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U.S. Senate


Yankee Doodle Dandies: 40 Members of Congress Born on July 4th

Over the past 284 years, 40 eventual U.S. Senators and Representatives from 22 states were born on the 4th of July.

Do the Numbers Add Up for Mitch McConnell?

McConnell is 1 of just 6 U.S. Senators in history to win three of their first five consecutive terms by single digits. Three subsequently retired. A fourth - Bob Packwood - resigned. The fifth? Harry Reid.

McConnell Bucking History: Kentucky Has Nation's Highest Senator Turnover Rate

The Minority Leader has the longest Senate tenure in Kentucky history, even though the state's two Senate seats have turned over 77 times, or an average of once per 2.8 years - the highest rate in the country.

Paying His Dues: Markey Shatters Senate Record for Prior House Service

The newest member of the U.S. Senate breaks a record that had been held for 88 years - by a predecessor of his own Senate seat.

How Long Will Ed Markey Serve?

Markey is the 11th oldest candidate to win a U.S. Senate special election out of more than 170 men and women since the passage of the 17th Amendment.

US Senate Special Elections by the Numbers

Which two states have held seven special elections since 1913? Which two states have yet to hold one? And what Senator was elected via special election three times?

Jim Abeler: Leading Off the Senate Roll Call Vote in 2015?

Only three U.S. Senators in history had a name earlier in the alphabet than the budding 2014 Republican Senate candidate; no Minnesotan has ever topped the chamber's roll call list.

Chiesa to Tally 4th Shortest Senate Tenure in New Jersey History

Chris Christie's appointee will serve just 129 days in the Senate - the fourth shortest stint among the 65 U.S. Senators to serve from New Jersey since statehood.

How Long Will New Jersey's US Senate Seat Remain Vacant?

New Jersey has endured 27 vacancies throughout history totaling more than three years; four vacancies have lasted more than 100 days.

Unusual Exits: Congressional Deaths By or On Trains

Nearly two-dozen ex- or sitting members of Congress have been killed by or on trains in U.S. history.

Edward Baker: The Lone Sitting Member of Congress Killed in War

The longtime friend of Abraham Lincoln died at the Battle of Balls Bluff with the rank of major general in 1861 while also serving in the U.S. Senate from Oregon.

Will Pat O'Brien Enter South Dakota's US Senate Race?

Ten years after flirting with a gubernatorial run, the sports and entertainment newsman drops a hint of his future plans on the Adam Carolla Show podcast.

Weiner Has Political Pedigree for NYC Mayoral Run (But So Did Hearst)

The former congressman once again seeks to become the 12th ex- or sitting member of the U.S. House or U.S. Senate to subsequently serve as mayor of New York City.

Sestak Seeks First US Senate Rematch in Pennsylvania History

If Sestak wins the 2016 Democratic nomination he will be the first major party candidate to secure a rematch in a Pennsylvania U.S. Senate race in the popular vote era.

Herseth Sandlin and the US House to Senate Pathway

Just 10 of the 44 female U.S. Senators in history first served in the House of Representatives and three of the last 13 since 2002.

From Helena to D.C.? Schweitzer Would Make History in Montana

No ex- or sitting Montana governor has ever gone on to win a U.S. Senate (or U.S. House) race.

The Longest-Held Republican US Senate Seats

Kansas, Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming claim seven of the Top 10 spots on the list.

Appointment for Defeat? Schatz Could Lose Hawaii Senate Seat

More than two-thirds of the 190 appointed U.S. Senators since 1913 have not been elected to their seat the next time it was on the ballot.

Baucus Retirement Opens Up 2nd Longest Democratic-Held Senate Seat

It has been 36,577 days (March 3, 1913) since the last time a Republican sat in Montana's Class II U.S. Senate seat, behind only Louisiana's Class II seat (47,534 days, March 3, 1883).

Joe Miller, You Will Be Challenged

Fifty-one Republican candidates have run in the 19 Alaska U.S. Senate primaries conducted since 1960.



Political Crumbs

The Second Time Around

Former Republican Congressman Bob Beauprez became the seventh major party or second place gubernatorial candidate in Colorado to get a second chance at the office when he narrowly won his party's nomination last month. Two of the previous six candidates were successful. Democrat Alva Adams lost his first gubernatorial bid to Benjamin Eaton in 1884, but was victorious two years later against William Meyer. Democrat Charles Johnson placed third in 1894 behind Republican Albert McIntyre and Populist incumbent Governor David Waite but returned as the Fusion (Democrat/Populist) nominee in 1898 and defeated GOPer Henry Wolcott. Gubernatorial candidates who received a second chance but lost both general elections include Democrat Thomas Patterson (1888, 1914), Progressive Edward Costigan (1912, 1914), Republican Donald Brotzman (1954, 1956), and Republican David Strickland (1978, 1986).


How Are the Plurality Winners Doing?

Nearly 40 percent of plurality winners of U.S. Senate elections lose their seat in the next election cycle. Will that happen to any of the three such incumbents on the ballot in 2014? Recent polling suggests Democrats Al Franken of Minnesota, Mark Begich of Alaska, and Jeff Merkley of Oregon all currently have an advantage over their nominated/frontrunning GOP opponents, but each is flirting with plurality support once again. Franken led endorsed GOPer Mike McFadden 48 to 42 percent in a new SurveyUSA poll while the polling group showed Merkley with a 50 to 32 percent advantage over Monica Wehby. Begich led each of the three major GOP candidates in last month's PPP survey: 42 to 37 percent over Daniel Sullivan, 41 to 33 percent over Mead Treadwell, and 43 to 27 percent over Joe Miller.


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