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U.S. Senate


Eric Hovde: Is Another Political Outsider Headed to the US Senate from Wisconsin?

Hovde, surging in the GOP primary polls, would be just the third political novice elected to the U.S. Senate from the Badger State.

House and Senate GOP Rooting for NL Victory in Tuesday's All-Star Game

Since 1950, gains of 5+ Republican seats in the U.S. Senate and 10+ seats in the House have always been preceded by a National League victory.

History Gives Baldwin, Neumann Long Odds in Wisconsin US Senate Bids

Only two of 15 ex- or sitting Badger State U.S. Representatives have run successful U.S. Senate campaigns; two more may go down in 2012.

McCain, Rubio, GOP Dominate Broadcast Media Coverage of US Senators in 2012

Republican senators are mentioned in more than twice as many news stories as their Democratic counterparts with John McCain and Marco Rubio leading the GOP to eight of the Top 10 slots.

Will Confidence in Supreme Court Erode or Rebound After Obamacare Decision?

The U.S. Supreme Court's net confidence rating during Barack Obama's presidency is at an all-time low since Gallup's measurement began in the early 1970s.

Climbing the Ladder

When Iowa Republican Chuck Grassley won reelection for a sixth term in November 2010 he and his fellow Iowa U.S. Senator, Democratic Tom Harkin, were 11th on the all-time list for the longest-serving delegation members serving together to the nation's upper legislative chamber. After the first 17+ months of the...

Fun Facts in Texas U.S. Senate Primary Election History

Nearly 40 percent of Lone Star State Democratic primaries for U.S. Senate have gone to a runoff since 1916 with the second place candidate winning in more than half of the runoff elections.

Look to Senate Race, Not Walker Recall for Romney vs Obama Tilt in Wisconsin

The Badger State has voted for the same party in presidential and U.S. Senate races in 14 of 16 cycles over the last century.

GOP Seeks First Grip on Both US Senate Seats in Decades in Florida, Nebraska, North Dakota, Wisconsin

The last time Florida Republicans held both Senate seats was 1875; WI (1957), ND (1960), and NE (1976) could also see an end to a decades-long Democratic presence in its state delegations.

Fischer Edges Bruning in 2nd Closest Nebraska GOP US Senate Primary in History

Only Hugh Butler's 3.3-point victory in 1940 was more narrowly decided than the Cornhusker Republican Senate contest on Tuesday out of 37 contests since 1916.

Lugar Could Become Just 2nd 6-Term Senator to Lose Renomination Bid in 100 Years

Only one six-term U.S. Senator has lost his party's nomination out of two-dozen who completed their sixth term in the direct election era.

Wisconsin's Other Big Ticket Summer Election: The Republican US Senate Primary

Republicans have won 15 of 28 general election U.S. Senate contests after holding a contested primary and just 1 of 8 when uncontested.

Angus King Embarks On Well-Trodden Pathway to Maine US Senate Seat

Nine sitting or former governors have been elected U.S. Senator in the Pine Tree State including four during the popular vote era.

Will Snowe Retirement Give Maine Democrats Rare Congressional Delegation Majority?

Democrats have held a majority of U.S. Senate and U.S. House seats from Maine for just seven out of 79 cycles since the formation of the GOP in the 1850s.

Will the Glass Ceiling Shatter in Iowa and North Dakota This November?

Five states have yet to elect a woman to Congress including two in the Upper Midwest.

Al Franken on Al Franken

"I think I've done a pretty good job, actually."

Joe Kennedy III May Reboot the Kennedy Dynasty's Congressional Franchise

Five Kennedys in Joe's ancestral line have logged more than 92 years of service in Congress - besting the Longs of Louisiana by 21 years.

Could Bob Kerrey be the Dan Coats of 2012? Interrupted US Senate Tenures Across History

Over the last 222 years, 150 U.S. Senators have had a gap in service in the nation's upper legislative chamber - lasting more than a decade for 32 of them.

Jon Kyl: The Big Gun with the Short Name

At six letters, Kyl has the shortest legal first and last name out of the 1,931 men and women to serve in the U.S. Senate; that's a far cry from Frederick Frelinghuysen.

Can Democrats Save Their North Dakota U.S. Senate Seat in 2012?

Heidi Heitkamp would be just the second current or former ND Attorney General elected to the US Senate while Rick Berg attempts to be the seventh US Representative.



Political Crumbs

Strike Three for Miller-Meeks

Iowa Republicans had a banner day on November 4th, picking up both a U.S. Senate seat and one U.S. House seat, but Mariannette Miller-Meeks' defeat in her third attempt to oust Democrat Dave Loebsack in the 2nd CD means the GOP will not have a monopoly on the state's congressional delegation in the 114th Congress. The loss by Miller-Meeks (following up her defeats in 2008 and 2010) means major party nominees who lost their first two Iowa U.S. House races are now 0 for 10 the third time around in Iowa history. Miller-Meeks joins Democrat William Leffingwell (1858, 1868, 1870), Democrat Anthony Van Wagenen (1894, 1912 (special), 1912), Democrat James Murtagh (1906, 1914, 1916), Democrat Clair Williams (1944, 1946, 1952), Democrat Steven Carter (1948, 1950, 1956), Republican Don Mahon (1966, 1968, 1970), Republican Tom Riley (1968, 1974, 1976), Democrat Eric Tabor (1986, 1988, 1990), and Democrat Bill Gluba (1982, 1988, 2004) on the Hawkeye State's Three Strikes list.


Larry Pressler Wins the Silver

Larry Pressler may have fallen short in his long-shot, underfunded, and understaffed bid to return to the nation's upper legislative chamber, but he did end up notching the best showing for a non-major party South Dakota U.S. Senate candidate in more than 90 years. Pressler won 17.1 percent of the vote which is the best showing for an independent or third party U.S. Senate candidate in the state since 1920 when non-partisan candidate Tom Ayres won 24.1 percent in a race won by Republican Peter Norbeck. Overall, Pressler's 17.1 percent is good for the second best mark for a non-major party candidate across the 35 U.S. Senate contests in South Dakota history. Independent and third party candidates have appeared on the South Dakota U.S. Senate ballot just 25 times over the last century and only three have reached double digits: Pressler in 2014 and Ayres in 1920 and 1924 (12.1 percent). Pressler's defeat means he won't become the oldest candidate elected to the chamber in South Dakota history nor notch the record for the longest gap in service in the direct election era.


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