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U.S. House


Bachmann's Little Secret: Not Fixated on God, Guns, and Gays

Only one percent of the congresswoman's nearly 600 press releases since 2007 have focused on the "3 Gs" collectively, as well as just one percent on abortion.

Paying His Dues: Markey Shatters Senate Record for Prior House Service

The newest member of the U.S. Senate breaks a record that had been held for 88 years - by a predecessor of his own Senate seat.

The Historically Undersized Pennsylvania Democratic US House Delegation

The 2012 cycle yielded the lowest number and percentage of major party Pennsylvania U.S. House members from the state's winning presidential candidate since the birth of the two-party system in 1828.

How Many Republicans Will Run for Minnesota's 6th CD in 2014?

Less than 5 percent of the 208 Minnesota Republican U.S. House primaries over the last 50 years have fielded three or more candidates on the ballot (and only 7 percent of races without a GOP incumbent).

To Serve or Represent? Website Taglines of US Representatives

How do 435 men and women use linguistic snippets on their House websites to distinguish themselves and what they do?

Michaud Gearing Up to Battle Cutler, History in Maine Gubernatorial Bid

Only 1 in 3 ex- or sitting Maine U.S. Representatives to land on the gubernatorial general election ballot have been victorious.

Meet the Three House Women Who Go by "Congressman"

Republicans Marsha Blackburn, Diane Black, and Cynthia Lummis are the lone holdouts from self-identifying as a "Congresswoman."

How Much Money Will Bachmann Raise as a Non-Candidate?

Bachmann is still fundraising on her campaign website with a pitch that Democrats are "trying to defeat her" - even though she is retiring and won't be on the ballot in 2014.

2,445 US Representatives Who Served with John Dingell

From Watkins Abbitt to John Zwach, Dingell has worked alongside nearly 2,500 different elected men and women over the last 21,000 days in the nation's lower legislative chamber.

A Brief History of "Representative Smith"

A look back at the 115 "Smiths" to serve in the House as newly-minted U.S. Representative Jason Smith of Missouri adds his name to the roster.

Missouri Democratic US House Pick-Up Drought Extends to 47

Democrats have lost each of the last 47 Missouri U.S. House contests in Republican controlled districts dating back to 1994 - its second worst streak in the nation.

Blast from the Past: Margolies Eyes Deep Pennsylvania History in 2014 Bid

115 Pennsylvania U.S. Representatives served interrupted stints in the chamber, including seven with gaps of 20+ years.

Unusual Exits: Congressional Deaths By or On Trains

Nearly two-dozen ex- or sitting members of Congress have been killed by or on trains in U.S. history.

Michele Bachmann's US House Exit in Historical Context

Only 1 in 3 of Minnesota's 134 U.S. Representatives exited the chamber by a manner other than defeat or death, and more than half of these ran for or held prominent political office thereafter.

Edward Baker: The Lone Sitting Member of Congress Killed in War

The longtime friend of Abraham Lincoln died at the Battle of Balls Bluff with the rank of major general in 1861 while also serving in the U.S. Senate from Oregon.

Love vs Matheson's 2014 Rematch: Advantage Matheson?

Nearly 1 in 10 U.S. House races in Utah history involved rematches but only three such challengers were successful - all by Republicans during GOP wave cycles.

Weiner Has Political Pedigree for NYC Mayoral Run (But So Did Hearst)

The former congressman once again seeks to become the 12th ex- or sitting member of the U.S. House or U.S. Senate to subsequently serve as mayor of New York City.

Herseth Sandlin and the US House to Senate Pathway

Just 10 of the 44 female U.S. Senators in history first served in the House of Representatives and three of the last 13 since 2002.

Democrats Hit the Wall Again in South Carolina Special Election

The Democratic Party's longest U.S. House pick-up drought in the nation extended to 48 consecutive losses in South Carolina Tuesday, where the party has failed to gain a seat for a quarter-century.

We Are Family? Colbert Busch vs Sanford Campaign Website Biographies

Elizabeth Colbert Busch discusses her family in 34 percent of her campaign website bio compared to just 8 percent for Mark Sanford; Sanford devotes 81 percent to career accomplishments.



Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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