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The Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Department of History are pleased to announce the Bernard and Fern Badzin Graduate Fellowship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies has been awarded to Paula Sofia Cuellar.

Cuellar's research project will focus on genocide of indigenous people in El Salvador and Paraguay in the twentieth century. She suggests that during the military dictatorships of General Maximiliano Hernández in El Salvador (1931 to 1944) and of General Alfredo Stroessner in Paraguay (1954 to 1989), the genocide of indigenous people characterized national security policies in both countries.

Cuellar's academic education includes a LL.B. Degree from the Central American University "José Simeón Cañas" and includes a Master´s Degree in Human Rights and Education for Peace from the University of El Salvador and a LL.M. Degree in International Human Rights Law from Notre Dame. She also has a Postgraduate Diploma on Human Rights and Democratization´s Processes from the University of Chile and several diplomas on constitutional law and transitional justice courses. She is currently working towards a minor in Human Rights and an advanced degree in History at the University of Minnesota.

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Wahutu Siguru the recipient of the Badzin Graduate Fellowship in 2013-2014 will receive a $9,000 fellowship extension for Spring semester of 2015 to continue his research. Siguru seeks to answer the questions about what frames and memories journalists (especially African journalists) rely upon when reporting about mass violence, specifically on Darfur. Siguru hopes to show how the way conflict situations are represented have consequences on how suffering and victimization are understood and what types of responses they will inspire in terms of possible interventions (humanitarian, legal or military).

One of the less known dimensions of the history of World War II was how Jews living under French colonial rule in North Africa were devastated by the fall of France and the establishment of the French collaborationist government of Vichy in 1940. The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) in Washington, DC has in recent years amassed a considerable archive related to the Jews of North Africa during the war and has encouraged scholars to research this subject.

In June 2010, Daniel Schroeter, the Amos S. Deinard Memorial Chair in Jewish History at the University of Minnesota, co-taught a research workshop at the USHMM, and began studying their voluminous collection of documents. He will be returning to Washington, DC, having been awarded the Ina Levine Invitational Scholar Fellowship at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies of the USHMM for the 2014-2015 academic year.

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During Schroeter's residency at the USHMM, he will be conducting research for a book on the subject of Vichy and the Jews in the protectorate of Morocco. Jews under French colonial rule were legally classified as indigenous Moroccan subjects of the sultan, a ruler whose power was limited and controlled by the French administration. The anti-Jewish laws, instigated by the central Vichy government in France, and promulgated in Morocco by the French protectorate authorities as royal decrees signed by the sultan Mohammed Ben Youssef, revealed the racism and discrimination inherent in the colonial system and the ambivalent position of the Moroccan monarchy and the Muslim population towards the Jews.

Research conducted at the Center will focus on the legal, social, and economic impact of the Vichy regime on the Moroccan Jewish communities, the response of the Muslim leaders and population to the anti-Jewish measures implemented in different parts of the country, and the contested politics of remembrance of World War II in Morocco.

For more information on Daniel Schroeter, please click here.

Registration for University of Minnesota's fall 2014 semester is now open with a number of courses that fall within the Center's interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Holocaust and genocide.

The following courses are designed to provide direct and comprehensive instruction on the topic of the Holocaust, as well as the social, memorial and political impact of genocides:

History 3729, Nazi Germany and Hitler's Europe
Professor Gary Cohen
Comprehensive exploration of Third Reich. Students will examine How the Nazis came to power, transformations of 1930s, imposition of racial politics against Jews/others, nature of total war. Students read historical accounts, memoirs, state documents, view films.

Global Studies 4910, "Never Again!" Memory and Politics After Genocide
Professor Alejandro Baer
This course focuses on the aftermath of large-scale political violence. How do individuals, communities and societies come to terms with these atrocities? How do successor regimes balance the demands for justice with the need for peace and reconciliation? How is public memory of the atrocities constructed?

For an extended list of multi-disciplinary courses that present contextual studies of conflicts, human rights violations, power dynamics, social memory and transformation that are mirrored in the Holocaust and other genocides, please see the Fall 2014 Courses List.pdf

To register please visit the University of Minnesota's One Stop Home.

On May 8th, the Reframing Mass Violence Collaborative hosted Associate Researcher of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Francisco Ferrándiz, to present a lecture entitled Exhumations, Memory and the Return of Civil War Ghosts in Spain.

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In his talk, Ferrándiz examined the social process of the exhumation of mass graves from the Spanish Civil War and the Post-War years, including from political and legal initiatives of great social and media impact to local actions on the ground, at times failed, ephemeral or almost imperceptible, but no less crucial.

To view the lecture please click here.

This event was co-sponsored by the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.


On April 16, 17 & 19, the Institute for Global Studies, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Human Rights Program held a series of events to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 1994 genocide that took the lives of an estimated 500,000-1,000,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus. The events included a public conference, a student conference, and a K-16 teacher workshop. The objectives of the commemorative events were: promoting public understanding of what happened in Rwanda, discussing the immediate responses of the international community to the violence, and analyzing the long-term consequences that the cataclysmic failure to prevent the genocide had on international policy and action.

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The public conference, Genocide and its Aftermath: Lessons from Rwanda, was designed to bring together research and praxis. Academics, activists and diplomats led a public exploration of what we have learned from the genocide in Rwanda and how we have been affected by, and should use, that knowledge to create more effective methods of intervention. Themes of the panels included: representations of atrocity, immediate aftermaths, transitional justice and its impacts, and preventing genocide and mass atrocity.

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Watch the conference's opening address by Taylor Krauss, founder of Voices of Rwanda, and the keynote address by Adama Dieng, United Nations Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, as well as the three panel discussions, by clicking here or visiting CHGS' youtube channel.


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Dr. Hollie Nyseth Brehm will represent the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies this summer at the International Association of Genocide Scholars (IAGS) Conference, "Time, Movement, and Space: Genocide Studies and Indigenous Peoples." Held at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada from July 16-19, 2014, this eleventh annual conference presents an opportunity for genocide scholars to engage in discussion about colonial control over, expansion into, appropriation and settlement of Indigenous territories.

At the Saturday session of the conference, Dr. Nyseth Brehm will join Christoper Uggen and Jean-Damascene Gasanabo to present a panel on "Genocide, Justice and Rwanda's Gacaca Courts" under the conference's heading of "Genocide's Spaces of Law and Justice."

On June 9, 2014 Dr. Nyseth Brehm successfully defended her dissertation, "Conditions and Courses of Genocides." Her advisors are professors Elizabeth Boyle and Joachim Savelsberg. In fall 2014, Dr. Nyseth Brehm will begin her career as an Assistant Professor of Sociology with the Department of Sociology at Ohio State University-Columbus.


Each spring, the Human Rights Program and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies celebrate the tremendous work of students in human rights with the Inna Meiman Award and the Sullivan Ballou Award. This year three University of Minnesota undergraduate students have been recognized for their accomplishments in promoting and protecting human rights. Melanie Paurus has been awarded the 4th Annual Inna Meiman Human Rights Award, while Joe Fifield and Anna Meteyer have been honored with the Sullivan Ballou Award.

The Inna Meiman Award is given in recognition of the friendship between Inna Meiman, a Soviet era Jewish refusenik who was repeatedly denied a visa to seek medical treatment, and Lisa Paul, a graduate of the University of Minnesota who fought tirelessly on her behalf, including a 25-day hunger strike that galvanized a movement for Inna's freedom. The award is intended to recognize a University of Minnesota student who embodies a commitment to human rights. As this year's recipient, Melanie Paurus will receive a $1,000 scholarship.

The Sullivan Ballou Award is supported by the Sullivan Ballou Fund and is named after Major Sullivan Ballou, an Army soldier killed at the First Battle of Bull Run in the U.S. Civil War. The award honors Major Ballou's memory by recognizing a student who devotes heartfelt energy to promote human rights. The Sullivan Ballou Fund gives $1000 awards to celebrate and affirm people acting from the heart. They provide compassion, services, or advocacy to their local communities, the poor, homeless, children, victims of violence and mistreatment or the disabled.

Melanie, Joe and Anna embody the spirit with which these awards were created - recognizing a significant personal contribution to protecting human rights and the heartfelt energy that compels an advocate to take meaningful action.

Francisco Ferrandiz, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)

Reframing Mass Violence: Human Rights and Social Memory in Latin America and Southern Europe.

Thursday, May 8
3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
1-109 Herbert M Hanson, Jr Hall

Since 2000, the exhumation of mass graves from the Spanish Civil War and the Post-War years, mostly involving the largely abandoned graves of civilians killed in the Francoist rearguard by paramilitary groups, has become a central element in contemporary social and political debates in the country about the nature of the armed conflict and the dictatorial regime following it. Although exhumations have become a crucial tool for symbolic reparation and have triggered claims for justice for the crimes committed and now unearthed, the social process unleashed by their opening is way larger, and relates to the emergence of a fragmented and heterogeneous political culture focused on the memory of the defeated in the war.

In this talk, the complexity and dynamism of this process is analyzed, including from political and legal initiatives of great social and media impact to local actions on the ground, at times failed, ephemeral or almost imperceptible, but no less crucial. Regional differences, associated to uneven public memory policies, will also be considered.

Organized by the IAS Reframing Mass Violence Research Collaborative. Cosponsored by the Human Rights Program, and the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

On November 24-26, 2014, a conference entitled, Bystanders, Rescuers or Perpetrators? The Neutrals and the Shoah - Facts, Myths and Countermyths, will be held at Centro Sefarad-Israel in Madrid, Spain.

This conference is supported by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (IHRA) and sponsored by Centro Sefarad Israel - Madrid; Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies- University of Minnesota; Mémorial de la Shoah - Paris; History Unit of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs of Switzerland - Berne; Topography of Terror Foundation - Berlin; Living History Forum - Stockholm; Memoshoá/Association for the Education and Remembrance of the Holocaust - Lisbon and Tarih Vakfı/History Foundation - Istanbul.

The conveners are calling for scholarly papers on the policies of the neutral countries during the Holocaust and the public debate on them in these countries.

The conference will thus aim at addressing the following issues:

•The neutral countries' reactions to Nazi anti-Jewish policies and their own policies on Jewish refugees;
•Their response to the German ultimatum of 1943 to either repatriate Jews with citizenship from their respective countries who lived in Nazi-occupied Europe or to allow their deportation;
•The genesis and long-lasting effects of "rescue myths", the current state of the discussion regarding the neutral countries' positions during the Holocaust;
•The dealing with the history of the Jewish persecution in state fact-finding commissions and committees of historians;
•Approaches to Holocaust education in neutral countries.
•Holocaust public memory (ceremonies, memorials, museums) and memory politics in neutral countries.

Please send your proposals (up to 350 words) and brief CVs no later than May 25, 2014 to: conference2014@sefarad-israel.es

For more information, please view Call for Papers Bystanders.doc

Marisol Soto, PhD student at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Holocaust Genocide & Mass Violence Studies Workshop (HGMV)

Thursday, May 1
Room 609 Social Sciences
3:00PM

Marisol Soto's project examines the intersection among photography, social integration beyond trauma and the action of human rights organizations, and explores the important role that photography plays in documenting and reporting human trafficking that targets indigenous populations. I contend that genocides do not only result in direct violence against their victims, but also leave vulnerable communities of survivors that are targets of further violence. In addition, this proposal examines paradoxes resulting from the use of testimonies and archives outside the human rights community, such as in the consumption of atrocity in the media, an act which leads to the re-victimization of young women and children who are victims of trafficking. Finally, I will use photography and literary and testimonial narratives in new ways that complement more traditional forms of expression and provide new insights into the trauma of the victims, with the ultimate goal of contributing to their recovery and protection, and to raise awareness in the society.

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