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U.S. Senate


Herb Kohl FEC Filings Do Not Tip Hand as to 2012 Election Plans

Kohl's end of the year cash on hand amounts have been pretty low throughout the decade

Ensign Departure Still Leaves Big Opportunity for Democrats in 2012 Nevada Senate Race

Partisan control has flipped in every open general election Nevada U.S. Senate race since first popular vote contest in 1908

Strange Bedfellows: The Curious Case of Chuck Grassley and Tom Harkin

Iowa U.S. Senatorial duo have now served side-by-side for the third longest period in U.S. Senate history for state delegation members of different political parties

Which States Have the Longest-Serving US Senate Delegations?

Hawaii and Iowa lead the pack with battleground states littering the Bottom 10; Daniel Inouye's 48+ years of service is equal to 33 other Senators combined

Rehberg Would Make GOP History by Defeating Tester in MT US Senate Race

Sitting at-large representatives have unseated U.S Senators just 17 percent of the time over the last 100 years - a feat never accomplished by a Republican

No GOP Challenger Yet For Amy Klobuchar? No Problem

No eventual major party nominee over the last four Minnesota U.S. Senate elections had announced their candidacy at this point in the election cycle

George Allen Attempts Historical Rarity in 2012 U.S. Senate Bid

Only 11 U.S. Senators have been elected to two interrupted full terms over the last 100 years, and just 5 did so after losing a reelection bid in between

Which States Produce the Most U.S. Senators?

Over the last 100 years Ohio, New York, and Missouri have given birth to the most Senators, while Ohio, Vermont and Mississippi boast the largest percentage of home-born Senators

Is Democratic Hold on Wisconsin's 2012 U.S. Senate Seat Tied to an Obama Victory?

Badger State has voted for same party of U.S. Senate and Presidential nominees in 14 of 16 election cycles over the last century

More Likely 2012 US Senate Scenario: Connecticut to the GOP or North Dakota to the Dems?

Connecticut has never voted for a Republican U.S. Senator and a Democratic presidential nominee in the same cycle

Could Republicans Sweep the Midwest in US Senate Races Again in 2012?

GOP won nine Senate seats in the region last November for the first time since 1920

What's in a Name? From Abraham to Zell, 100 Years of U.S. Senators

John, William, and James are the most common of the 313 different first names used by the more than 875 Senators elected or appointed during the last 100 years; trending: Mark and Mike

Which U.S. Senate Seats Have Had the Most Partisan Turnover?

Six seats up for election in 2012 rank in the top 10 for the most frequent change in party control since the introduction of popular vote elections, including Sherrod Brown's (OH), Claire McCaskill's (MO), and Joe Lieberman's (CT)

Could Russ Feingold Win Herb Kohl's U.S. Senate Seat in 2012?

Nineteen U.S. Senators have served both U.S. Senate seats from their state over the past 100 years including ten who (like Feingold) were previously voted out of office

History Gives Klobuchar a 2 in 3 Chance to Win Reelection in 2012

10 of 15 freshmen Minnesota U.S. Senators have won reelection to a second term since popular vote contests began 100 years ago

Murkowski Wins More Votes Than All Statewide Write-in Candidates in Alaska History Combined

Only 94,926 Alaskans had cast their ballot for statewide write-in candidates over the previous 52 years; Murkowski eclipses 100,000

Smart Politics Projections: U.S. Senate

Balance of power in the U.S. Senate will undoubtedly be one of the most important story lines to watch Tuesday evening

Female Candidates to Shatter Records Across the Country on Election Day

More than a dozen women will set state records on Tuesday for female gubernatorial and U.S. Senate candidacies

Harry Reid Could Become Just Fifth Senate Party Floor Leader to Lose at the Ballot Box

Death more common than defeat in ending the reign of Senate's majority and minority leaders; over 86 percent have won reelection since 1920

Republicans Positioned to Win Nine Midwestern U.S. Senate Seats for First Time Since 1920

GOP on track to sweep all nine Class III Midwest Senate seats in the 12-state region for the first time in 90 years



Political Crumbs

Seeing Red

Congressman Nick Rahall's failed bid for a 20th term in West Virginia this cycle, combined with a narrow loss by Nick Casey to Alex Mooney in Shelley Moore Capito's open seat, means that West Virginia Democrats will be shut out of the state's U.S. House delegation for the first time in over 90 years. The Republican sweep by two-term incumbent David McKinley in the 1st CD, Mooney in the 2nd, and Evan Jenkins over Rahall in the 3rd marks the first time the GOP has held all seats in the chamber from West Virginia since the Election of 1920. During the 67th Congress (1921-1923) all six seats from the state were controlled by the GOP. Since the Election of 1922, Democrats have won 76 percent of all U.S. House elections in the Mountain State - capturing 172 seats compared to 54 for the GOP.


Home Field Advantage?

When the 114th Congress convenes in a few days, Maine will be represented by one home-grown U.S. Representative: Waterville-born Republican Bruce Poliquin. With the departure of Millinocket-born Mike Michaud, who launched a failed gubernatorial bid, the Pine Tree State was poised to send a House delegation to D.C. without any Maine-born members for the first time since 1821. Three-term U.S. Rep. Chellie Pingree (born in Minnesota) coasted to reelection as expected, however Poliquin edged Kentucky-born Emily Cain by 5.3 points to keep the streak alive. Since 1876, a total of 208 of the 222 candidates elected to the nation's lower legislative chamber from the state have been born in Maine, or 94 percent.


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