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U.S. House


Déjà Vu: Wisconsin's 2014 US House Elections

Wisconsin has elected the same U.S. House delegation in back-to-back cycles just 12 times since statehood in 1848 but is likely to do so next November.

1 in 5 Democratic US Reps Entered House via Special Election

Nearly 20 percent of the Democratic caucus in office today was first elected via special election compared to just 1 in 10 Republicans.

Wisconsin Veterans in Midst of Record US House Delegation Drought

It has been more than 10 years since a veteran was elected to serve in the U.S. House from the Badger State - the longest period in state history

Veterans Represented in Minnesota US House Delegation for 102 Straight Years

Minnesota has elected at least one candidate with military service to the U.S. House since 1910.

Runyan 1st New Jersey Sophomore US Rep to Call it Quits in 65 Years

The New Jersey Republican is the first two-term U.S. Representative from the Garden State not to seek a third term since 1948, and only the 6th out of more than 100 to serve since 1900.

Back to Back to Back? Will Another Minnesota US Rep Fall in 2014?

It's been 50 years since the last time incumbents from the Gopher State U.S. House delegation were defeated in three consecutive cycles.

It's All Relative: Florida US Representatives Edition

11 percent of Florida's U.S. Representatives in history had family members who previously served in Congress.

Two and Done: Tim Griffin's Abrupt Exit from the US House

89 percent of the 80 two-term Arkansas U.S. Representatives since statehood ran for a third term or higher office that cycle.

Gene Taylor Contemplating Rare Comeback in Mississippi

It has been nearly 130 years since the last Mississippi U.S. Representative returned to the chamber after losing a seat at the ballot box.

Claude Pepper, Dwight Rogers Only Florida US Reps to Die in Office

Reports of Bill Young's death on Thursday were premature; 72 of the state's 132 U.S. House members in history are still alive.

Tom Foley and GOP Eye Rare Split-Ticket Upset in Connecticut

For the first time in the Democratic vs Republican era, one party could sweep Connecticut's congressional seats while the other wins the governorship.

Collin Peterson's Fundraising Numbers Not a Retirement 'Tell'

Although Democratic alarm bells are ringing, Peterson's off-year fundraising tally is actually up in 2013 compared to his average hauls over the last decade.

Going Green: Alabama's Soon to Be Inexperienced US House Delegation

The Yellowhammer State is on a path to notch one of its least experienced U.S. House delegations over the last 100 years.

Shea-Porter vs Guinta III: 1 in 5 New Hampshire US House Races Are Rematches

Thirty-six New Hampshire U.S. House elections have been rematches since birth of the GOP in the 1850s, including five pairs of candidates who have battled it out three times.

Running from the Flag? Old Glory Symbolism Waning on US House Campaign Websites

Republicans incorporate the American flag on their 2014 campaign websites at a 45 percent higher rate than Democrats, but the presence of Old Glory is down 39 percent overall from the 2010 cycle.

64 Percent of 9/11 Legislators Are Out of Congress

Only 36 percent of the 531 U.S. Senators and U.S. Representatives in office on September 11, 2001 are still in Congress.

Unusual Exits: 13 Members of Congress Who Drowned

Two congressmen drowned while in office; one former U.S. Representative drowned on the Titanic and another on Independence Day.

African-American US Representatives by the Numbers

Maryland has elected blacks to the U.S. House at the highest rate in the nation since 1870; 25 states have yet to elect any African-Americans to the chamber.

Unusual Exits: 6 Members of Congress Killed by Accidental Gunshots

Hunting moose...hunting ducks...cleaning a shotgun...a half-dozen members of Congress learned too late about the importance of firearms safety.

Meet the 9 US Representatives without Campaign Websites

Election Day is only 442 days away, but these members of the House of Representatives still don't have their reelection websites up and running...



Political Crumbs

Haugh to Reach New Heights

The North Carolina U.S. Senate race between Democratic incumbent Kay Hagan and Republican Thom Tillis may go down to the wire next Tuesday, but along the way Libertarian nominee Sean Haugh is poised to set a state record for a non-major party candidate. Haugh, who previously won 1.5 percent of the vote in the Tar Heel State's 2002 race, has polled at or above five percent in 10 of the last 12 polls that included his name. The current high water mark for a third party or independent candidate in a North Carolina U.S. Senate election is just 3.3 percent, recorded by Libertarian Robert Emory back in 1992. Only one other candidate has eclipsed the three percent mark - Libertarian Christopher Cole with 3.1 percent in 2008.


Gubernatorial Highs and Lows

Two sitting governors currently hold the record for the highest gubernatorial vote ever received in their respective states by a non-incumbent: Republican Matt Mead of Wyoming (65.7 percent in 2010) and outgoing GOPer Dave Heineman of Nebraska (73.4 percent in 2006). Republican Gary Herbert of Utah had not previously won a gubernatorial contest when he notched a state record 64.1 percent for his first victory in 2010, but was an incumbent at the time after ascending to the position in 2009 after the early departure of Jon Huntsman. Meanwhile, two sitting governors hold the record in their states for the lowest mark ever recorded by a winning gubernatorial candidate (incumbent or otherwise): independent-turned-Democrat Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island (36.1 percent in 2010) and Democrat Terry McAuliffe of Virginia (47.8 percent in 2013).


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