New Graduate Focus in Evolutionary Anthropology

The Department of Anthropology is offering a new graduate focus with training and research opportunities
in the integrated areas of paleoanthropology and behavioral biology.

The paleoanthropology focus combines biological anthropologists and Paleolithic archaeologists in the
reconstruction of hominin evolution and behavior through the application of evolutionary theory and behavioral biology to the analysis of skeletal morphology, faunal remains, site taphonomy, and lithic technology. The behavioral biology focus combines the department’s biological anthropologists as well as primatologists in the Jane Goodall Institute’s Center for Primate Studies in the study of non-human primates, human foragers, evolutionary ecology, and evolutionary theory. Regional specializations include Africa, Southwest Asia, Central Asia, and Europe. The Evolutionary Anthropology Laboratory
offers facilities in three-dimensional digital imaging and analysis, comparative primate and vertebrate skeletal anatomy, taphonomy, stone tool analysis, experimental flintknapping, and an Old World archaeology collection.

Faculty are currently conducting fieldwork at important sites such as the chimpanzee field site of Gombe in Tanzania, the Miocene fossil site of Rusinga in Kenya, the Homo erectus site of Dmanisi in Georgia, and the Early Upper Paleolithic type-site of Tvarožná in the Czech Republic. Faculty research focuses on current issues related to the origins of modern humans in Europe, analysis of stone tools, Out of Africa 1, the evolution of Miocene apes, chimpanzee behavior and aggression, as well as archaeological method and theory.

Faculty
WILLIAM BEEMAN: the evolution of language

KIERAN MCNULTY: human and primate fossil record, geometric morphometrics

GILLIANE MONNIER: lithic technology, the Lower & Middle Paleolithic, archaeological method and theory

JOHN SODERBERG: zooarchaeology, 3D digital imaging, (Acting Director of the Evolutionary Anthropology Laboratory)

MARTHA TAPPEN: zooarchaeology, taphonomy, human evolution, Out of Africa 1

GILBERT TOSTEVIN: lithic technology, Middle & Upper Paleolithic, origins of modern humans

MICHAEL WILSON: primate behavioral biology

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This page contains a single entry by cla published on November 21, 2008 2:58 PM.

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