Schizophrenia

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Today, over 2 million people are suffering from Schizophrenia. The symptoms of Schizophrenia fall into three categories: positive symptoms, negative symptoms, and cognitive symptoms. Little is known about the neurobiology of this disease, particularly concerning circuits and molecules. Impairments within the various circuits and molecules affects cognition in the disease. A recent study published in the Journal of Neuroscience provided evidence that deficits in a brain chemical may be responsible for some of the debilitating cognitive effects such as poor attention, memory, and problem-solving skills. This is one of the first studies to explore the strong correlation between cognitive deficits and and a decrease in a particular neurotransmitter. Schizophrenia sufferers are subject to visual and auditory hallucinations as well as cognitive difficulties that interfere with everyday activities.

This study looked at the neurotransmitter, GABA, which has played a role in cognitive difficulties for people who have schizophrenia. Researchers GABA levels in the visual cortexes of 13 patients with the disorder and 13 patients without the disorder. Measurements were conducted with high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Schizophrenic patients were found to have a deficit in GABA of about 10% to those without the disease. The second part of the study looked at the neurochemical deficit on cognitive behavior. GABA levels were assessed by showing patients a well-known illusion in which a presence of a high contrast surrounding region inhibits the ability to perceive information in the center of the visual field. Research showed that the surround-suppression illusion had a less effect on schizophrenia patients which was an unusual situation because they out performed healthy subjects. The researchers found that the lower levels of GABA in patients were responsible for the abnormal behavior.
This research provided support for targeting the GABA system for treatment of cognitive decline in schizophrenia.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100310175130.htm

2 Comments

I'll be reading your blog with interest! My current masters project involves looking at GABA as it relates to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia! Good stuff.

So this was the first blog from PZ's site that I went to, as it sounds interesting. I mean..."what's GABA," I think, "Swedish pop songs in the head?" I don't know, so let's go check it out.

All's well and good, until I get to the second paragraph where you, Chunk002, write, "GABA levels were assessed by showing patients a well-known illusion in which a presence of a high contrast surrounding region inhibits the ability to perceive information in the center of the visual field." And I think..."oooh, what's the illusion?" So I start to think about writing a comment and then see the link to the original article at the bottom and think, "ah, original article, I bet they might have the name of the illusion." So off I go.

In reading the Sciencedaily.com article...well, my first conclusion is that technically, your second paragraph is plagiarized from the Science Daily article. On closer examination, there have been a few word changes to make it 'technically' different but still plagiarizing. It would have been better to just copy word for word and throw some quote marks around it with the link added, than pretend to make it your own.

For example;

The quote that made me look;
Chunk002: "GABA levels were assessed by showing patients a well-known illusion in which a presence of a high contrast surrounding region inhibits the ability to perceive information in the center of the visual field."

Science Daily: "GABA levels were assessed by showing them a well-known illusion in which the presence of a high-contrast surrounding region inhibits the ability to perceive information in the center of the visual field."

Another;
Chunk002: "Research showed that the surround-suppression illusion had a less effect on schizophrenia patients which was an unusual situation because they out performed healthy subjects."

Science Daily: "The researchers showed that this surround-suppression illusion had less of an effect on patients with schizophrenia, resulting in a highly unusual situation in which they outperformed healthy subjects"

On more for good measure;
Chunk002: "Measurements were conducted with high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Schizophrenic patients were found to have a deficit in GABA of about 10% to those without the disease."

Science Daily: "The measurements were conducted with high-field magnetic resonance spectroscopy...The schizophrenic patients were found to have a deficit in GABA of about 10 percent when compared with their non-schizophrenic counterparts."

Again, without quotes you are by default making the claim that these are your own words and thoughts. But by simply changing "percent" to "%" or "that this" to "that the" you only make it look like you're trying to hide the fact that you took the words from the original article.

Though I could be wrong and would love to hear why.

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This page contains a single entry by chunk002 published on September 3, 2011 6:24 PM.

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