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U.S. Senate


Which State's US Senators are Drawn from the House at the Highest Rate?

Hawaii, Virginia, Massachusetts, Maryland, and Connecticut dip into the US House the most frequently; Alaska, Oregon, Wyoming, Florida, and Nebraska the least.

Leaders of the PAC: Which 2012 US Senate Incumbents are Most Reliant on PAC Donations?

Tom Carper, Ben Nelson, and Joe Manchin have received the largest percentage of funds from political committees this cycle.

Will the GOP Give Linda McMahon a Second Chance in 2012?

Four losing major party U.S. Senate nominees in Connecticut history have later secured a second nomination, although none in 50 years.

Head of the Class: The Most Buzzworthy House Freshmen of the 112th Congress

Allen West, Joe Walsh, Tim Scott, and Sean Duffy are the most covered U.S. House freshmen of 2011.

Tammy Baldwin Seeks First Female Democratic U.S. Senate Nomination in Wisconsin History

Baldwin vies to become the second woman to receive a major party nod in a Badger State U.S. Senate contest joining Republican Susan Engeleiter.

When Will Wyoming Elect a Democrat to D.C.?

The Equality State has not been represented by a Democrat on Capitol Hill for 11,925 days and counting (32+ years).

Shays to Seek Connecticut US Senate Seat Despite Narrow Historical Pathway

Only two former U.S. Representatives have been popularly elected to the U.S. Senate in Connecticut; neither won their first Senate race.

GOP Aims to Hold All North Dakota Seats on Capitol Hill for 1st Time in Over 50 Years

Republicans last held all of North Dakota's U.S. Senate and House seats in January 1959.

Pawlenty Defeats Klobuchar? Don't Hold Your Breath

Sitting or former Minnesota governors have lost 11 of 12 U.S. Senate campaigns since popular vote elections were introduced 100 years ago.

Could Amy Klobuchar Win 60 percent of the Vote in 2012?

Only two Democratic Senate candidates in Minnesota have ever reached the 60 percent mark in state history.

'The Hill' Finds Republicans Beautiful

GOPers dominate Democrats 27 to 16 on the annual '50 Most Beautiful' list after Democrats held a 111-70 advantage over the four previous years.

Old Guard 2012 US Senate Incumbent Fundraising Down Millions from 2006

Contributions have dropped more than $6 million in real dollars among the nine 2+ term Senators on the ballot in 2012; almost all among Democrats.

Minnesota 2012 US Senate Race Fundraising Down 65 Percent from 2008

Nearly $7 million more dollars had been raised at this stage of the 2008 campaign.

Hoekstra Challenge in Michigan U.S. Senate Race Faces Long Historical Odds

It has been over 150 years since an ex-U.S. Representative won a Senate seat in Michigan.

Tim Kaine's Ball and Chain: His DNC Past

Only one party chair has successfully entered or reentered political office by winning a U.S. Senate seat in the last 100 years.

Will Any Century-Long Streaks End in 2012 U.S. Senate Races?

More than a dozen states have never popularly elected a GOP Senator while voting for a Democratic presidential nominee in the same cycle; will any break with tradition in 2012?

U.S. Senate Eyes First Session During 4th of July Holiday Since Watergate

The last time Congress did not take a July 4th recess was in 1974 in the midst of President Richard Nixon's last days in office at the climax of the Watergate scandal.

Gillibrand Scores Biggest Fundraising Surge Among 2012 U.S. Senate Incumbents

New York junior Senator jumps from #17 to #5 for cash on hand among 2012 U.S. Senate incumbents last quarter.

Could Tommy Thompson Win Wisconsin's U.S. Senate Seat?

No ex- (non-sitting) Wisconsin governor has ever been elected to a 1st term in the U.S. Senate

Joe Donnelly Tries to Pull a Quayle

Only one sitting U.S. House member has won a Senate race from Indiana since popular vote elections were introduced: Dan Quayle



Political Crumbs

No 100-Year Curse for Roberts

Defeating his Tea Party primary challenger Milton Wolf with just 48.1 percent of the vote, Pat Roberts narrowly escaped becoming the first elected U.S. Senator from Kansas to lose a renomination bid in 100 years. The last - and so far only - elected U.S. Senator to lose a Kansas primary was one-term Republican Joseph Bristow in 1914. Bristow was defeated by former U.S. Senator Charles Curtis who went on to win three terms before becoming Herbert Hoover's running mate in 1928. Only one other U.S. Senator from the Sunflower State has lost a primary since the passage of the 17th Amendment: Sheila Frahm in 1996. Frahm was appointed to fill Bob Dole's seat earlier that year and finished 13.2 points behind Sam Brownback in the three-candidate primary field. Overall, incumbent senators from Kansas have won 29 times against two defeats in the direct vote era. (Curtis also lost a primary in 1912 to Walter Stubbs, one year before the nation moved to direct elections).


The Second Time Around

Former Republican Congressman Bob Beauprez became the seventh major party or second place gubernatorial candidate in Colorado to get a second chance at the office when he narrowly won his party's nomination last month. Two of the previous six candidates were successful. Democrat Alva Adams lost his first gubernatorial bid to Benjamin Eaton in 1884, but was victorious two years later against William Meyer. Democrat Charles Johnson placed third in 1894 behind Republican Albert McIntyre and Populist incumbent Governor David Waite but returned as the Fusion (Democrat/Populist) nominee in 1898 and defeated GOPer Henry Wolcott. Gubernatorial candidates who received a second chance but lost both general elections include Democrat Thomas Patterson (1888, 1914), Progressive Edward Costigan (1912, 1914), Republican Donald Brotzman (1954, 1956), and Republican David Strickland (1978, 1986).


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