Category "Resources"

Category "Standards"

Category "Technology Literacy"

August 26, 2005

Advancing Excellence in Technological Literacy

The International Technology Education Association (ITEA) has produced a series of standards for technological literacy in the K-12 context. The standards were developed as a result of interviews with educators and experts in a wide range of fields (including education, technology, mathematics, and science). ITEA developed standards for K-12 content, administrators, professional development, and student assessment.

In addition to the standards, ITEA offers a number of other useful bits of information, including a definition of technological literacy, characteristics of a technologically-literate citizen, and a rationale for technological literacy.

The executive summary of this report can be downloaded here.

A copy of the content standards can be downloaded here.

Posted by chri1010 at 12:59 PM | Resources | Standards | Technology Literacy

Category "Academic publications"

Category "Technology Literacy"

August 4, 2005

Technology and Literacy in the Twenty-First Century

Cynthia Selfe (1999), a composition and communications professor at Michigan Technical University, has published a book about technology literacy. Technology and Literacy in the Twenty-First Century describes the Technology Literacy Project and, to a large degree, the implications of changing definitions of literacy for composition teachers.

A full description of this book can be found here.

Posted by chri1010 at 11:04 AM | Academic publications | Technology Literacy

Category "Definitions"

Category "Technology Literacy"

Category "University of Minnesota"

July 5, 2005

Technology Literacy--Another Definition

Here's a definition of technology literacy, written by Billie Wahlstrom:

"Technological literacy is not a 'skill' in the narrow sense, but a series of 'literacies' that are at the heart of the academic enterprise. Faculty and staff have to know what tools the University has, how to find help and resources, what best practices are, and how using technologies will improve their teaching and their work. In the academic setting technological literacy isn't about button pushing but must include education in intellectual property, academic integrity, security and risk management, copyright and fair use, privacy and piracy, accessibility, identity management, and ethical and legal considerations."

Although this definition does not explicity mention students, it certainly can apply to them.

Posted by chri1010 at 9:09 AM | Definitions | Technology Literacy | University of Minnesota

Category "Information Literacy"

Category "Resources"

Category "Technology Literacy"

Category "University of Minnesota"

June 29, 2005

Tech Talk

Tech Talk is a 30 minute television program hosted by Susan McKinnell. Produced by the University of Minnesota, the show airs Sundays at 9:00 pm on Twin Cities Public Television channel 17.

Tech Talk is designed to introduce viewers to a wide range of technologies and technology issues. Program topics covered have included using a digital camera, computer viruses, identity theft, etc. A complete listing of the program schedule can be found here.

Previous episodes are available, both as streaming video and as transcripts. Tech Talk also has a lengthy glossary of tech terms. An additional Tech Talk resource is that readers/viewers can submit questions, and the answers are then posted on the Tech Talk site. A complete listing of questions thus far is available here.

Posted by chri1010 at 2:58 PM | Information Literacy | Resources | Technology Literacy | University of Minnesota

Category "Beyond Minnesota Borders"

Category "Beyond Minnesota Borders"

Category "Information Literacy"

Category "K-12"

Category "Standards"

Category "Technology Literacy"

Wisconsin's Model Academic Standards for Information and Technology Literacy

Our neighbors to the east have developed a set of standards for K-12. Link to the PDF of the full report, including the standards, here.

Posted by chri1010 at 2:05 PM | Beyond Minnesota Borders | Beyond Minnesota Borders | Information Literacy | K-12 | Standards | Technology Literacy

Category "Information Literacy"

Category "Technology Literacy"

Category "University of Minnesota"

4-H and Technology

The 4-H youth programs sponsored by the University of Minnesota Extension Service have several initiatives related to information technology. The full description of 4-H's technology programs can be found on their website. Currently, their website has information from a few years back. When I get an update on their programs, I'll post it here.

Posted by chri1010 at 1:41 PM | Information Literacy | Technology Literacy | University of Minnesota

Category "Competencies"

Category "Technology Literacy"

Category "University of Minnesota"

June 24, 2005

University of Minnesota Extension Service Technology Competencies

As of June 2004, the University of Minnesota Extension Service has developed a set of technology competencies to be used for employee self-assessment and professional development purposes. These competencies reflect the Extension Information and Learning Technology Unit's Training Philosophy, which supports shared training responsiblity, emphasis on transferable skills, "self learning," application of technology to improve the quality of Extension programming, and training county technology contacts.

Extension competencies are divided into two areas: technology competencies for all employees and additional competencies for those who design trainings. The basic technology competencies for all staff include the following:


1. General computing knowlege (including network logon, sharing files, managing passwords, using a data projector, etc)

2. Windows operating system (install/remove software, burn a CD, create folders, etc)

3. Microsoft Word (including format text, create/format tables, insert graphics, find and replace, etc)

4. Microsoft Powerpoint (create, edit, and deliver a Powerpoint)

5. Microsoft Excel (understand the purpose of spreadsheets and be able to create and work with them)

6. E-mail (Send/receive email and manage email account)

7. Use of Internet (Use an internet browser, find Extension information and order publications, etc)

8. Graphics (Edit photos, know differences in graphic formats and use them appropriately)

9. Calendar (view calendars and schedule meetings)

10. County websites (manage content: publications, calendars, and other files)

11. Workshops database (add/manage workshop registrations, edit information, run reports)

12. Accomplishments and results (create and run reports)

13. 4-H Plus! and Fair Plus! Software

14. Media for Educational Programming--Extension Educators, Directors, Area Program Leaders, Capacity Area Leaders, and Campus Faculty (understand one's own role as a subject expert and also the role of the technology/media expert; know how to select appropriate media; understand the cost/benefit of educational technology; evaluation educational products)

Posted by chri1010 at 11:26 AM | Competencies | Technology Literacy | University of Minnesota

Category "Technology Literacy"

Category "University of Minnesota"

My AHC Portal

Similar to the My U Portal, the Academic Health Center offers a My AHC Portal. The My AHC Portal is similar to My U; the significant difference is that the front page news on My AHC is more oriented toward health care.

My AHC Portal is only available to students, faculty, and staff affiliated with the Academic Health Center; however, the link to the Portal can be found on the Academic Health Center's main page.

Posted by chri1010 at 10:42 AM | Technology Literacy | University of Minnesota

Category "Information Literacy"

Category "Resources"

Category "Technology Literacy"

Pew report on the Internet and American Life

This report on internet usage by US Americans suggests that while, "for the most part, the online world mirrors the offline world (p. 58), the internet has also created a space for people to do things previously unimagined: sharing information via blogs; music sharing; rating people, services and products (p. 58). In addition to documenting current usage levels, the Pew report also considers the future, with implications for technology and information literacy:

"In the future, wireless connectivity will increase through laptops, cell phones, and personal digital devices such as Palm Pilots and Blackberries. Phones themselves will increasingly become powerful computing and gaming devices. More things will become connected to the itnernet, from cars to home appliances to jewelry. And more meaning will be extracted from the information online as search engines get better and as connections between related bits of data grow" (p. 69).

The full report from Pew is available as a PDF here.

Posted by chri1010 at 10:23 AM | Information Literacy | Resources | Technology Literacy

Category "Competencies"

Category "Resources"

Category "Standards"

Category "Technology Literacy"

Category "University of Minnesota"

School Technology Leadership Initiative

The School Technology Leadership Initiative is true to its name--this program is designed to build technology leadership capacity for educational professionals, both K-12 and in higher education.

Co-directed by Dr. Scott McLeod and Dr. Joan Hughes, the STLI offers a certificate program based on the National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators.

STLI also supports a blog that serves as a technology resource for K-12 educators. The blog is an excellent source of current technology issues of relevance to the K-12 setting, although much of this information is applicable to other educational contexts.

Posted by chri1010 at 9:37 AM | Competencies | Resources | Standards | Technology Literacy | University of Minnesota

Category "Competencies"

Category "Teaching Resources"

Category "Technology Literacy"

June 23, 2005

20 Technology Skills Every Educator Should Have

T.H.E. Journal has recently published a list of the 20 Technology Skills Every Educator Should Have. With each technology skill, Laura Turner offers links to online tutorials. Turner points out that technology is always changing, and that part of an educator's strive for excellence should include time to develop and maintain one's technological competency.

Posted by chri1010 at 8:51 AM | Competencies | Teaching Resources | Technology Literacy

Category "Competencies"

Category "Teaching Resources"

Category "Technology Literacy"

Category "University of Minnesota"

June 22, 2005

Next Generation of the Professorate Program

This technology literacy initiative is designed for new faculty to develop their technology literacy in order to develop TEL competencies. The key feature of this program is that new faculty are paired with more experienced faculty, who serve as mentors. More information on this program is available here.

Posted by chri1010 at 12:19 PM | Competencies | Teaching Resources | Technology Literacy | University of Minnesota

Category "Academic publications"

Category "Definitions"

Category "Technology Literacy"

June 17, 2005

Technology Literacy for the Nation and for its Citizens

This white paper from 1995 by Thomas and Knezek articulates a strong concern about the gap between the number of citizens who are technologically competent and the growing need for technological competency in the global economy.

This white paper defines technology literacy as involving the following:

*demystifying technology through conceptual understandings of the underlying science and mathematics principles,

*operational competence with modern technology systems,

*the ability to evaluate and use a variety of common technology applications,

*the ability to innovate and invent ways of applying technology in challenging new situations,

*an awareness of technology-related careers and of factors critical to
success in those careers, and

*understanding of and sensitivity to societal issues related to technology.

Thomas and Knezek observe that in order to have a technologically literate citizenry, there must be an infrastructure to support the development of technological competency. They conclude with the following action items:

Action #1: Revise school curricula and develop standards to address the science and mathematics of technology.

Action #2: Establish technology literacy as a priority for adult education and worker retraining.

Action #3: Formulate policies that place technology literacy for all Americans on the national agenda

Finally, Thomas and Knezek assert that developing technological literacy requires effort on multiple levels:

"The task of achieving a technology-literate nation will depend on the combined efforts of the education, business, and policy-making communities."

Posted by chri1010 at 9:49 AM | Academic publications | Definitions | Technology Literacy