Rep. McAllister does not resign, his 2014 opponents will have a treasure trove of statements from the congressman saying one thing and doing another.

Tom Petri to Face Rare Republican Challenger in 2014

The fourth longest-serving U.S. Representative in Wisconsin history has faced only two primary challengers during his 17 previous reelection bids.

Will Montana Split Its Congressional Ballot Again in 2014?

Only two of 27 states have split their vote for U.S. Senate and at-large U.S. House seats in a majority of elections over the last century: Montana (78 percent of the time) and South Dakota (60 percent).

The Quotable Jim Sensenbrenner

One of Capitol Hill's most outspoken critics of the mass data collection undertaken by the last two presidential administrations shares his thoughts on fear-mongering, Edward Snowden, and the long winter of 2014.

West Virginia, Utah Eye All-GOP US House Delegations in 2014

It has been more than 90 years since the last time Republicans had a monopoly on every U.S. House seat in the Mountain State.

The Rise of GOP Primary Challengers in Minnesota US House Races

The rate of Republican incumbents facing primary challengers has tripled during the last decade compared to the previous 40 in the Gopher State.

The Unlikely Candidacy of Idaho's Richard Stallings

Stallings seeks to become the oldest candidate ever elected to the U.S. House from Idaho as he eyes the second congressional rematch of his political career.

Edwin Edwards' Long, Winding Political Road

One out of 12 Louisiana U.S. Representatives have exited and then returned to the chamber, including a 32-year hiatus by one Pelican State congressman.

Collin Peterson By the Numbers

Peterson will crack the Top 10 list for the oldest U.S. Representatives in Minnesota history by the end of this term; only five others have served longer in the chamber.

Gender Equality in the US House: A State-by State Quarter-Century Report Card (1989-2014)

A study of 5,325 congressional elections finds the number of female U.S. Representatives has more than tripled over the last 25 years, but the rate at which women are elected to the chamber still varies greatly between the states.

Will Overby's Candidacy Ignite Florida Libertarians in 2014?

Overby is just the fifth candidate to appear on the ballot as a Libertarian in a Florida U.S. House race.

Advantage Sink? Women Win US House Specials at More Than 2x Rate of General Elections

Since 1980, women have won nearly a quarter of the nation's 141 U.S. House special elections (and 58 percent of contests featuring only one female major party nominee), compared to just 11 percent of general election races.

Ralph Hall Could Become Just 2nd Ever Texas GOP US Rep to Lose Nomination Bid

If he loses a May runoff, Hall would become only the second of 258 incumbent Republican U.S. House members from the Lone Star State to fail to secure their party's nomination since statehood.

Debbie Dingell Eyes Historic Win in 2014

Dingell could become the first non-widowed woman to immediately take over a spouse's seat in Congress.

John Dingell By the Numbers

The Michigan Congressman has served with 2,448 U.S. Representatives to date including 24 named 'Smith' and 86 percent of all women elected to the chamber in U.S. history.

12 Retiring, Ex-, or Deceased Congressmen with Active Campaign Websites

One announced his retirement last September. Another died in October. One resigned last week. A dozen members of Congress that aren't running for reelection still have active campaign websites - that accept financial donations.

One and Done: The Unusual Exit of Gloria Negrete McLeod

Negrete McLeod is one of just two U.S. Representatives out of the more than 210 California freshmen elected to the chamber since World War II not to run for a second term or seek a U.S. Senate seat.

Do Democratic Hopes of Beating Kline End with a Dayton Loss?

A political party losing control of the governor's mansion has picked up a U.S. House seat in just three cycles in Minnesota history.

The Vanishing Center: Exiting US Representatives

More than half of the U.S. Representatives retiring in 2014 are within 10 points of the ideological center of the chamber according to National Journal's new vote ratings, compared to just one of 14 members running for higher office.



Political Crumbs

No 100-Year Curse for Roberts

Defeating his Tea Party primary challenger Milton Wolf with just 48.1 percent of the vote, Pat Roberts narrowly escaped becoming the first elected U.S. Senator from Kansas to lose a renomination bid in 100 years. The last - and so far only - elected U.S. Senator to lose a Kansas primary was one-term Republican Joseph Bristow in 1914. Bristow was defeated by former U.S. Senator Charles Curtis who went on to win three terms before becoming Herbert Hoover's running mate in 1928. Only one other U.S. Senator from the Sunflower State has lost a primary since the passage of the 17th Amendment: Sheila Frahm in 1996. Frahm was appointed to fill Bob Dole's seat earlier that year and finished 13.2 points behind Sam Brownback in the three-candidate primary field. Overall, incumbent senators from Kansas have won 29 times against two defeats in the direct vote era. (Curtis also lost a primary in 1912 to Walter Stubbs, one year before the nation moved to direct elections).


The Second Time Around

Former Republican Congressman Bob Beauprez became the seventh major party or second place gubernatorial candidate in Colorado to get a second chance at the office when he narrowly won his party's nomination last month. Two of the previous six candidates were successful. Democrat Alva Adams lost his first gubernatorial bid to Benjamin Eaton in 1884, but was victorious two years later against William Meyer. Democrat Charles Johnson placed third in 1894 behind Republican Albert McIntyre and Populist incumbent Governor David Waite but returned as the Fusion (Democrat/Populist) nominee in 1898 and defeated GOPer Henry Wolcott. Gubernatorial candidates who received a second chance but lost both general elections include Democrat Thomas Patterson (1888, 1914), Progressive Edward Costigan (1912, 1914), Republican Donald Brotzman (1954, 1956), and Republican David Strickland (1978, 1986).


more POLITICAL CRUMBS

Humphrey School Sites
CSPG
Humphrey New Media Hub

Issues />

<div id=
Abortion
Afghanistan
Budget and taxes
Campaign finances
Crime and punishment
Economy and jobs
Education
Energy
Environment
Foreign affairs
Gender
Health
Housing
Ideology
Immigration
Iraq
Media
Military
Partisanship
Race and ethnicity
Reapportionment
Redistricting
Religion
Sexuality
Sports
Terrorism
Third parties
Transportation
Voting