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U.S. House


The Literary Namesakes of US Congressmen

One of your ancestors might have been represented by James Joyce, John Milton, Thomas Eliot, or John Dryden on Capitol Hill.

Paulsen's Pathway? Minnesota Senators Who First Served in the House

Will he or won't he? Until we know for sure, here is a profile of the nine U.S. Senators from the Gopher State who previously served in the nation's lower legislative chamber.

House Democrats Issue Statements on Connecticut Massacre at 4x Rate of GOPers

While 27 percent of House Democrats issued official press releases on the Newtown, Connecticut murders, only 6 percent of Republicans did so and no GOPer mentioned the word 'gun' in their statements.

More than Half of Senators in 113th Congress First Served in House

Six new faces entering the Senate in January served in the House and 51 overall; Hawaii, Virginia, and Massachusetts have the highest all-time rate of choosing Senators with House experience.

Senator Tim Scott? Sitting Congressmen Rarely Appointed from South Carolina

Only one sitting U.S. House member has been appointed out of 15 appointments to the U.S. Senate from South Carolina; only four of these appointed senators were subsequently elected to the chamber

Forerunners of the Fiscal Cliff

Chuck Grassley, Jeff Flake, Jim DeMint, and Kent Conrad have warned about budgetary fiscal cliffs for years.

Ohio: Gerrymandering 1, Obama Coattails 0

With only four Democratic U.S. Representatives elected from Ohio in 2012, the Buckeye State is sending the smallest number and percentage of allies of a newly-elected president to D.C. in state history.

House Democrats Inch Closer to Becoming a Two-State Caucus

Californians and New Yorkers will comprise a record percentage of the Democratic caucus when the 113th Congress convenes in January at nearly 30 percent.

Democrats Amass 144 Consecutive US House Victories in Four Northeastern States

Democratic nominees have won 144 U.S. House contests in a row in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Maine, and Rhode Island.

Paul Ryan Survives Closest Win of Congressional Career

Ryan's 11-point victory Tuesday was down nearly 20 points from his previous seven wins in Wisconsin's 1st Congressional District.

New Hampshire to Become 1st State with an All-Female DC Delegation

Democratic pick-ups by Carol Shea-Porter and Ann Kuster in the Granite State's two U.S. House districts gives New Hampshire the nation's first ever all-female D.C. delegation.

Projections: 2012 Upper Midwestern U.S. House Races

More than a half-dozen contests in the five-state region could be decided by single digits.

Minnesota Eyes Most Competitive US House Races Since 1994

The last time three Gopher State congressional races were decided by single digits was during the Republican Revolution.

Will Christie Vilsack Make History for Iowa Women?

Iowa would become the 45th state in the nation to elect a woman to the U.S. House if Vilsack defeats Steve King in November.

Will Iowa Republicans Lose Every US House Seat for the First Time in History?

Republicans have won at least one U.S. House seat from the Hawkeye State since 1856.

Is the Revolution Over? 3rd Party US House Candidacies Fall 22% from 2010

There are 97 fewer third party and independent candidates on the general election ballots for the nation's 435 congressional district races this cycle compared to two years ago.

Two-Candidate Race a Rarity in Minnesota's 5th Congressional District

The Minneapolis area congressional district had fielded 16 third party and independent U.S. House candidates over the last eight cycles, averaging 9 percent of the vote.

Third Parties Vanish from Minnesota's 2012 US House Races

There are 11 fewer independent and third party candidates running for Minnesota's eight congressional seats in 2012 compared to two years ago.

Ryan Seeks to Become 1st GOPer to Simultaneously Win VP and Congressional Seat

Only three previous individuals - all Democrats - have won the vice-presidency and were reelected to their seat on Capitol Hill on Election Day.

Minnesota DFL 8th CD Primary Sets Statewide Record in Post-Merger Era

The last time the margin between first and third place was less than nine points in a Minnesota U.S. House primary race was 1942



Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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