My Experience with the Mozart Effect

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While reading chapter 10, the section that particularly interested me was the section on infant development and the Mozart effect. While the book focuses on musical stimulation after birth, my experience comes from "Prenatal Learning with Music." While my parents were pregnant with my older brother, they occasionally attempted to stimulate him with Mozart and other classical works. Remember, this is all before birth. Three years later, when they were pregnant with me, they were already parents dealing with another child and had much busier lives. They did not find time to make me subject to forced stimulation while I was in the womb. Now advance 18 years and compare my brother and I. We are almost exactly the same in terms of test scores, work ethic, and drive for success. There is no gaping discrepancy between my brother and I proving that stimulation while in the womb significantly affected his development. The only difference between him and I, he may be a much more creative individual than I am considering he will soon be an architect and I will be an accountant.
Admittedly, I cannot completely disprove that music while in the womb is a pointless practice because of this tiny sample size with no control and hardly a well set up research study, but from my personal experience, I do not see much of an effect.

While researching more background on the Idea of prenatal music development I came across babyzone.com, a typical website for excited parents. The page they have dedicated to Prenatal learning with music is pretty wimpy when it comes to psychological evidence which makes me question the validity of this phenomenon.

http://www.babyzone.com/pregnancy/article/prenatal-learning-with-music

This website doesn't really directly quote research studies or provide concrete evidence for this phenomenon. They even mention that findings vary in their results which prove issues with replicability. The only thing that has consistently been proved is that babies react to auditory stimuli while in the womb, but this has no proven effect on the cognitive and psychological development of a child.

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Thank you, it very useful for me

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This page contains a single entry by burke510 published on November 6, 2011 1:47 PM.

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